ODF fire meeting

More than 150 attended an Oregon Department of Forestry meeting August 10 in Redmond.

More than 150 people showed up at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds last week to hear why the Oregon Department of Forestry withdrew its wildfire risk map after public outcry.

The map assessed the wildfire burn risk of the “wildland-urban interface” — areas across the state that meet certain population density criteria without being as tightly populated as a city. Oregon State University researchers developed risk factors for these areas based on variables like building density, surrounding vegetation and historic wildfire patterns.

Sign up for our Daily Headlines newsletter

(5) comments

103068

Is there an editor for headlines? Anyone who knows what a misplaced modifier is? Try this: "After pulling controversial fire risk map, ODF listens to 150 citizens." OR "150 show up to ask why ODF pulled a controversial map." See? 150 people did not pull that map, contrary to your headline.

knowitall

I’m less concerned with fire risk on my property than I’m with a lack of federal and state forest management, where large wildfires can start and spread onto private land. Let’s start managing and logging the Forest so it’s not overgrown like it is now!

Moderate

I thought that a major risk factor was crown fires. Wouldn't it make sense that an area that already burned would be considered lower risk sense crown fires are no longer possible?

It would be great if the Bulletin could have a series on how fire behavior has changed in the last few decades and what that means for future mitigation strategies. I'd also like the Bulletin to include information on how Bend is preparing for a close in wildfire and what roads we should take to evacuate.

Transitory Inflation

'The Detroit Lake area — which burned to the ground in 2020 and is now a flammable collection of toothpick-like trees — is in the green zone, which designates an area least at risk.'

Why wouldn't this be true? There won't be enough fuel for a wildfire to burn for a half century.

58909

“Oregon State University researchers developed risk factors for these areas based on variables like building density, surrounding vegetation and historic wildfire patterns.” Was OSU data corroborated by insurance company fire risk assessment?

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.