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“Into the Canyon” In 2016, filmmaker/photographer Pete McBride and writer Kevin Fedarko set out on a 750-mile journey on foot through the entire length of the Grand Canyon. More people have stood on the moon than have completed a continuous through-hike of the Canyon and some have lost their lives trying. But their quest was more than just an endurance test — it was also a way to draw attention to the unprecedented threats facing one of our most revered landscapes. This film screens at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Tower Theatre. $15 plus fees, free for BendFilm members. 84 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from BendFilm

“Leave No Trace” Will (Ben Foster) and his teenage daughter, Tom (Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie), have lived off the grid for years in the forests of Portland, Oregon. When their idyllic life is shattered, both are put into social services. After clashing with their new surroundings, Will and Tom set off on a harrowing journey back to their wild homeland. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Friday at Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, Madras. Free. 109 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

Metropolitan Opera: “Wozzeck” Berg’s 20th-century shocker stars baritone Peter Mattei in the title role, with Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin on the podium and soprano Elza van den Heever as the long-suffering Marie. Groundbreaking visual artist and director William Kentridge unveils a bold new staging set in an apocalyptic wasteland. This film livestreams at 9:55 a.m. Saturday with a encore presentations at 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Cinemas Old Mill 16 & IMAX. $24 adults, $22 seniors, $18 children. 120 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“A Month in the Country” Five centuries ago, a mural was created in a country church in the north of England, and then hidden under layers of white paint. Looking at it again will be a distraction, the Reverend Mr. Keach tells World War I veteran Tom Birken (Colin Firth), who will spend a month in the country restoring the mural. Another veteran, James Moon (Kenneth Branagh), is looking for the grave of an ancestor of the patroness of the church who fought in the Crusades. This film screens at 6 p.m. Sunday at Trinity Episcopal Church, St. Helens Hall in Bend. Free. 96 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Overcomer” Life changes overnight for Coach John Harrison when his high school basketball team and state championship dreams are crushed under the weight of unexpected news. After reluctantly agreeing to coach cross-country, John and his wife, Amy, meet an aspiring athlete who’s pushing her limits on a journey toward discovery. This film screens at 12:45 p.m. Tuesday at the Bend Senior Center. Free. 119 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“PINTS: Flagship on the River” Exploring Deschutes Brewery’s bold beginnings in a depressed logging town as founder Gary Fish recounts the brewery’s early days. Featuring interviews with influential brewery figures, long-time Bend residents and leaders in Oregon’s craft beer community, this episode offers both insights into the people and place that built Deschutes, while also shedding light on the changing face of craft brewing as a whole. This film screens at 6 p.m. Friday at Deschutes Brewery Public House, Bend. $5. 20 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Saving the Dark” In partnership with the Sisters Astronomy Club, the screening of the documentary is about the significance of astronomy and the night skies, effects of light pollution on astronomy, human health, wildlife and beyond. The film will be followed by a panel discussion. This film screens at 7 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.) Wednesday at Sisters Movie House. Free. 56 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Sisters Movie House

“Weathering With You” Fan Preview Screening The summer of his high school freshman year, Hodaka runs away from his remote island home to Tokyo, and quickly finds himself pushed to his financial and personal limits. The weather is unusually gloomy and rainy every day, as if to suggest his future. He lives his days in isolation, but finally finds work as a writer for a mysterious occult magazine. Then one day, Hodaka meets Hina on a busy street corner. This bright and strong-willed girl possesses a strange and wonderful ability: the power to stop the rain and clear the sky. This film screens with English dubbing at 7 p.m. and with English subtitles at 8 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Cinemas Old Mill 16 & IMAX. $18. 125 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“1917” () With brilliant, claustrophobically effective directing choices by Sam Mendes and strong, raw performances from young leads Dean-Charles Chapman and George MacKay, this heart-stopping World War I drama is a unique viewing experience you won’t soon shake off. 119 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago-Sun Times

“Just Mercy” () The real story of civil rights attorney Bryan Stevenson and his fight to keep an innocent black man from being executed. It is urgent, searing and powerful, led by a first-rate cast. Though it portrays events more than 25 years ago, it is very much a film of 2019. If there’s one weakness in the film, it’s that it sometimes veers into hagiography. The naturalism of the cinematography and acting sometimes clashes with dialogue that seems overly polished. 137 minutes. (PG-13)

— Mark Kennedy, AP Entertainment Writer

“Like a Boss” (star rating unavailable) Two friends with very different ideals start a beauty company together. One is more practical while the other wants to earn her fortune and live a lavish lifestyle. 83 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Three Christs” (star rating unavailable) “Three Christs” tells the story of an extraordinary experiment that began in 1959 at Michigan’s Ypsilanti State Hospital, where Dr. Alan Stone treated three paranoid schizophrenic patients who each believe they are Jesus Christ. Dr. Stone pioneers a simple, yet revolutionary treatment: instead of submitting the patients to electroshock, forced restraints and tranquilizers, he puts them in a room together to confront their delusions. What transpires is a darkly comic, intensely dramatic story about the nature of identity and the power of empathy. 147 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Underwater” () The sickly green aesthetic and harried editing brings a queasy verve to the proceedings, and coupled with the cast, “Underwater” rises above its generic provenance. But as stylish as it is, and with as many deeply treacherous and inventive dilemmas as the group faces, the film is too faithful to the formula that it never achieves pulse-quickening suspense. It devolves into a grim box-checking as our final girl drags herself around the murky environs of the ocean floor. “Underwater” never quite breaches the surface from good to great, though this well-appointed creature feature proves to be an excellent showcase for Kristen Stewart’s screen presence. 95 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Addams Family” () A computer-animated comedy mires the eccentric kinfolk from Charles Addams cartoons in a breezy and intermittently funny but not particularly original story. The often wince-inducing humor is offset by heavy-handed message-sending about tolerance and acceptance and learning how to live and let live. 105 minutes (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Tribune

“Becoming Nobody” (star rating unavailable) Using a mix of interviews and archival recordings of his presentations, the American spiritual teacher Ram Dass, born Richard Alpert, tells the story of his life, while summarizing his primary teachings. 81 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Bombshell” () “Bombshell” depicts the corporate culture of sexual harassment at Fox News through the perspectives of three women: star anchor Megyn Kelly (a husky-voiced Theron, almost unrecognizable), “Fox & Friends” star Gretchen Carlson (Nicole Kidman) and a fictional composite associate producer named Katya Pospisil (Margot Robbie). This is the story behind the toppling of Roger Ailes (played by John Lithgow, in a fat suit). The question, ultimately, is whether “Bombshell” ought to have spun quite so snappy a movie out of such a story. It does cartwheels to make a vile tale compelling, and it can feel like a parade of starry impressions rather than something genuine. (Best of the bunch is Alanna Ubach’s Jeanine Pirro.) But to quote Ailes in the film, “It’s a visual medium.” 108 minutes. (R)

— Jake Coyle, AP Film Writer

“Cats” () Despite the elaborate production design and the earnest efforts of Jennifer Hudson, Ian McKellen and the rest of the big-name talent — transformed into singing felines with creepy “digital fur technology” — this adaptation of the stage musical is a slick and tedious and weird-looking exercise in self-indulgence. 110 minutes (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago-Sun Times

“Ford v Ferrari” () “Ford v Ferrari,” James Mangold’s meaty, muscular slice of mainstream movie entertainment, wastes no time getting off to the races. Viscerally, it’s nothing less than a straight thrill ride. Bale, predictably, is the heart and soul of “Ford v Ferrari,” rangy and wiry, his twitchy, obsessive performance is deeply humane, a portrayal of a man who may not have been the picture-perfect company spokesman, but one whose unique life experiences gave him his incredible skill. That’s something corporate strategies could never snuff out. 152 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Frankie” () The appeal of “Frankie” is yes, its gorgeous setting, and its stars, but also just how lived-in it feels. It’s a comfortably chic peek into a world of massive privilege that’s also an incredibly cozy space in which to spend some time, despite how uncomfortable its occupants seem. “Frankie” invites the audience along, and the unique experience of time is somewhat intoxicating, the mere invitation to coexist with them. The plot of “Frankie,” like so many of the characters, meanders, aimlessly at times, but like an expensive vacation, it’s utterly lovely to experience and surprising when it’s over. 100 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Frozen II” () “Frozen II” merely drifts pleasantly in and out of our consciousness, a diverting way to spend an hour and 43 minutes with some great tunes and lovely snowy landscapes to ogle. It will of course be seared into the brains of parents and kids after their millionth viewing. And it’s enjoyable and funny enough to be tolerated that many times, which seems to be what it’s designed for. 103 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Grudge” (star rating unavailable) After a young mother murders her family in her own house, a single mother and young detective tries to investigate and solve the case. Later, she discovers the house is cursed by a vengeful ghost that dooms those who enter it with a violent death. Now, she runs to save herself and her son from demonic spirits from the cursed house in her neighborhood. 93 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Honey Boy” () Shia LaBeouf, writer of this film’s sharp and unflinchingly honest screenplay, portrays a fictional version of his own abusive father in a raw and riveting psychodrama based on his beginnings as a child actor. 93 minutes. (R)

Richard Roeper, Chicago-Sun Times

“Joker” () “Joker” is, so monotonously grandiose and full of its own pretensions that it winds up feeling puny and predictable. Like the anti-hero at its center, it’s a movie trying so hard to be capital-b Big that it can’t help looking small. 122 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Jumanji: The Next Level” () The pleasures of “Jumanji: The Next Level” are not visual or story-based, as they revolve around the ability of each of our stars and their abilities to do impressions. And the story offers up a few chances for the characters to avatar swap, showing off the actors’ abilities to embody the different jock/nerd/cheerleader/cantankerous grandpa personas. Once again, this is a one-joke movie, but for the time being, that joke still has some tread on the tires, especially with such charming stars and some light innovation. It remains to be seen how much mileage this franchise can sustain on charm alone, however. 123 minutes (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Knives Out” () At the heart of “Knives Out” is a message about the corrosive, corrupting nature of inherited wealth and what it means to be deserving of the riches a single person accumulates over a lifetime or more. What renders someone more deserving, their bloodline or the way they treat others? What would the world be like if the daughters of immigrants, if women of color held economic power? It’s a cunning, stunning little moral director Rian Johnson tucks away in his star-studded mystery movie, one that makes it that much more interesting and worth watching. That’s not to say the other elements pale in comparison. Nothing could be more visually potent than Chris Evans in a soft sweater, drinking an Old Fashioned in a cozy tavern. Add to that Michael Shannon hurling insults, Toni Collette’s pitch perfect vocal fry, Jamie Lee Curtis sternly smoking cigarettes and Don Johnson casually dropping offensive dad jokes, and it’s an embarrassment of riches. It’s the class warfare picture by way of Agatha Christie that we never knew we needed, but we do, now more than ever. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh,Tribune News Service

“Little Women” () Writer and director Greta Gerwig take the source material and gives each character depth and growth while still remaining true. With wonderful performances throughout and particularly from Saoirse Ronan, Florence Pugh and Laura Dern, to name a few, these women are not stuck in a 150 year old story, but fully fleshed out humans that we can relate to today. 135 minutes. (PG)

— Makenzie Whittle, The Bulletin

“Richard Jewell” () Despite some interesting performances from Paul Walter Hauser, Kathy Bates and Sam Rockwell as Jewell’s lawyer, the whole film just makes you wonder what message director Clint Eastwood might be trying to impart, with this film, in 2019, that essentially condemns the act of suspecting and investigating a young white man of domestic terrorism. When journalists are under physical and philosophical threat more than they ever have been, why paint them to be the true scourge, and not the actual terrorist, Eric Rudolph, who went on to claim more victims and who is completely absent from the film? No amount of Eastwood nostalgia can make the questionable message he tries to sell in “Richard Jewell” easier to accept. 129 minutes (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Spies in Disguise” (2.5 stars) There’s a warm message of companionship and teamwork at the center of “Spies in Disguise,” but what makes it subversive is its emphasis on gentler methods of conflict resolution, or at least less bloody ones. It’s refreshing to see bubbles, bubblegum and lots of kitty glitter defeat murderous robots. But “Spies in Disguise,” despite a fun chemistry between stars Will Smith and Tom Holland, is a lot like a soap bubble: pretty to watch, entertaining for a bit, but disappears on contact. It’s entertaining but ephemeral. 101 minutes. (PG)

Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” (2.5 stars) The conclusion to the cultural juggernaut of the past four decades ends with more of a sigh than a bang. With a rudderless trilogy to wrap up, the breakneck speed of a film has nice moments mixed with bad bits of dialogue, underused characters and arcs that feel unearned and rushed. 141 minutes (PG-13)

— Makenzie Whittle, The Bulletin

“Uncut Gems” () By now, we shouldn’t be too surprised by this cultural contradiction known as Adam Sandler. It’s obvious that Sandler, the actor, is capable of extraordinary range — not in the traditional, Meryl Streep sense, but a range of incredibly good (“Punch-Drunk Love”) to painfully bad (the horrendous “Jack and Jill”) and incredibly good again, as in “Uncut Gems,” a frenetic, compulsively watchable, exhausting and exhilarating collaboration with Josh and Benny Safdie. 135 minutes. (R)

— Jocelyn Noveck, AP National Writer

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