Letters to the editor

(Joe Kline/Bulletin photo)

Achievement without aggression

In the Nov. 24 edition, Jackson Hogan, the Bulletin education reporter, suggests the “Fighting Rock Chucks” as the mascot for Bend’s new high school. He argues that the “proud,” “majestic,” “adorable” and “cuddly” animal would be a unique choice. I like the idea of the rock chuck but find the “fighting” adjective a curious one as he forwards no evidence in support of species’ belligerence. Based on typical mascot names and personae, I can understand why he didn’t choose the “Cuddly Rock Chucks” as a mascot. But maybe he’d welcome just “Rock Chucks,” a name that makes no claims about the animal’s temperament and, maybe more importantly, avoids the implication that achievement only comes via aggression.

— Dean Harris

Bend

Charge by road damage caused

When designing the most equitable system to cover the costs of road construction and maintenance, the obvious question is, “What causes the most road damage?” As we drive across the crisscross pattern in most intersections or hydroplane down the highway on parallel rivers of tire ruts filled with rain water, the obvious answer is studded tires.

An equitable system would take aim at the very cause of the damage. Studded tires are optional and seasonal choices made superfluous by advances in winter tire technology in other countries that recognized the damage and expense caused by metal studs.

It should be equally obvious that road wear and tear is proportional to the mass of a vehicle. High fuel mileage vehicles tend to be on the lighter side of the spectrum. The taxes collected for fuel would seem appropriate in this case as low fuel mileage vehicle use would contribute a fair share.

Fee changes aimed at high fuel mileage vehicles ignore these common sense factors. An equitable fee system for road maintenance costs should be aimed at vehicles with characteristics and equipment that cause the most damage. Your arguments as well as the vehicle registration fee changes miss the mark.

— Michael Merrifield

Bend

More impeachment on front page

Hey Bend Bulletin when are you going to start really covering the generational story of these times!? According to the front page of the Bulletin the impeachment inquiry of Donald Trump does not exist. Over the last two weeks of riveting testimony before the House.

— Michael Chiavetta

Bend

Trump’s defense has collapsed

The impeachment hearings have revealed a gang of cowardly craven apologists for Trump who no longer care about the U.S. Constitution, or the criminal conspiracy that is manifest in Trump’s behavior, his crime family and his syndicate of cultist followers.

We know Trump solicited help from a foreign government to help his 2020 reelection; we know he attempted to bribe and extort Ukraine to investigate political opponents and promote cockamamie conspiracy hoaxes; we know he attempted to obstruct the congressional committee in the legitimate performance of its duties by blocking testimony from cronies. If Trump were innocent, he would be encouraging his followers to testify.

Throughout the hearings, Trumpers moved the goalposts: first there was no quid pro quo; then it was a legitimate pursuit of corruption, then it was all hearsay and speculation. The Trump defense by his cult has collapsed like a house of cards as first one then another witness shreds the arguments.

The once proud Republican Party is left cowering amid Trump’s tatters.

— Trisha Vigil

Medford

Look at bipartisan climate solution

Thanks so much for printing the great guest column piece by the Citizens Climate Lobby co-leader, Helen Seidler.

We can all thank this amazing organization for the work they’re doing to bring about a bipartisan solution to the climate crisis. In fact there is a Bill in Congress right now that would go a long way towards addressing the crisis — at the very least it’s a bipartisan first step. I urge you to check out Citizens Climate Lobby and this bill, HR 763, on their website citizensclimatelobby.org

— Joyce C. Waterhouse

Pasadena, California

“It should be equally obvious that road wear and tear is proportional to the mass of a vehicle. … Fee changes aimed at high fuel mileage vehicles ignore these common sense factors. An equitable fee system for road maintenance costs should be aimed at vehicles with characteristics and equipment that cause the most damage. …” — Michael Merrifield, Bend

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