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Heads Up

COTA Movie Night “Divided” — In 2017, the female duo of Rickie Cotter and Lee Craigie raced the Tour Divide together, a 2745 mile self-supported mountain bike race from Canada to the Mexican border. Shot entirely using a Go Pro and an iPhone, this is a heart-warming and funny documentary about the journey of two friends. This film screens at 8 p.m. Thursday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. $6 cash only at the door. 40 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from event website

“Friendsgiving” —Who better to kick off Thanksgiving with than Monica, Rachel, Phoebe, Chandler, Ross and Joey!? Watch as Monica puts a turkey on her head, Rachel makes a curious trifle cake, Ross reveals an old secret, Chandler declares his love for Monica and Phoebe exposes something about Chandler’s canine allergy. A special two-day screening event of eight turkey-themed episodes. This film screens at 7 p.m. Sunday and 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. Monday at Regal Cinemas Old Mill 16 & IMAX. $14. 125 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Knives Out” Early Access Screening — When renowned crime novelist Harlan Thrombey (Christopher Plummer) is found dead at his estate just after his 85th birthday, the inquisitive and debonair Detective Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig) is mysteriously enlisted to investigate. From Harlan’s dysfunctional family to his devoted staff, Blanc sifts through a web of red herrings and self-serving lies to uncover the truth behind Harlan’s untimely death. This film screens at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Regal Cinemas Old Mill 16 & IMAX. $14. 125 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Men in Black International” —The Men in Black have always protected the Earth from the scum of the universe. In this new adventure, they tackle their biggest threat to date: a mole in the Men in Black organization. This film screens at 12:45 p.m. Tuesday at the Bend Senior Center. Free. 114 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

Metropolitan Opera Live “Akhnaten” —Countertenor Anthony Roth Costanzo headlines American composer Philip Glass’s transcendent contemporary creation, with Karen Kamensek conducting. Phelim McDermott’s stunning production employs a virtuosic company of acrobats and jugglers to conjure a mystical reimagining of ancient Egypt. This film livestreams at 9:55 a.m. Saturday at Regal Cinemas Old Mill 16 & IMAX. $24 adults, $22 senior $18 children. 211 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Never Surrender: A Galaxy Quest Documentary” —As the cult classic nears its 20th anniversary “Never Surrender: A Galaxy Quest Documentary” explores how the science-fiction comedy became an enduring fan favorite, a movie that helped launch the sci-fi- and fantasy-driven movie and TV industry that dominates global entertainment today. This film screens at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Regal Cinemas Old Mill 16 & IMAX. $16. 95 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

Reel Rock 14 —The Reel Rock Film Tour returns this fall with a new collection of world premiere films. In “The High Road,” Nina Williams tests herself on some of the highest, most difficult boulder problems ever climbed. In “United States of Joe’s,” climbers collide with a conservative coal mining community in rural Utah, to surprising results. And in “The Nose Speed Record,” legends Tommy Caldwell and Alex Honnold battle Yosemite climbers in a high stakes race for greatness. This film screens at 4:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Saturday at the Tower Theatre in Bend. $7 plus fees. 101 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“The Santa Clause” —When a man inadvertently makes Santa fall off of his roof on Christmas Eve, he finds himself magically recruited to take his place. This film screens at 7 p.m. Friday at the Tower Theatre in Bend. $10-$15 plus fees. 97 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

WHAT’S NEW

“21 Bridges” (2.5 stars) “21 Bridges” will win no prizes for originality or twists. (It won't win any prizes for anything, to be honest.) But it’s made well enough. In other words, “21 Bridges” gets the job done. So does Boseman, who is satisfying to watch, even when he has little to do except the right thing. Dre isn’t tarnished or tainted in any way. He’s not guilt-ridden, seeking redemption or complicated. “21 Bridges” might be a teeny bit more interesting if he were. 99 minutes. (R)

— Michael O’ Sullivan,

The Washington Post

“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” (4 stars) Balancing pathos, humor and Rogers’ practice of radical Christian love and acceptance, director Heller lends “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” a light touch and depth of feeling that play off each other in near-perfect balance. The film’s finest scene is the work of a filmmaker of superb judgment and confidence, who knows exactly what her movie is about: not a cuddly figure from baby boomers’ collective past or the “emotional arc” of a flawed protagonist, but those moments of grace — vagrant, unearned, numinous and liberating — that can turn everyday life into a miracle. 108 minutes. (PG)

— Ann Hornaday,

The Washington Post

“Frozen II” (2.5 stars) “Frozen II” merely drifts pleasantly in and out of our consciousness, a diverting way to spend an hour and 43 minutes with some great tunes and lovely snowy landscapes to ogle. It will of course be seared into the brains of parents and kids after their millionth viewing. And it’s enjoyable and funny enough to be tolerated that many times, which seems to be what it’s designed for. 103 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh,

Tribune News Service

“Knives Out” (star rating unavailable) — When renowned crime novelist Harlan Thrombey (Christopher Plummer) is found dead at his estate just after his 85th birthday, the inquisitive and debonair Detective Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig) is mysteriously enlisted to investigate. From Harlan’s dysfunctional family to his devoted staff, Blanc sifts through a web of red herrings and self-serving lies to uncover the truth behind Harlan’s untimely death. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Queen and Slim”(star rating unavailable) — A couple’s first date takes an unexpected turn when a police officer pulls them over.. 132 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“The Report” (3 stars) Adam Driver does powerful work as a Senate investigator looking into post-9/11 torture tactics sanctioned by the U.S. government. This is a smart, solid and engrossing paper-chase story about one man’s dogged determination. 118 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper,

Chicago Sun-Times

STILL SHOWING

“Abominable” (3.5 stars) It can be a rare occurrence to find a kid-friendly animated film these days that actually surprises and delights. Dreamworks’ “Abominable,” does indeed surprise and delight, all while following a familiar hero’s journey tale that borrows from favorite friendly creature films. “Abominable” doesn’t change this formula; it just executes it exceptionally well, with a fresh perspective and plenty of magic. 97 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh,

Tribune News Service

“The Addams Family” (2 stars) A computer-animated comedy mires the eccentric kinfolk from Charles Addams’ cartoons in a breezy and intermittently funny but not particularly original story. The often wince-inducing humor is offset by heavy-handed message-sending about tolerance and acceptance and learning how to live and let live. 105 minutes (PG)

— Richard Roeper,

Chicago Tribune

“Charlie’s Angels” (3 stars) With the help of co-writers Evan Spiliotopoulos and David Auburn, Elizabeth Banks has dusted off the lady spy franchise that was once a cheesy ‘70s sitcom, and of course, a McG-directed blockbuster from the era of problematic feminism known as the early 2000s. They’ve given it an empowering update, full of therapy-sanctioned self-acceptance language and social justice-oriented clients (not that there’s anything wrong with that), but the formula remains the same: babes kicking butt. What’s not to like? 118 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh,

Tribune News Service

“The Current War: Director’s Cut” (3 stars) Director Alfonso Gomez-Rejon sweats like crazy to visually energize a story largely about alternating current versus direct current, embodied by the driven, competitive but very different inventors and industrialists at the story’s center It’s strenuous, though the settings and production designs shine.. 107 minutes. (PG-13)

— Michael Phillips,

Chicago Tribune

“Doctor Sleep” (2.5 stars) — The cultural grip of “The Shining” has such a stranglehold on Mike Flanagan’s adaptation of “Doctor Sleep,” a sequel of sorts, that it nearly chokes the life out of it. Author Stephen King’s take on what happened after “Here’s Johnny” on that snowy mountain is a fascinating follow-up involving an alcoholic Danny Torrance (Ewan McGregor) learning to harness his “shine” for good, helping a young girl (Kyliegh Curran) fight a terrifying death cult, the True Knot. That’s all present in Flanagan’s film, and it’s the most engrossing aspect, comprising the first two-thirds of the film. It’s when Flanagan’s “Doctor Sleep” is dragged back to the Overlook Hotel that this adaptation loses consciousness. 151 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh,

Tribune News Service

“Ford v Ferrari” (3.5 stars) “Ford v Ferrari,” James Mangold’s meaty, muscular slice of mainstream movie entertainment, wastes no time getting off to the races. Viscerally, it’s nothing less than a straight thrill ride. Bale, predictably, is the heart and soul of “Ford v Ferrari,” rangy and wiry, his twitchy, obsessive performance is deeply humane, a portrayal of a man who may not have been the picture-perfect company spokesman, but one whose unique life experiences gave him his incredible skill. That’s something corporate strategies could never snuff out. 152 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh

Tribune News Service

“The Good Liar” (2.5 stars) Based on novelist Nicholas Searle’s best-selling 2016 debut, “The Good Liar” is a silly breeze of a movie starring two of Britain’s finest actors, each having a blast playing cat-and-mouse with the other. 109 minutes. (R)

— Hau Chu,

The Washington Post

“Harriet” (3 stars) Compact and focused, Erivo plays Tubman with a combination of athleticism and somberness that gives the lie to the “sweet little old lady” persona some might associate with the heroine of schoolbooks and postage stamps. Peppered with tense action sequences, “Harriet” is the kind of instructional, no-nonsense biopic that may not take many artistic risks or sophisticated stylistic departures but manages to benefit from that lack of pretension. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Ann Hornaday,

The Washington Post

“Jojo Rabbit” (3.5 stars) Writer-director Taika Waititi delivers a timely, anti-hate fractured fairy tale AND turns in hilarious work as Adolf Hitler, imaginary friend to a 10-year-old German boy near the end of World War II. No, really. 108 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper,

Chicago-Sun Times

“Joker” (2 stars) “Joker” is, so monotonously grandiose and full of its own pretensions that it winds up feeling puny and predictable. Like the anti-hero at its center, it’s a movie trying so hard to be capital-b Big that it can’t help looking small. 122 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday,

The Washington Post

“Last Christmas” (2.5 stars) — Arguably two of the biggest stars of the moment, Emilia Clarke and Henry Golding are Kate and Tom, who meet by chance outside the Christmas shop where Kate works dressed as an elf. Kate and Tom are slightly maddening in their extreme quirks for the first half of the film. But that leaves them room to grow and change. And thankfully, they do. Director Paul Feig has built an interesting body of work over the past couple of years. While “Last Christmas” feels more like an Emma Thompson (screenplay co-writer) film than a Feig film (rapidly wordy, delightfully goofy), he brings a swift bounciness to the material. 102 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh,

Tribune News Service

“The Lighthouse” (3.5 stars) A drifter (Robert Pattinson) contracts for a month-long gig on an isolated, storm-swept island as an apprentice for a crabby old lighthouse keeper (Willem Dafoe). The actors are equally brilliant in this visually striking, claustrophobic, black-and-white horror show. 108 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper,

Chicago-Sun Times

“The Lion King” (3.5 stars) Jon Favreau’s live-action/CGI remake of the Disney animated classic “The Lion King” is a solid and at times stunningly beautiful film with breathtaking attention to detail. The insanely talented duo of Donald Glover and Beyonce are great as Simba and Nala, Billy Eichner and Seth Rogen kill as Timon and Pumbaa, and the CGI version of Scar (Chiwetel Ejiofor) is a work of art. This “Lion King” rules. And roars. 118 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper,

Chicago Sun-Times

“Maleficent: Mistress of Evil” (1.5 stars) Unfortunately, there is no central relationship here to replace the one in “Maleficent,” — hate gradually giving way to love — between Maleficent and Aurora. In its place, “Mistress of Evil” substitutes the schematics of military battle for character development. Unlike the first film, there’s no one to care about. And Jolie, as good as she is, comes off as just another complicated costumed crusader, one more comic book baddie.. 118 minutes. (PG)

— Michael O’ Sullivan,

The Washington Post

“Midway” (2.5 stars) Writer Wes Tooke and director Roland Emmerich take a big bite of World War II history in “Midway.” We follow hotshot pilot Dick Best (Ed Skrein), a man known to fly like “he doesn’t care if he comes home.” He loses his Naval Academy pal (Alexander Ludwig) in Pearl Harbor, which stokes his taste for revenge. Dick is ambitious, a family man, and he flies like a bat out of hell. Skrein is a capable enough actor, but there’s a sly element to him that makes him an odd choice to play this swaggering American hero. And he feels like a mismatch with Mandy Moore as his wife. 138 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh,

Tribune News Service

“Motherless Brooklyn” (3 stars) With this 1950s period piece, writer-director Edward Norton delivers a richly layered, well-photographed film-noir mystery about a lonely private detective with Tourette’s syndrome. As the star, he proves a great actor can make unfortunate choices and deliver an uneven performance. 144 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper,

Chicago Sun-Times

“Official Secrets” (3 stars) Keira Knightley spends a lot of time looking tense and nauseous in “Official Secrets,” wherein she plays real-life whistleblower Katharine Gun. The film revisits Gun’s story with an emphasis on the alternately clubby and labyrinthine institutions she came up against, as well as the emotional damage she incurred when she made a decision that some viewed as heroic and others as a betrayal. 112 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday

The Washington Post

“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” (4 stars) In a movie filled with sparkling acting, Brad Pitt dominates as the best friend and former stunt double of a fading TV star (Leonardo DiCaprio). Quentin Tarantino’s deeply personal, darkly funny period piece, set in 1969, brilliantly and sometimes outrageously mashes up real-life events and characters with pure fiction. 159 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper,

Chicago Sun-Times

“Pain and Glory” (4 stars) “Pain and Glory,” is a kind of loose self-portrait. There are other direct references to director Pedro Almodóvar’s life, but the story is in no way a straightforward autobiography There is so much more going on in “Pain and Glory” that it’s hard to enumerate it all. Although much of it takes place in flashbacks the film really takes shape in the space between the adult Salvador’s life and his childhood memories. This sets up a lovely payoff at the very end of the film, in which the power of art to reconcile the past is acknowledged as the most powerful intoxicant there is. 113 minutes. (R)

— Michael O’ Sullivan,

The Washington Post

“Parasite” (4 stars) One of the best movies of 2019, Bong Joon Ho’s story of a rich family and a poor one living parallel and drastically different lives in South Korea is a film of dramatic power, innovative comedy, romantic poetry and melancholy beauty. 132 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper,

Chicago Sun-Times

“Playing with Fire” (1.5 stars)The creators of “Playing With Fire,” a clodhopping comedy about California wildfire “smoke jumpers,” built in little pauses after many of the film’s sight gags and verbal jokes, presumably to accommodate audience laughter. Bad idea. With horrific wildfires scorching California, the timing of this firefighter comedy also seems off. It might inspire empathy, if only it were actually funny. 96 minutes (PG)

— Jane Horwitz,

Special to the Washington Post

“Terminator: Dark Fate” (2.5 stars) A fairly entertaining sequel to James Cameron’s low-budget, high-yield “The Terminator” and the hugely expensive and enjoyable “Terminator 2: Judgement Day” . It has zero narrative connection to any of the interim lame-o “Terminator” movies. Storywise we’re coming straight from “Judgement Day,” where the machine-learning apocalypse was averted thanks to Sarah Connor, played by Linda Hamilton . 128 minutes. (R)

— Michael Phillips,

Chicago Tribune

“Zombieland: Double Tap” (1.5 stars) Along with zombie heads, “Double Tap” bludgeons the stale jokes about minivans and ditzy blondes to goo. In this apocalyptic wasteland, they dehumanize anyone but themselves. It feels like any new ideas were jettisoned for the same old schtick. “Zombieland” may have helped to give birth to the zomb-aissance, but “Double Tap” just might be the kill shot.. 99 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh,

Tribune News Service

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