Do you have a point you’d like to make or an issue you feel strongly about? Submit a letter to the editor.

Scooter troubles not needed in Bend

I am commenting on this article originally published in the The Bulletin: “Bend won’t test shared electric scooters until 2020.”

The headline for a recent New York Times article reads “Welcome to San Diego. Don’t mind the scooters. A year ago, electric rental scooters were hailed as the next big thing in transportation. But their troubles in San Diego show how the services have now hit growing pains.”

“Hundreds are scattered around the sidewalks.” “The vehicles have led to injuries, deaths, lawsuits and vandals.”

A San Diego City Council member states, “my constituents hate them pretty universally“.

San Francisco, Paris, Atlanta and Portland have imposed stricter regulations on scooters. Columbia South Carolina, has temporarily banned them. Safety has become a big issue.

A study in Austin, Texas, found that for every 100,000 scooter rides, 20 people were injured. Nearly half of those injuries were to the head. Fifteen percent of those showed evidence of traumatic brain injury.

A man in a San Diego suburb died after he was hit by a car while riding a scooter. A tourist died a few months after crashing his rental scooter into a tree. When two scooters collided, one visitor died of “blunt force torso trauma.” There were 15 “serious injury collisions“ involving scooters in the first half of the year. Last month, there were three separate skull fractures related to scooters in one week.

This resident of Bend feels that Bend does not need scooters.

Please refer to this link for more detailed information: www.nytimes.com/2019/09/04/technology/san-diego-electric-scooters.html

Mark Greene

Bend

Need for wilderness restrictions

I recently returned from a hiking trip in the Canadian Rockies. Even in mountain areas where outhouses had been helicoptered in, there was a disgusting proliferation of human and dog waste on the ground.

There appeared to be no control over the number of hikers allowed and as a result those beautiful mountains are being polluted.

According to The Bulletin and my own observation, the same problem with human and dog waste is arising here in Central Oregon, particularly in the Broken Top/No Name Lake/Green Lakes area.

So I wholeheartedly support the current camping restrictions, as well as the planned Forest Service permit and fee requirements that will govern that area.

I don’t know of other effective, practical ways to reduce the impact of hikers and their dogs on the fragile mountain environment. Simply asking people to bury/carry out their solid waste is not working.

Christine T. Herrick

Bend

Thank caseworkers for keeping children safe

We are all in the spirit of sending kids back to school this month and have special thoughts for their safety. Keeping children safe is one of our most important endeavors — at school, in the community and in homes. Volunteers of the Citizen Review Boards (part of the judicial system) ask that you join us in offering extra special appreciation for Oregon’s Department of Human Services caseworkers during National Child Welfare Worker Appreciation Week, Sept. 9-13.

A child placed in the custody of DHS is assigned a caseworker. Caseworkers are charged with assuring the safety and well being of the child as they also work to assist parents remedy situations that resulted in the removal. Caseworkers meet with children, parents, foster parents, CASAs, medical and other service providers, school personnel, attorneys, Citizen Review Boards and judges. Their caseloads are heavy; many variables result in unpredictable situations that can lead to crisis and sometimes danger; staffing is such that the notion of “finishing my work for the day” is an impossibility; criticism frequently occurs from all directions — and often that criticism is very public.

During this appreciation week, we’d like to say to our DHS caseworkers: “Hats Off! Cheers! Thank you! You are the hands and feet of our community as you work to help children and families in Central Oregon. We sincerely appreciate all you do.”

Marcia Houston

Bend

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