Elks’ season statistics

Through Sunday’s game

BATTING

Player P AVG G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB HBP SO SF SH SB CS DP E

Collin Runge IF .400 8 30 4 12 2 0 1 7 5 0 2 0 0 4 2 0 3

Brennan Patterson P .333 1 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

John Arndorfer OF .313 6 16 1 5 2 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0

Tristen Alvarez IF .282 9 39 8 11 3 1 1 6 1 0 5 0 1 0 3 1 1

Jake Singer IF .263 6 19 1 5 1 0 0 2 0 0 6 1 0 1 0 0 0

Tucker Rohde IF .261 8 23 1 6 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 1 0 0 0 2 2

Michael Warkentin OF .250 9 28 3 7 0 0 0 1 5 0 8 0 1 0 1 0 0

Ty Holmstrom IF .226 9 31 1 7 0 0 0 3 3 1 10 0 0 2 1 0 2

Cole Frey C .200 5 15 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 0

Alex Pallios OF .188 9 32 2 6 1 0 1 2 4 2 9 0 0 1 1 1 0

Heath Pickhardt C .167 2 6 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

Khalid Johnson OF .143 3 7 3 1 1 0 0 0 3 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 0

Jerred Seamons IF .107 9 28 3 3 1 0 0 0 4 2 5 0 1 1 0 1 2

Morgan Dugi C .000 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

Chris Diehl C .000 2 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0

Jordan Sunitsch IF .000 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1

Alec Gannon IF .000 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Gabe Togia C .000 3 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0

Totals .224 9 304 30 68 12 1 3 24 27 5 73 2 3 11 9 9 11

PITCHING

Player G GS CG IP H R ER BB SO W L SV 2B 3B ERA

Gage Gloster 3 0 0 4.1 1 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0.00

Cole Frey 1 0 0 1.0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00

Sam Muskat 3 1 0 13.1 12 5 2 5 10 0 1 0 1 1 1.35

Brennan Patterson 2 1 0 4.2 5 1 1 3 3 0 0 0 2 0 1.92

Coen Wynne 1 0 0 3.2 2 3 1 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 2.45

Ace Embree 3 0 0 2.2 0 2 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 3.37

R.J. Robles 2 2 0 12.2 13 5 5 5 5 0 1 0 2 0 3.55

Ryan Mets 3 0 0 7.1 6 4 3 4 8 1 0 0 0 0 3.68

Ethan Jones 3 0 0 5.1 6 3 3 5 3 0 0 0 0 1 5.06

Jake Farnsworth 1 1 0 4.0 9 7 4 1 4 0 1 0 2 0 9.00

Same Boone 4 0 0 4.0 2 4 4 4 4 0 0 1 1 0 9.00

Khalil Rivera 2 2 0 8.1 8 10 10 11 8 0 2 0 1 0 10.80

Grant Larson 1 1 0 2.2 7 8 5 0 4 0 1 0 1 0 16.87

Daniel Naughton 1 0 0 1.0 3 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 18.00

Grant Crosby 2 0 0 1.2 3 5 5 2 2 0 0 0 2 0 27.00

Austin Crowson 1 1 0 1.2 3 5 5 2 2 0 1 0 1 0 27.00

Brett Swartz 3 0 0 2.2 2 9 9 4 3 0 0 0 0 0 30.37

Total 36 9 0 81 82 73 60 56 66 2 7 1 13 2 6.67

Sitting in the dugout while the Port Angeles Lefties took batting practice, Elks pitcher Coen Wynne gestured around Vince Genna Stadium and described the entire scene as a “luxury.”

Back home in Australia, where the 19-year-old Sydney native has played in the nation’s second highest league, facilities on par with the Elks’ are still rare.

“There wouldn’t be a grandstand. There wouldn’t be a clubhouse,” Wynne said last week. “You’d have to show up in your baseball gear or get changed in your car. It’s a luxury these guys have, with the equipment, the stadium, the fans. That’s probably the biggest difference.”

Wynne said Australian baseball still takes a back seat to rugby, cricket and soccer, but his childhood best friend’s father was raised in Texas and introduced the boys to baseball at 4 or 5.

“I definitely see baseball growing,” Wynne said. “The Australian Baseball League, the semiprofessional league down there, is growing. We’re getting two more teams in the league next year. And since Australia has gotten automatic qualification into the Little League World Series, since we moved out of the Asia-Pacific Region, baseball in Australia is getting bigger and better. We don’t have to play Chinese Taipei or Korea anymore, which is a real worry off our shoulders.”

Wynne said his favorite player growing up was closer Grant Balfour, a fellow Sydney native who debuted in ­Major League Baseball with the Minnesota Twins in 2001 and made a name for himself with the Tampa Bay Rays and Oakland Athletics before retiring after the 2015 season.

“He grew up around the corner from me; we played for the same club growing up,” ­Wynne said. “I used to look up to him a lot, and I still do. That’s who I try and emulate. He had a strong fastball, a good curve.”

Wynne just completed his freshman season at Grand Canyon University in Phoenix, where he pitched 28 ­innings in 21 appearances, finishing with a 6.75 ERA.

“I talked with my coaches back at Grand Canyon, and we just want to get a few more innings under my belt, get a lot of experience,” Wynne said. “I want to get bigger, stronger, work out a lot more and try to develop my change-up a little bit more, try and get a better pitch on the left-handed batter. If I get 40 to 50 innings, facing some pretty good hitting, it’s really going to help me when I go back to Grand Canyon.”

So far this summer, ­Wynne has appeared in one game for the Elks (2-7), allowing three runs, one earned, in 32⁄3 innings of relief. Wynne said he and a Grand Canyon teammate, Andrew Zmuda, came to the West Coast League at the urging of their college coaches, and Zmuda chose Bend over Corvallis because he would be closer to his home in Boise, Idaho.

“Honestly, coming from Australia and getting to America last August, I’ve never been to summer ball before,” Wynne admitted. “I don’t really know too much about summer ball, so it was all coach’s say. I know he’s not going to send me anywhere bad.”

But Wynne did have some experience with baseball in the United States before joining his college team. In addition to playing in a few youth tournaments held in the States, last summer he was one of 13 Australians named to an MLB world select team that played a select team from Puerto Rico as well as extended spring training teams from the Orioles, Phillies, Red Sox, Pirates, Yankees and Twins.

“Baseball has a way of humbling you,” Wynne said of the experience. “When you think you have things figured out, you really don’t. I pitched two innings against Baltimore, and I struck out four batters in two innings. I think I put one batter on base, it was a real good showing.

“And then I played the Twins, and I got hit around the park really badly. So it’s like one of those things, no matter where you think you are, there are always people out there who are better than you, and you have to work harder than them.”

Wynne will have plenty of time to put in that work this summer. In Australia, teams often have rosters of 15 or so players and might play twice a week. But college teams often play four games a week, and now that he is in summer league, his team will be in the ballpark nearly every day.

“I’d start in Australia, go one game a week, and then coming to college and playing four times a week, that’s a big shock right there,” Wynne said. “But it’s not bad. It’s the game that I grew up with and I love. Every day you get to come to the ballpark is a good day, so you’ve really got to cherish it while it’s here.”

— Reporter: 541-383-0305, vjacobsen@bendbulletin.com

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