— Bulletin wire reports

Who was guarding Epstein? — One of Jeffrey Epstein’s two guards the night he hanged himself in his federal jail cell in New York wasn’t a regular correctional officer, according to people familiar with the detention center, which is now under scrutiny for what Attorney General William Barr on Monday called “serious irregularities.” In addition, Epstein was supposed to have been checked on by a guard about every 30 minutes. But investigators have learned those checks weren’t done for several hours before Epstein was found, according to one of the people familiar with the episode. That person was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. A second person familiar with operations at the jail said Epstein was found with a bedsheet around his neck. That person also wasn’t authorized to disclose information about the investigation and spoke on condition of anonymity. Epstein had been placed on suicide watch after he was found in his cell a little over two weeks ago with bruises on his neck. But he had been taken off that watch at the end of July and returned to the jail’s special housing unit. He apparently killed himself Saturday.

Hong Kong showdown — Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam defended law enforcement actions Tuesday after protesters prompted an airport shutdown with calls to investigate alleged police brutality. At one of the world’s busiest airports, airlines were checking in passengers for new flights and for those unable to leave Monday when 200 flights were canceled because thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators had packed into the airport’s main terminal. Protesters have shown no sign of letting up on their campaign to force Lam’s administration to respond to their demands. No new violence was reported, although the city is on edge after more than two months of near-daily and increasingly bloody confrontations between protesters and police. Demonstrators have called for an independent inquiry into what they call the police’s abuse of power and negligence. Some protesters thrown bricks, eggs and flaming objects at police stations. Lam told reporters that dialogue would only begin when the violence stopped.

Friend of Ohio gunman may have bought body armor — A longtime friend of the Dayton, Ohio, gunman bought the body armor, a 100-round magazine and a key part of the gun used in the attack, but there’s no indication the man knew his friend was planning a massacre, federal agents said Monday. Ethan Kollie told investigators he also helped Connor Betts assemble the AR-15-style weapon about 10 weeks ago, according to a court document. Kollie first spoke with investigators just hours after the assault and later said he bought the body armor, the magazine and the rifle’s upper receiver and kept the equipment at his apartment so Betts’ parents would not find it, the court filing said. Federal investigators emphasized that there was no evidence that Kollie knew how Betts would use the equipment or that Kollie intentionally took part in the planning. The accusations came as prosecutors unsealed charges against Kollie that were unrelated to the Aug. 4 shooting. Early that day, Betts opened fire in a popular entertainment district, killing his sister and eight others. Police killed Betts within 30 seconds outside a crowded bar, and authorities have said hundreds more people may have died if Betts had gotten inside.

Canadian police: Teen fugitives took their own lives — Canadian police said Monday they believe two teenage fugitives suspected of killing a North Carolina woman, her Australian boyfriend and another man took their own lives amid a nationwide manhunt. The Manitoba Medical Examiner completed the autopsies and confirmed that two bodies found last week in dense bush in northern Manitoba province were indeed Kam McLeod, 19, and Bryer ­Schmegelsky, 18. A police statement said they appeared to die by suicide. McLeod and Schmegelsky were charged with second-degree murder in the death of Leonard Dyck, a University of British Columbia lecturer whose body was found July 19 along a highway in British Columbia. They were also suspects in the fatal shootings of Lucas Fowler and Chynna Deese, whose bodies were found July 15 along the Alaska Highway about 300 miles from where Dyck was killed.

Unrelenting heat wave — Forecasters are warning about days of scorching, dangerous heat gripping a wide swath of the South and Midwest, where the heat index on Monday eclipsed 120 degrees in one Mississippi town and climbed nearly that high in others. Parts of 13 states were under heat advisories, from Texas, Louisiana and Florida in the South to Missouri and Illinois in the Midwest, the National Weather Service reported. “It feels like hell is what it feels like,” said Junae Brooks, who runs a grocery store in Mississippi.

Cosby appeal — A Pennsylvania appeals court on Monday questioned why actor Bill Cosby never got a supposed nonprosecution agreement in writing as his lawyers asked the panel to overturn his sexual assault conviction. Cosby, 82, is serving a three- to 10-year prison term for drugging and molesting a woman at his home in what became the first celebrity trial of the #MeToo era. The three-judge panel asked why Cosby’s top-shelf lawyers didn’t follow the norm and get an immunity agreement in writing, and approved by a judge, when accuser Andrea Constand first came forward in 2005. Cosby’s lawyers have argued he relied on the promise before giving testimony, which proved incriminating when it was unsealed a decade later.

23830595