Elks’ statistical leaders

Through Monday’s game

BATTING (top 10)

Player P AVG G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB HBP SO SF SH SB CS DP E

Brennan Patterson P .333 1 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

John Arndorfer OF .333 11 36 3 12 4 0 0 3 3 0 7 0 0 1 1 1 0

Tristen Alvarez IF .288 16 66 14 19 4 1 3 10 5 1 13 0 1 1 3 2 1

Collin Runge IF .280 14 50 5 14 3 0 1 8 8 1 9 1 0 5 4 1 6

Michael Warkentin OF .275 14 40 6 11 1 0 0 1 6 0 12 0 3 2 1 0 0

Ty Holmstrom IF .259 16 58 5 15 1 0 1 9 3 1 19 0 0 4 2 1 5

Blake Mann OF .250 1 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

Jake Singer IF .243 12 37 3 9 1 0 0 3 4 0 13 1 0 2 0 1 0

Brett Auerbach C .222 6 18 1 4 1 0 0 2 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1

Tucker Rohde IF .216 13 37 2 8 1 0 0 3 2 0 11 1 0 0 0 2 2

Team totals .226 16 532 59 120 22 1 6 48 57 10 148 3 5 21 12 16 24

PITCHING (Top 10)

Player G GS CG IP H R ER BB SO W L SV 2B 3B ERA

Jake Holton 2 0 0 2.1 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0.00

Bradley Gonzales 3 0 0 4.0 2 0 0 3 4 0 0 0 0 0 0.00

Gage Gloster 3 0 0 4.1 1 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0.00

Ace Embree 5 0 0 4.2 1 3 1 2 4 1 1 0 0 0 1.92

Coen Wynne 5 0 0 7.0 3 4 2 5 7 1 0 0 0 0 2.57

Brennan Patterson 5 1 0 12.2 10 4 4 7 6 0 0 0 3 1 2.84

Luke Sleeper 1 1 0 3.0 1 3 1 3 3 0 1 0 1 0 3.00

Ethan Jones 6 0 0 7.1 9 3 3 11 4 0 0 0 0 1 3.68

Mikey Hooper 2 0 0 4.1 6 3 2 2 2 0 0 0 2 0 4.15

Sam Boone 6 0 0 8.0 3 4 4 4 7 0 0 1 1 0 4.50

Team totals 70 16 0 142 143 125 100 98 106 3 13 1 22 3 6.34

Jose Altuve is one of ­Tristen Alvarez’s favorite baseball players, and even at first glance it is easy to see why.

Altuve, the 2017 American League MVP and World Series champion as the star second baseman for the Houston Astros, is the shortest player in the big leagues at 5 feet 6 inches.

Alvarez, the starting second baseman for the Bend Elks who has been on an offensive tear in his first college wood-bat season, is quick to mention that he is 2 inches taller than Altuve.

“He’s smaller than me!” Alvarez says. “He’s doing it … he’s one of the best hitters in (Major League Baseball) for the last five years. Seeing guys like that makes me want to push myself even more. Knowing that I can do that too, that there’s a chance, that just makes me want to be like him every day.

“I try to model myself after him, just try to … even though I’m a smaller person I want people to respect me.”

Alvarez has had no problem garnering respect thus far this season in the West Coast League. The senior-to-be at Fresno Pacific University in California has three home runs and 10 RBIs, and he is batting .288 as the leadoff hitter for the Elks.

Elks head coach Alan Embree compares Alvarez to Altuve and to Boston Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia, both smallish by pro ballplayer standards and exceptional hitters who have a little more power at a position more typically noted for the slick-fielding, light-hitting types.

“For a little guy, he’s got big pop,” Embree says of Alvarez. “You’re starting to see this insurgence of the Altuves of the world, the Pedroias. I’m not used to seeing that at the ­college level, so it’s been really, really fun to watch.

“We couldn’t ask for anything more out of the kid. We’ve put him in the leadoff spot and he’s responded well. Defensively, he’s as solid as they come.”

Embree goes on to describe Alvarez as a quiet but high-energy player with a positive attitude who easily fires up his teammates.

With Collin Runge at shortstop, Embree calls his middle infield a “phenomenal duo.”

For Embree, the comparison of Alvarez to Altuve is not just as a small-but-power-hitting second baseman, but as a smart, clutch hitter.

“He goes up swinging and doesn’t get cheated,” Embree says of Alvarez. “He’s not a strikeout guy. And he’s had some really big hits for us in situations where we’ve needed it.”

Alvarez grew up in Madera, California, 23 miles from Fresno, the oldest child of four in a Mexican-American family. He is clearly grateful for his parents, who he says worked hard to help him attend Fresno Pacific, a private Christian school with an enrollment of about 3,600.

“My mom’s the best. She does everything for me,” Alvarez says. “And my dad, I respect him so much. He’s been working his whole life because they had me pretty young. He’s an electrician. But he had a lot of jobs before. He just does anything he can do to make us happy.”

Alvarez says that before he arrived in Bend in time for the Elks’ June 1 opener, the longest he had ever been away from his family was one week, and he has been with the Elks now for nearly three weeks. He claims he is not homesick, but he admits he misses his family, which includes younger brothers ages 12 and 8, and a 15-year-old sister. But he knows playing in the West Coast League is an important step toward getting drafted, which he says is his main goal.

In past summers, Alvarez says, he has played in local summer baseball leagues in Fresno or just worked out on his own.

“I’m just thankful I’m able to play here and get this opportunity,” he says of playing for the Elks. “This is way better than doing stuff on your own, because you get to meet new guys and make new friendships. You get competitive at-bats.”

Each summer, the Elks arrange host families for players from out of the area. Alvarez says his host family in Redmond has helped to ease the transition.

“I can’t ask for anybody better,” he says. “They’re always wanting to feed us. They get mad at me for not eating. Everybody’s great.”

Meanwhile, Alvarez hopes to continue this season as a power-hitting second baseman who might be shorter than most players but who can no doubt produce for his team.

“Hitting home runs … is obviously like the best feeling in the world,” Alvarez says. “Seeing guys like Altuve and how he hits, and watching his videos and stuff, it just helps me out a lot and makes me want to be like that, for sure.”

— Reporter: 541-383-0318,

mmorical@bendbulletin.com

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