— Bulletin wire reports

Most prolific serial killer in U.S. history —The inmate who claims to have killed more than 90 women across the country is now considered to be the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, the Federal Bureau of Investigation said. Samuel Little, who has been behind bars since 2012, told investigators last year that he was responsible for about 90 killings nationwide between 1970 and 2005. In a news release on Sunday, the FBI announced that federal crime analysts believe all of his confessions are credible, and officials have been able to verify 50 confessions so far. The 79-year-old Little is serving multiple life sentences in California. He says he strangled his 93 victims, nearly all of them women. Some of his victims were on the margins of society. Many were originally deemed overdoses, or attributed to accidental or undetermined causes. Some bodies were never found.

Chinese military could step in — Hong Kong’s leader Carrie Lam warned Tuesday that the Chinese military could step in if an uprising for democratic reforms that has rocked the city for months “becomes so bad” but reiterated the government still hopes to resolve the crisis itself. Lam urged foreign critics to accept that the four months of protests marked by escalating violence were no longer “a peaceful movement for democracy.” She said seeking Chinese intervention was provided for under Hong Kong’s constitution but that she cannot reveal under what circumstances she will do so. The protests started in June over a now-shelved extradition bill that would have allowed some criminal suspects to be sent to mainland China for trial but have since morphed into a larger anti-government movement.

Judge: Prosecutors can see Trump’s tax returns — A federal judge ruled Monday that New York City prosecutors can see President Donald Trump’s tax returns for an investigation into matters including the payment of hush money to porn star Stormy Daniels and a Playboy centerfold. U.S. District Judge Victor Marrero emphatically rejected Trump’s attempt to keep his financial records under wraps, calling the president’s broad claim of immunity from all criminal proceedings “extraordinary” and “an overreach of executive power” at odds with the Constitution. For now, at least, the tax returns remain beyond the reach of prosecutors. The president’s lawyers appealed the judge’s ruling to the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which put the matter on hold while it considers the case on an expedited basis. At issue is a request from Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. that Trump’s accounting firm turn over eight years’ worth of his business and personal tax returns dating back to 2011. Vance, a Democrat, is investigating payments made to buy the silence of Daniels and model Karen McDougal, both of whom claimed to have had affairs with the president.

U.S. diplomat’s wife killed a British teen in collision — An American woman, the wife of a U.S. diplomat, has fled the United Kingdom after killing a British teenager in a wrong-way collision, authorities said Saturday. Harry Dunn died after the woman allegedly collided with Dunn’s motorcycle. The death sparked widespread outrage after authorities revealed that Anne Sacoolas claimed diplomatic immunity under international law, allowing her to avoid prosecution and leaving British authorities and Dunn’s loved ones to demand that she return to face the consequences of her actions. In an emotional plea on Saturday, Dunn’s parents begged President Donald Trump to intervene and to send Sacoolas back to Britain. “President Trump, please listen,” Dunn’s mother, Charlotte Charles, said in an interview with Sky News. “We’re a family in ruin. We’re broken. We can’t grieve. Please, please, let her get back on a plane, come back to the U.K.” Under the 1961 Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, family members of diplomats living in other countries are covered by immunity, allowing them to avoid arrest for virtually any crime and escape civil liability in most circumstances. However, the diplomat’s home country can waive immunity — and that’s what British authorities and Dunn’s loved ones are calling for in this case.

Whistleblower’s identity could get masked — House Democrats are weighing extraordinary steps to secure testimony from a whistleblower whose complaint prompted an impeachment inquiry, masking his identity to prevent President Donald Trump’s congressional allies from exposing the individual, according to three officials familiar with the deliberations. The steps under consideration include having the whistleblower testify from a remote location and obscuring the individual’s appearance and voice. Negotiations come as House Democrats are trying to unearth as much evidence as possible.

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