Nurse giving an injection

Next time you are driving along Third Street in Bend, take a look at the new billboard put up near the Bend River Promenade. It’s not clear who put it up but it reads:

“Childhood Vaccine Doses

24 in 1988

72 in 2019

Chronic illness (with an arrow pointed up) 42%

Educate before you vaccinate”

What is a person to do when confronted with information like this?

The most important thing we’d suggest: Don’t get your medical information from a billboard. Talk to your doctor.

We know people have questions about vaccines. We know some people have heard there are dark secrets about vaccines that doctors, pharmaceutical companies and others are trying to hide from the public.

But when you want to learn about something, do you trust what viral Facebook posts say? Or a billboard? They are reasons to ask questions. They aren’t reason to dismiss established science.

Let’s talk about the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, commonly called MMR. The Annals of Internal Medicine published a study earlier this year that examined what happened to 650,000 Danish children. “The risk for autism was no different in children who got the MMR vaccine than in children who did not,” the study read. “This remained true even among children who had risk factors for autism, such as a sibling with autism or an older father.”

Does that answer everybody’s questions about vaccines, safety and effectiveness? No, it does not. It’s one study. But there’s plenty more like it. St. Charles Medical Center working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also has information available at vaxforthat.org

And remember, although things like polio, diphtheria, and measles aren’t something many of us experience any more, they are nasty. The reason we don’t experience them so much any more is because of vaccines.

Talk to your doctor about vaccines.

(1) comment

Bob S

I am one of the Oregonians who helped pay for that billboard. The recommendation is to listen to your doctor on vaccines. But should you? Look, people. It is not hard. You ask your doctor what is in the shot. If the doctor doesn't know, then what are they? A highly trained, skilled, experienced professional, or a sales person?

If they do know, then ask them to go through the list explaining how each ingredient makes your baby healthy.

If they can't do that, again, what are they doing? They certainly are not knowing what they are doing to your child.

Ask your doctor if he has read any studies on any vaccine that were done using an inert, safe placebo, and not just another vaccine for the control group?

Another good question to ask your doctor is how much training they received in medical school, if any, on identifying the potential adverse reactions that can be caused by a vaccine? Are they familiar with and have they read the vaccine package insert? Will they give you a copy of the insert in addition to the one page Vaccine Information Sheet VIS) that was condensed by the CDC?

If you are pregnant and want to give you a flu shot or a DTaP vaccine, ask your doctor if they know that the vaccine package inserts states that those vaccines have never been tested for safety on pregnant women?

One last question to ask your doctor is if they know that section 13.1 of every vaccine package insert states: "this vaccine has not been evaluated for the potential to cause carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, or impairment of fertility?"

Last but not least remember, if you don't like any of the answers your doctor gives you, don't be ashamed, bullied, or coerced into saying "yes" if you want to say "no." You are the consumer and (still) have the right to decide what medical procedures you want to accept. That's what informed consent is all about. It means getting fully informed and having the right to say "no."

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