— Bulletin wire reports

Japan looks for the missing after typhoon — Rescue crews dug through mudslides and searched near swollen rivers Monday after a typhoon caused serious damage in central and northern Japan, leaving dozens of people dead or missing. Typhoon Hagibis unleashed torrents of rain and strong winds Saturday that left thousands of homes on Japan’s main island flooded, damaged or without power. Authorities warned more mudslides were possible with rain forecast for the affected area during the day Monday. Kyodo News service, assembling information from a wide network, counted 35 deaths caused by the typhoon with 17 people missing. The official count from the Fire and Disaster Management Agency was 19 dead and 13 missing.

Family seeks answers after police kill woman — A white police officer who killed a black woman inside her Texas home while responding to a neighbor’s call about an open front door “didn’t have time to perceive a threat” before he opened fire, an attorney for the woman’s family said. ”You didn’t hear the officer shout, ‘Gun, gun, gun,’” attorney Lee Merritt said after viewing video taken from a Fort Worth officer’s bodycam during Saturday’s shooting of Atatiana Jefferson, 28. “He didn’t have time to perceive a threat. That’s murder.” Her family told KXAS television that Jefferson was watching her 8-year-old nephew when she was killed early Saturday.

Voters weary of more investigations — As Democrats’ impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump intensifies, Mark Stenske feels like he’s seen this movie before, and the storyline is getting old. First, there was the nearly two-year investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and Trump’s possible role in it. Then came the accusations against Trump’s pick for the Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh, and contentious hearings before a Senate committee. Now it’s questions about Trump’s dealings with Ukraine’s president and whether that should lead to Trump’s removal from office. Polling finds that support for the inquiry has grown since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announced the start of the investigation last month following a whistleblower complaint. But what those numbers don’t show is the sense of fatigue among some Americans like Stenske — a factor that could be significant as Democrats leading the inquiry debate how to proceed with an election year approaching. It’s a feeling shared by people on both sides.

Child sex abuse victims get more time to file lawsuits — California is giving childhood victims of sexual abuse more time to decide whether to file lawsuits, joining several states in expanding the statute of limitations for victims over warnings from school districts that the new rules could bankrupt them. The law signed Sunday by Gov. Gavin Newsom gives victims of childhood sexual abuse until age 40, or five years from discovery of the abuse, to file civil lawsuits. The previous limit had been 26, or within three years from discovery of the abuse. It also suspends the statute of limitations for three years, giving victims of all ages time to bring lawsuits if they wish. Earlier this year, New York and New Jersey raised their statutes of limitations to age 55. New York also suspended its statute of limitations for one year, leading to hundreds of lawsuits against hospitals, schools, the Roman Catholic Church and the late financier Jeffrey Epstein.

Killer’s portraits could help crack cold cases — Samuel Little, whom the FBI identified this month as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, produced startlingly detailed likenesses of dozens of women he says he strangled over the course of more than three decades. Now the FBI is publicizing his portraits — hoping that someone, somewhere, will recognize the face of a long-lost loved one in an image drawn by the killer himself. ”I’m not sure I have a better solution in terms of how to get the information out there and how to notify families,” said Claire Ponder Selib, interim executive director of the National Organization for Victim Assistance. “But I can only imagine seeing a drawing by the killer of your mother or your sister or your daughter who may have died 20, 30 years ago. … Honestly, I struggle with this.” The FBI’s publication of the images was made possible by a unique set of circumstances: The killer was not only willing to confess his crimes but had a vivid memory of what his victims looked like and sufficient artistic ability to reproduce their faces.

Search is on for missing New Orleans worker — Rescue crews on Sunday searched for a worker missing in the collapse Saturday of a New Orleans hotel that was under construction. New Orleans Fire Chief Tim McConnell said they are treating their work as a rescue mission until they have evidence the missing person is dead along with two other people killed when a large part of the Hard Rock Hotel project crashed down near the city’s historic French Quarter.

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