First intended to represent a hatching caddis, the Carey Special was originally called the Monkey-faced Louise by its originators: Dr. Lloyd A. Day and Col. Carey. The current name recalls many days of honest fishing while its original name probably evoked other memories.

It’s a simple stillwater nymph, a good representative of a dragonfly nymph or a leech. Fish it at Diamond Lake, Crane Prairie, Lava Lake and other waters where trout feed on abundant dragonflies. Use a 1-inch retrieve with longer “kill” strips.

To tie this pattern, start with a No. 8 3XL long nymph hook, lay a base of thread then tie in a tail (half the shank length) of guinea feathers. The body can be built with dubbing, floss or chenille. To match the fly pictured, use peacock herl or a substitute. Keep the fly skinny, but scruffy and suggestive. Use a fine brass wire rib. Finish with a sparse guinea or pheasant soft hackle.

— Gary Lewis, For The Bulletin

First intended to represent a hatching caddis, the Carey Special was originally called the Monkey-faced Louise by its originators: Dr. Lloyd A. Day and Col. Carey. The current name recalls many days of honest fishing while its original name probably evoked other memories.

It’s a simple stillwater nymph; a good representative of a dragonfly nymph or a leech. Fish it at Diamond Lake, Crane Prairie, Lava Lake and other waters where trout feed on abundant dragonflies. Use a 1-inch retrieve with longer “kill” strips.

To tie this pattern, start with a No. 8 3XL long nymph hook, lay a base of thread then tie in a tail (half the shank length) of guinea feathers. The body can be built with dubbing, floss or chenille. To match the fly pictured, use peacock herl or a substitute. Keep the fly skinny, but scruffy and suggestive. Use a fine brass wire rib. Finish with a sparse guinea or pheasant soft hackle.

— Gary Lewis, For The Bulletin

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