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Bolshoi Ballet: “Giselle” — In this new production, the leading choreographer Alexei Ratmansky gives an unprecedented perspective to one of the oldest and greatest works of the classical repertoire, offering the public the opportunity to discover again this iconic ballet that addresses the universal romantic themes. This film screens at 12:55 p.m. Sunday at Regal Cinemas Old Mill 16 & IMAX. $18. 150 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

COTA Redmond Movie Night “Deathgrip” — For the last two years, Fairclough and Porter have traveled to every inhabited continent on the planet with a simple goal: to show the world a new vision of mountain biking. Joined on this quest by a collection of the most progressive and influential riders that this generation of mountain biking has to offer, Fairclough and Porter have embarked on an all-out assault on the bleeding edge of the sport’s limits. This film screens at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Silverleaf Cafe at Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond. Free. 53 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Instant Family” — A couple find themselves in over their heads when they foster three children. The screening will also feature several organizations with information on becoming a foster parent. This film screens at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Sisters Movie House. Free. 118 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Klunkerz: A Film About Mountain Bikes” — In the late 1960s through the 1970s a group of cyclists in Northern California’s Marin County turned the bicycle world upside-down by taking their adventures off-road. This film screens at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at Crooked River Brewing in Prineville. Free. 83 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“The Peanut Butter Falcon” — An adventure story that begins when Zak, a young man with Down syndrome, runs away from the nursing home where he lives to chase his dream of becoming a professional wrestler by attending the wrestling school The Salt Water Redneck. Through circumstances beyond their control Tyler, a small-time outlaw on the run, becomes Zak’s unlikely coach and ally. Together they wind through deltas, elude capture, drink whisky, find God, catch fish and convince Eleanor, a kind nursing home employee with a story of her own, to join them on their journey. This film screens at 7:20 p.m. Friday at the Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex. Free. 97 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Where’d You Go Bernadette” — A loving mom becomes compelled to reconnect with her creative passions after years of sacrificing herself for her family. Her leap of faith takes her on an epic adventure that jump-starts her life and leads to her triumphant rediscovery. This film screens at 12:45 p.m. Tuesday at the Bend Senior Center. Free. 109 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“The Gentlemen” () It can be easy to be swept away by all the beautiful people, unreliable narrators, classic rock needle drops, wild costumes and regional accents. Ritchie still has undeniable attitude and swagger in spades. But kick the tires and you’ll start to realize the story’s a lemon. It’s fairly simple underneath the layers of unreliable narrators and unnecessarily extraneous plot twists, which end up having all the intrigue of a potato. 113 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Turning” (star rating unavailable) A young governess is hired by a man who has become responsible for his young nephew and niece after the deaths of their parents. A modern take on Henry James’ novella “The Turn of the Screw”. 94 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“The Last Full Measure” () What one walks away with from “The Last Full Measure” isn’t necessarily the heroism of Pitsenbarger, though his personal sacrifice was immense. What the film reveals is the deep shame and trauma vets contend with, as survivors who made it out alive, as men who are fallible and flawed who did their best under extreme violence and duress and have to live with those choices for the rest of their lives. What “The Last Full Measure” demonstrates is how powerful it can be to shed light on these experiences, through testimony, bearing witness and yes, ceremonial recognition. 110 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Song of Names” (star rating unavailable) Several years after his childhood friend, a violin prodigy, disappears on the eve of his first solo concert, an Englishman travels throughout Europe to find him. 113. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“WBCN and the American Revolution” (star rating unavailable) The amazing, untold story of the radical underground radio station WBCN-FM, set against the dazzling and profound social, political and cultural changes that took place in Boston and nationally during the late-1960s and early-70s. Told through the actual sights, sounds and stories of a compelling cast of characters who connected through the radio station, exploding music and countercultural scenes, militant anti-war activism, civil rights struggles and the emerging women’s and LGBTQ-liberation movements.

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“1917” () A visceral look at WWI from the everyday men who fought through it. This expertly shot film takes the audience on a real time ride through the trenches, No-Man’s Land and beyond in an epically scaled journey to save thousands of soldiers. 119 minutes. (R)

— Makenzie Whittle, The Bulletin

“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” () Balancing pathos, humor and Rogers’ practice of radical Christian love and acceptance, director Heller lends “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” a light touch and depth of feeling that play off each other in near-perfect balance. The film’s finest scene is the work of a filmmaker of superb judgment and confidence, who knows exactly what her movie is about: not a cuddly figure from baby boomers’ collective past or the “emotional arc” of a flawed protagonist, but those moments of grace — vagrant, unearned, numinous and liberating — that can turn everyday life into a miracle. 108 minutes. (PG)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Bad Boys for Life” () After turning in the first two greatly beloved, operatically souped-up action opuses in the “Bad Boys” franchise, everyone’s favorite gearhead maximalist auteur Michael Bay is no longer behind the camera for the third, “Bad Boys for Life.” Not to worry though, as Belgian filmmaking duo Adil El Arbi and Bilall Fallah, clearly devoted students of Bay’s style, craft a wonderful facsimile of his greatest hits, from his swirling low-angle dolly shots to capturing the glorious clash of sunset and neon that screams Miami, and it’s a hoot for fans of the franchise. 123 minutes (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Bombshell” () “Bombshell” depicts the corporate culture of sexual harassment at Fox News through the perspectives of three women: star anchor Megyn Kelly (a husky-voiced Theron, almost unrecognizable), “Fox & Friends” star Gretchen Carlson (Nicole Kidman) and a fictional composite associate producer named Katya Pospisil (Margot Robbie). This is the story behind the toppling of Roger Ailes (played by John Lithgow, in a fat suit). The question, ultimately, is whether “Bombshell” ought to have spun quite so snappy a movie out of such a story. It does cartwheels to make a vile tale compelling, and it can feel like a parade of starry impressions rather than something genuine. (Best of the bunch is Alanna Ubach’s Jeanine Pirro.) But to quote Ailes in the film, “It’s a visual medium.” 108 minutes. (R)

— Jake Coyle, AP Film Writer

“Dolittle” () Between Robert Downey Jr.’s muddled accent, paper thin characters, bad CGI and little plot, “Dolittle” is doomed to the same fate of it’s 1967 predecessor. 101 minutes (PG)

— Makenzie Whittle, The Bulletin

“Ford v Ferrari” () “Ford v Ferrari,” James Mangold’s meaty, muscular slice of mainstream movie entertainment, wastes no time getting off to the races. Viscerally, it’s nothing less than a straight thrill ride. Bale, predictably, is the heart and soul of “Ford v Ferrari,” rangy and wiry, his twitchy, obsessive performance is deeply humane, a portrayal of a man who may not have been the picture-perfect company spokesman, but one whose unique life experiences gave him his incredible skill. That’s something corporate strategies could never snuff out. 152 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Frozen II” () “Frozen II” merely drifts pleasantly in and out of our consciousness, a diverting way to spend an hour and 43 minutes with some great tunes and lovely snowy landscapes to ogle. It will of course be seared into the brains of parents and kids after their millionth viewing. And it’s enjoyable and funny enough to be tolerated that many times, which seems to be what it’s designed for. 103 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Jojo Rabbit” () Writer-director Taika Waititi delivers a timely, anti-hate fractured fairy tale AND turns in hilarious work as Adolf Hitler, imaginary friend to a 10-year-old German boy near the end of World War II. No, really. 108 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago-Sun Times

“Joker” () “Joker” is, so monotonously grandiose and full of its own pretensions that it winds up feeling puny and predictable. Like the anti-hero at its center, it’s a movie trying so hard to be capital-b Big that it can’t help looking small. 122 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Jumanji: The Next Level” () The pleasures of “Jumanji: The Next Level” are not visual or story-based, as they revolve around the ability of each of our stars and their abilities to do impressions. And the story offers up a few chances for the characters to avatar swap, showing off the actors’ abilities to embody the different jock/nerd/cheerleader/cantankerous grandpa personas. Once again, this is a one-joke movie, but for the time being, that joke still has some tread on the tires, especially with such charming stars and some light innovation. It remains to be seen how much mileage this franchise can sustain on charm alone, however. 123 minutes (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Just Mercy” () The real story of civil rights attorney Bryan Stevenson and his fight to keep an innocent black man from being executed. It is urgent, searing and powerful, led by a first-rate cast. Though it portrays events more than 25 years ago, it is very much a film of 2019. If there’s one weakness in the film, it’s that it sometimes veers into hagiography. The naturalism of the cinematography and acting sometimes clashes with dialogue that seems overly polished. 137 minutes. (PG-13)

— Mark Kennedy, AP Entertainment Writer

“Knives Out” () At the heart of “Knives Out” is a message about the corrosive, corrupting nature of inherited wealth and what it means to be deserving of the riches a single person accumulates over a lifetime or more. What renders someone more deserving, their bloodline or the way they treat others? What would the world be like if the daughters of immigrants, if women of color held economic power? It’s a cunning, stunning little moral director Rian Johnson tucks away in his star-studded mystery movie, one that makes it that much more interesting and worth watching. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Lighthouse” () A drifter (Robert Pattinson) contracts for a month-long gig on an isolated, storm-swept island as an apprentice for a crabby old lighthouse keeper (Willem Dafoe). The actors are equally brilliant in this visually striking, claustrophobic, black-and-white horror show. 108 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago-Sun Times

“Like a Boss” () If there’s one word to describe the girl power comedy “Like a Boss,” it’s “incomprehensible.” Structurally, industrially, philosophically, emotionally incomprehensible. What should have been an easy breezy buddy comedy is rather a flabbergasting tone salad. Watching it feels like trying to read a half-completed Mad Libs: Rose Byrne, Tiffany Haddish, cosmetics… Salma Hayek, corporate takeover, Jennifer Coolidge, vagina jokes? You get the gist.. 83 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Little Women” () Writer and director Greta Gerwig take the source material and gives each character depth and growth while still remaining true. With wonderful performances throughout and particularly from Saoirse Ronan, Florence Pugh and Laura Dern, to name a few, these women are not stuck in a 150 year old story, but fully fleshed out humans that we can relate to today. 135 minutes. (PG)

— Makenzie Whittle, The Bulletin

“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” () In a movie filled with sparkling acting, Brad Pitt dominates as the best friend and former stunt double of a fading TV star (Leonardo DiCaprio). Quentin Tarantino’s deeply personal, darkly funny period piece, set in 1969, brilliantly and sometimes outrageously mashes up real-life events and characters with pure fiction. 159 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Parasite” () One of the best movies of 2019, Bong Joon Ho’s story of a rich family and a poor one living parallel and drastically different lives in South Korea is a film of dramatic power, innovative comedy, romantic poetry and melancholy beauty. 132 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Richard Jewell” () Despite some interesting performances from Paul Walter Hauser, Kathy Bates and Sam Rockwell as Jewell’s lawyer, the whole film just makes you wonder what message director Clint Eastwood might be trying to impart, with this film, in 2019, that essentially condemns the act of suspecting and investigating a young white man of domestic terrorism. When journalists are under physical and philosophical threat more than they ever have been, why paint them to be the true scourge, and not the actual terrorist, Eric Rudolph, who went on to claim more victims and who is completely absent from the film? No amount of Eastwood nostalgia can make the questionable message he tries to sell in “Richard Jewell” easier to accept. 129 minutes (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Spies in Disguise” () There’s a warm message of companionship and teamwork at the center of “Spies in Disguise,” but what makes it subversive is its emphasis on gentler methods of conflict resolution, or at least less bloody ones. It’s refreshing to see bubbles, bubblegum and lots of kitty glitter defeat murderous robots. But “Spies in Disguise,” despite a fun chemistry between stars Will Smith and Tom Holland, is a lot like a soap bubble: pretty to watch, entertaining for a bit, but disappears on contact. It’s entertaining but ephemeral. 101 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” () The conclusion to the cultural juggernaut of the past four decades ends with more of a sigh than a bang. With a rudderless trilogy to wrap up, the breakneck speed of a film has nice moments mixed with bad bits of dialogue, underused characters and arcs that feel unearned and rushed. 141 minutes (PG-13)

— Makenzie Whittle, The Bulletin

“Three Christs” (star rating unavailable) “Three Christs” tells the story of an extraordinary experiment that began in 1959 at Michigan’s Ypsilanti State Hospital, where Dr. Alan Stone treated three paranoid schizophrenic patients who each believe they are Jesus Christ. Dr. Stone pioneers a simple, yet revolutionary treatment: instead of submitting the patients to electroshock, forced restraints and tranquilizers, he puts them in a room together to confront their delusions. What transpires is a darkly comic, intensely dramatic story about the nature of identity and the power of empathy. 147 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Uncut Gems” () By now, we shouldn’t be too surprised by this cultural contradiction known as Adam Sandler. It’s obvious that Sandler, the actor, is capable of extraordinary range — not in the traditional, Meryl Streep sense, but a range of incredibly good (“Punch-Drunk Love”) to painfully bad (the horrendous “Jack and Jill”) and incredibly good again, as in “Uncut Gems,” a frenetic, compulsively watchable, exhausting and exhilarating collaboration with Josh and Benny Safdie. 135 minutes. (R)

— Jocelyn Noveck, AP National Writer

“Underwater” () The sickly green aesthetic and harried editing brings a queasy verve to the proceedings, and coupled with the cast, “Underwater” rises above its generic provenance. But as stylish as it is, and with as many deeply treacherous and inventive dilemmas as the group faces, the film is too faithful to the formula that it never achieves pulse-quickening suspense. It devolves into a grim box-checking as our final girl drags herself around the murky environs of the ocean floor. “Underwater” never quite breaches the surface from good to great, though this well-appointed creature feature proves to be an excellent showcase for Kristen Stewart’s screen presence. 95 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Waves”() This beautiful and pensive and heartbreaking drama begins with perfect little moments, all designed to immerse us in the world of a high school wrestler, his sweet little sister and their father and stepmom. But soon we begin to see signs of the tidal wave of trouble ahead. 135 minutes (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago-Sun Times

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