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“The Collective” — Adventuring to undiscovered peaks together, plotting midnight-raids on inner-city handrails, lapping your home run until that last ray of sunshine disappears behind a distant ridge... Skiing is Collective. Some call it a tribe mentality, others call it a shared sense of purpose. This film is our definition, written by a diverse team, each with their own ideas, their own forms of expression. This film screens at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday at Sunriver Brewing Co. Galveston Pub in Bend. Free. Runtime unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Elf” — After inadvertently wreaking havoc on the elf community due to his ungainly size, a man raised as an elf at the North Pole is sent to the U.S. in search of his true identity. This film screens at 1 p.m. Saturday at Regal Cinemas Old Mill 16 & IMAX. $5. 97 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from regalcinemas.com

“Gauguin in Tahiti: Paradise Lost” — In 1891 Gauguin left Marseille for the Pacific, marking the beginning of a journey towards the essence of life and art, and forging his destiny as one of the greatest modern painters who ever lived. “Gauguin in Tahiti: Paradise Lost” will take us on the trail of a story that has become myth. Through Tahiti and Marquesas Islands in French Polynesia, we will experience the landscapes that inspired Gauguin, in the places where he built houses with bamboo and leaves, and discovered light and colors which changed his painting forever. This film screens at 7:15 p.m. Tuesday at Sisters Movie House. $15. 98 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from sistersmoviehouse.com

“Love and Mercy: Faustina” — In 1931, Jesus appeared to Faustina Kowalska as the King of Mercy. Aided by scientific analysis, the film reveals how the Divine Mercy image and the Shroud of Turin were compared to each other to stunning conclusions. Dramatically recreated scenes trace the story of the origins of the image and how the devotion to Divine Mercy was born and spread throughout the world despite a ban of the devotion by the Catholic Church. This film screens at 7 p.m. Monday at Regal Cinemas Old Mill 16 & IMAX. $12.50 adults, $9.75 children and seniors. 120 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

Metropolitan Opera Live “Akhnaten” — Countertenor Anthony Roth Costanzo headlines American composer Philip Glass’s transcendent contemporary creation, with Karen Kamensek conducting. Phelim McDermott’s stunning production employs a virtuosic company of acrobats and jugglers to conjure a mystical reimagining of ancient Egypt. This film screens at 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Cinemas Old Mill 16 & IMAX. $24 adults, $22 seniors, $18 children. 211 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” — It’s Christmas time and the Griswolds are preparing for a family seasonal celebration, but things never run smoothly for Clark, his wife Ellen and their two kids. Clark’s continual bad luck is worsened by his obnoxious family guests, but he manages to keep going knowing that his Christmas bonus is due soon. This film screens at 7 p.m. Friday at the Tower Theatre. $10-$15 plus fees. 97 minutes (PG-13)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

Warren Miller’s “Timeless” — Much of the world has changed since Warren Miller started making ski films in 1949, but the passion of snowriders across the globe has stayed the same. “Timeless” emulates the enduring spirit of winter and gives a deserving nod to the past seven decades of ski cinematography, while looking toward the future. Get ready to kick off your winter with a cast of fresh faces, inspirational locales, plenty of laughs and camaraderie, and a classic blend of the new and old. This film screens at 7 p.m. Saturday at Sisters High School. $15 general admission, $10 seniors and children 12 and under. Run time not available. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“When Harry Met Sally...” 30th Anniversary — Harry Burns (Billy Crystal) and Sally Albright (Meg Ryan) meet when they share a car on a trip from Chicago to New York right after both graduate from college. As the two build their lives and careers in Manhattan, they find love and heartache — with other people — but their paths continue to cross and their friendship continues to grow over the years... until they confront the decision whether to let their friendship develop into a romance. This film screens at 4 p.m. Sunday and 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tuesday at Regal Cinemas Old Mill 16 & IMAX. $12.50. 100 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Honey Land” (star rating unavailable) — The last female bee-hunter in Europe must save the bees and return the natural balance in Honeyland, when a family of nomadic beekeepers invade her land and threaten her livelihood. 90 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Knives Out” () At the heart of “Knives Out” is a message about the corrosive, corrupting nature of inherited wealth and what it means to be deserving of the riches a single person accumulates over a lifetime or more. What renders someone more deserving, their bloodline or the way they treat others? What would the world be like if the daughters of immigrants, if women of color held economic power? It’s a cunning, stunning little moral director Rian Johnson tucks away in his star-studded mystery movie, one that makes it that much more interesting and worth watching. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh,Tribune News Service

“Queen and Slim” () In a Cleveland diner called the Fortyniner, two people who’ve just met on Tinder share a table. While there is no romantic equivalent of a gold rush in progress, something’s in the air. Death hangs heavily over “Queen & Slim.” So does love, and a fierce, reckless embrace of life — black lives, specifically, but as with any vital film, the specifics point to more than one story or set of circumstances. 132 minutes. (R)

— Michael Phillips,Chicago Tribune

“21 Bridges” () “21 Bridges” will win no prizes for originality or twists. (It won’t win any prizes for anything, to be honest.) But it’s made well enough. In other words, “21 Bridges” gets the job done. So does Boseman, who is satisfying to watch, even when he has little to do except the right thing. Dre isn’t tarnished or tainted in any way. He’s not guilt-ridden, seeking redemption or complicated. “21 Bridges” might be a teeny bit more interesting if he were. 99 minutes. (R)

— Michael O’ Sullivan,The Washington Post

“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” () Balancing pathos, humor and Rogers’ practice of radical Christian love and acceptance, director Heller lends “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” a light touch and depth of feeling that play off each other in near-perfect balance. The film’s finest scene is the work of a filmmaker of superb judgment and confidence, who knows exactly what her movie is about: not a cuddly figure from baby boomers’ collective past or the “emotional arc” of a flawed protagonist, but those moments of grace — vagrant, unearned, numinous and liberating — that can turn everyday life into a miracle. 108 minutes. (PG)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Abominable” () It can be a rare occurrence to find a kid-friendly animated film these days that actually surprises and delights. Dreamworks’ “Abominable,” does indeed surprise and delight, all while following a familiar hero’s journey tale that borrows from favorite friendly creature films. “Abominable” doesn’t change this formula; it just executes it exceptionally well, with a fresh perspective and plenty of magic. 97 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Charlie’s Angels” () With the help of co-writers Evan Spiliotopoulos and David Auburn, Elizabeth Banks has dusted off the lady spy franchise that was once a cheesy ‘70s sitcom, and of course, a McG-directed blockbuster from the era of problematic feminism known as the early 2000s. They’ve given it an empowering update, full of therapy-sanctioned self-acceptance language and social justice-oriented clients (not that there’s anything wrong with that), but the formula remains the same: babes kicking butt. What’s not to like? 118 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Ford v Ferrari” () “Ford v Ferrari,” James Mangold’s meaty, muscular slice of mainstream movie entertainment, wastes no time getting off to the races. Viscerally, it’s nothing less than a straight thrill ride. Bale, predictably, is the heart and soul of “Ford v Ferrari,” rangy and wiry, his twitchy, obsessive performance is deeply humane, a portrayal of a man who may not have been the picture-perfect company spokesman, but one whose unique life experiences gave him his incredible skill. That’s something corporate strategies could never snuff out. 152 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Frozen II” () “Frozen II” merely drifts pleasantly in and out of our consciousness, a diverting way to spend an hour and 43 minutes with some great tunes and lovely snowy landscapes to ogle. It will of course be seared into the brains of parents and kids after their millionth viewing. And it’s enjoyable and funny enough to be tolerated that many times, which seems to be what it’s designed for. 103 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Good Liar” () Based on novelist Nicholas Searle’s best-selling 2016 debut, “The Good Liar” is a silly breeze of a movie starring two of Britain’s finest actors, each having a blast playing cat-and-mouse with the other. 109 minutes. (R)

— Hau Chu, The Washington Post

“Jojo Rabbit” () Writer-director Taika Waititi delivers a timely, anti-hate fractured fairy tale AND turns in hilarious work as Adolf Hitler, imaginary friend to a 10-year-old German boy near the end of World War II. No, really. 108 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago-Sun Times

“Joker” () “Joker” is, so monotonously grandiose and full of its own pretensions that it winds up feeling puny and predictable. Like the anti-hero at its center, it’s a movie trying so hard to be capital-b Big that it can’t help looking small. 122 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“The Lighthouse” () A drifter (Robert Pattinson) contracts for a month-long gig on an isolated, storm-swept island as an apprentice for a crabby old lighthouse keeper (Willem Dafoe). The actors are equally brilliant in this visually striking, claustrophobic, black-and-white horror show. 108 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago-Sun Times

“Maleficent: Mistress of Evil” () Unfortunately, there is no central relationship here to replace the one in “Maleficent,” — hate gradually giving way to love — between Maleficent and Aurora. In its place, “Mistress of Evil” substitutes the schematics of military battle for character development. Unlike the first film, there’s no one to care about. And Jolie, as good as she is, comes off as just another complicated costumed crusader, one more comic book baddie.. 118 minutes. (PG)

— Michael O’ Sullivan, The Washington Post

“Midway” () Writer Wes Tooke and director Roland Emmerich take a big bite of World War II history in “Midway.” We follow hotshot pilot Dick Best (Ed Skrein), a man known to fly like “he doesn’t care if he comes home.” He loses his Naval Academy pal (Alexander Ludwig) in Pearl Harbor, which stokes his taste for revenge. Dick is ambitious, a family man, and he flies like a bat out of hell. Skrein is a capable enough actor, but there’s a sly element to him that makes him an odd choice to play this swaggering American hero. And he feels like a mismatch with Mandy Moore as his wife. 138 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” () In a movie filled with sparkling acting, Brad Pitt dominates as the best friend and former stunt double of a fading TV star (Leonardo DiCaprio). Quentin Tarantino’s deeply personal, darkly funny period piece, set in 1969, brilliantly and sometimes outrageously mashes up real-life events and characters with pure fiction. 159 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Parasite” () One of the best movies of 2019, Bong Joon Ho’s story of a rich family and a poor one living parallel and drastically different lives in South Korea is a film of dramatic power, innovative comedy, romantic poetry and melancholy beauty. 132 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

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