World briefing

Carter

Carter hospitalized — Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter was admitted to a hospital Monday evening for a surgery to relieve pressure on his brain, caused by bleeding due to his recent falls, his spokeswoman said. The procedure was scheduled for Tuesday morning at Emory University Hospital. Carter has fallen at least three times this year, and the first incident in the spring required hip replacement surgery. Nearly four decades after he left office and despite a body that’s failing after 95 years, the nation’s oldest-ever ex-president still teaches Sunday school roughly twice a month.

Morales going to Mexico — Former Bolivian President Evo Morales said Monday he was headed for Mexico after being granted asylum there, as his supporters and foes clashed on the streets of the capital following his resignation and a tearful opposition leader laid out a possible path toward new elections. Morales stepped down Sunday following weeks of massive protests over a disputed presidential election, but the resignations of every constitutionally designated successor left unclear who will take his place and how. Morales tweeted that he was leaving Monday evening.

Another 2020 contender?
 — Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick is considering making a late run for the Democratic presidential nomination, according to two people with knowledge of his deliberations, underscoring some Democrats’ deep uncertainty about the party’s current crop of contenders. Patrick, a close friend and ally of former President Barack Obama, ruled out a presidential bid earlier this year but has since been talking with Democratic operatives and donors about launching a campaign. Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is also reconsidering a run and may make a final decision within days.

Winter already? — An arctic air mass that brought snow and ice to an area stretching from the Rocky Mountains to northern New England on Monday is poised to give way to record-breaking cold temperatures.

SpaceX satellites — SpaceX launched 60 mini satellites Monday, the second batch of an orbiting network meant to provide global internet coverage. The Falcon rocket’s flight marked the fourth one for SpaceX. The compact flat-panel satellites — just 575 pounds each — will join 60 launched in May. SpaceX founder Elon Musk plans to start service next year in the northern U.S. and Canada, with global coverage for populated areas after 24 launches.

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