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Bend Fly Fishing Film Tour — Featuring exclusive shorts from fishing guide fairytales to canyon conservation in Colorado, mountain biking for marlin, jumping jaguars and jungle fish in whitewater rapids and the audacious Aussies who explore the largest coastline in the world. From saltwater to fresh, this year’s film is geared to get you stoked for another incredible season on the water. This festival screens at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday at the Tower Theatre in Bend. $18 plus fees. Run time unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from towertheatre.org

“The Farewell” — A headstrong Chinese-American woman returns to China when her beloved grandmother is diagnosed with terminal cancer. Billi struggles with her family’s decision to keep grandma in the dark about her own illness as they all stage an impromptu wedding to see grandma one last time. This film screens at 12:45 p.m. Tuesday at the Bend Senior Center. Free. 100 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

From the Vault: An Evening of Night Light Show Films Past and Present — Unlocked Films founder Jesse Locke joins Night Light Show host Shanan Kelley for an inside look at the evolution of their special brand of NLS comedy shorts. This evening’s program is rounded out by community cameos, behind the scenes anecdotes and commentary and other surprises! These films screen at 7:30 p.m. on Monday at Tin Pan Theater in Bend. $12-$20 sliding scale plus fees. Run time unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from bendticket.com

“Kifaru” — With the northern white rhino species on the brink of extinction, two ranger recruits are mentored by a seasoned ranger with an unorthodox approach to caring for the last northern white rhino male — “Sudan.” Spanning over the course of the recruits’ first four years on the job, Kifaru allows viewers to experience the joys and pitfalls of conservation firsthand through the lens of the men that look into the eyes of extinction on a daily basis. This film screens at 5:30 p.m. Monday at McMenamins Old St. Francis Theater in Bend. $12 plus fees. 81 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from BendFilm

The Metropolitan Opera “The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess” — The Gershwins’ modern American masterpiece has its first Met performances in almost three decades, starring bass-baritone Eric Owens and soprano Angel Blue in the title roles. Director James Robinson’s stylish production transports audiences to Catfish Row, a setting vibrant with the music, dancing, emotion and heartbreak of its inhabitants. This film screens at 12:55 p.m. Saturday at Regal Cinemas Old Mill 16 & IMAX. $24 adult, $22 senior, $18 child. 220 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

National Theatre Live: “One Man Two Guvnors” — Featuring a Tony Award-winning performance from James Corden, the hilarious West End and Broadway hit returns to cinemas. Fired from his skiffle band, Francis Henshall becomes minder to Roscoe Crabbe, a small time East End hood. But Roscoe is really his sister Rachel posing as her own dead brother, who’s been killed by her boyfriend Stanley Stubbers. Holed up at The Cricketers’ Arms, the permanently ravenous Francis spots the chance of an extra meal ticket and takes a second job with one Stanley Stubbers, who is hiding from the police and waiting to be reunited with Rachel. To prevent discovery, Francis must keep his two guvnors apart. Simple. This film screens at 6 p.m. on Tuesday at Sisters Movie House. $15. 200 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Sisters Movie House

“The Red Sea Miracle: Part I” — It’s one of the greatest miracles in the Bible: Moses and the Israelites trapped at the sea by Pharaoh’s army when God miraculously parts the waters, rescuing the Israelites and destroying Pharaoh and his chariots. But is there any evidence that it really happened and if so, where? That’s what investigative filmmaker Timothy Mahoney set out to discover 18 years ago and now he is ready to share what’s been uncovered; a controversy between two dramatically different approaches in reading the biblical text. One approach is Egyptian, the other is Hebrew. This film screens at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Regal Cinemas Old Mill 16 & IMAX. $14. 150 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Ride Your Wave” — Hinako is a surf-loving college student who has just moved to a small seaside town. When a sudden fire breaks out at her apartment building, she is rescued by Minato, a handsome firefighter, and the two soon fall in love. Just as they become inseparable, Minato loses his life in an accident at sea. Hinako is so distraught that she can no longer even look at the ocean, but one day she sings a song that reminds her of their time together, and Minato appears in the water. From then on, she can summon him in any watery surface as she sings their song, but can the two really remain together forever? This film screens with English subtitles at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Cinemas Old Mill 16 & IMAX. $14. 105 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“The Upside” — Philip is a disabled white billionaire who feels that life is not worth living. To help him in his day to day routine, he hires Del, an African American parolee trying to reconnect with his estranged wife. What begins as a professional relationship develops into a friendship as Del shows his grouchy charge that life is worth living. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex in Madras. Free. 126 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Downhill” () In this pale, tame, broad and soft-edged remake of the far superior Swedish film “Force Majeure,” a dad (Will Ferrell) on a ski vacation ditches his family in a moment when an avalanche seems imminent, to the disgust of his wife (Julia Louis-Dreyfus). 86 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago-Sun Times

“Fantasy Island” (star rating unavailable) The enigmatic Mr. Roarke, makes the secret dreams of his lucky guests come true at a luxurious but remote tropical resort. But when the fantasies turn into nightmares, the guests have to solve the island’s mystery in order to escape with their lives. 110 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“The Photograph” (star rating unavailable) When famed photographer Christina Eames unexpectedly dies, she leaves her estranged daughter Mae Morton (Issa Rae) hurt, angry and full of questions. When a photograph tucked away in a safe-deposit box is found, Mae finds herself on a journey delving into her mother’s early life and ignites a powerful, unexpected romance with a rising-star journalist, Michael Block (LaKeith Stanfield). 106 minutes (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Sonic the Hedgehog” (star rating unavailable) Based on the global blockbuster videogame franchise from Sega, “Sonic the Hedgehog” tells the story of the world’s speediest hedgehog as he embraces his new home on Earth. In this live-action adventure comedy, Sonic and his new best friend Tom (James Marsden) team up to defend the planet from the evil genius Dr. Robotnik (Jim Carrey) and his plans for world domination. The family-friendly film also stars Tika Sumpter and Ben Schwartz as the voice of Sonic. 99 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“1917” () A visceral look at WWI from the everyday men who fought through it. This expertly shot film takes the audience on a real time ride through the trenches, No-Man’s Land and beyond in an epicly scaled journey to save thousands of soldiers. 119 minutes. (R)

— Makenzie Whittle, The Bulletin

2020 Oscar Nominated Shorts: Animation (star rating unavailable) A collection of the nominated films including “Hair Love,” “Dcera (Daughter),” “Sister,” “Memorable” and “Kitbull” plus a selection of additional animated shorts including “Henrietta Bulkowski,” “The Bird and the Whale,” “Hors Piste” and “Maestro.” 85 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from BendFilm

2020 Oscar Nominated Shorts: Documentary (star rating unavailable) A collection of the nominated films including “A Sister,” “Brotherhood,” “Saria” and “Nefta Football Club.” 104 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from BendFilm

2020 Oscar Nominated Shorts: Live Action (star rating unavailable) A collection of the nominated films including “Life Overtakes Me,” “Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone (if You’re a Girl),” “In the Absence,” “Walk Run Cha-Cha” and “St. Louis Superman.” 160 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from BendFilm

“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” () Balancing pathos, humor and Rogers’ practice of radical Christian love and acceptance, director Heller lends “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” a light touch and depth of feeling that play off each other in near-perfect balance. The film’s finest scene is the work of a filmmaker of superb judgment and confidence, who knows exactly what her movie is about: not a cuddly figure from baby boomers’ collective past or the “emotional arc” of a flawed protagonist, but those moments of grace — vagrant, unearned, numinous and liberating — that can turn everyday life into a miracle. 108 minutes. (PG)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Bad Boys for Life” () After turning in the first two greatly beloved, operatically souped-up action opuses in the “Bad Boys” franchise, everyone’s favorite gearhead maximalist auteur Michael Bay is no longer behind the camera for the third, “Bad Boys for Life.” Not to worry though, as Belgian filmmaking duo Adil El Arbi and Bilall Fallah, clearly devoted students of Bay’s style, craft a wonderful facsimile of his greatest hits, from his swirling low-angle dolly shots to capturing the glorious clash of sunset and neon that screams Miami, and it’s a hoot for fans of the franchise. 123 minutes (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Dolittle” () Between Robert Downey Jr.’s muddled accent, paper thin characters, bad CGI and little plot, “Dolittle” is doomed to the same fate of its 1967 predecessor. 101 minutes (PG)

— Makenzie Whittle, The Bulletin

“Frozen II” () “Frozen II” merely drifts pleasantly in and out of our consciousness, a diverting way to spend an hour and 43 minutes with some great tunes and lovely snowy landscapes to ogle. It will of course be seared into the brains of parents and kids after their millionth viewing. And it’s enjoyable and funny enough to be tolerated that many times, which seems to be what it’s designed for. 103 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Gentlemen” () Underneath the chic costumes, quippy dialogue and rich sets, Richie’s return to form is pretty onenote, oozing with toxic masculinity and casual racism. 113 minutes. (R)

— Makenzie Whittle, The Bulletin

“Gretel & Hansel” — (star review unavailable) A long time ago in a distant fairy tale countryside, a young girl leads her little brother into a dark wood in desperate search of food and work, only to stumble upon a nexus of terrifying evil. 87 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey” () Margot Robbie shines as the slightly deranged, typical anti-heroine, who decides to make some better choice after breaking up with the Joker. No need to have seen 2016’s “Suicide Squad” to understand what’s happening; Harley stands on her own in this fun romp through Gotham. 109 minutes (R)

— Makenzie Whittle, The Bulletin

“A Hidden Life” () In 1940s Austria, a farmer is jailed for refusing to sign a loyalty oath to Hitler, as his wife and children suffer without him. This is a Terrence Malick film, so you can count on feeling dazzled by spectacular shots of heaven on Earth, and impatient at the sheer overpowering deliberateness of it all. 180 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago-Sun Times

“Jojo Rabbit” () Writer-director Taika Waititi delivers a timely, anti-hate fractured fairy tale AND turns in hilarious work as Adolf Hitler, imaginary friend to a 10-year-old German boy near the end of World War II. No, really. 108 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago-Sun Times

“Joker” () “Joker” is, so monotonously grandiose and full of its own pretensions that it winds up feeling puny and predictable. Like the anti-hero at its center, it’s a movie trying so hard to be capital-b Big that it can’t help looking small. 122 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Jumanji: The Next Level” () The pleasures of “Jumanji: The Next Level” are not visual or story-based, as they revolve around the ability of each of our stars and their abilities to do impressions. And the story offers up a few chances for the characters to avatar swap, showing off the actors’ abilities to embody the different jock/nerd/cheerleader/cantankerous grandpa personas. Once again, this is a one-joke movie, but for the time being, that joke still has some tread on the tires, especially with such charming stars and some light innovation. It remains to be seen how much mileage this franchise can sustain on charm alone, however. 123 minutes (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Just Mercy” () The real story of civil rights attorney Bryan Stevenson and his fight to keep an innocent black man from being executed. It is urgent, searing and powerful, led by a first-rate cast. Though it portrays events more than 25 years ago, it is very much a film of 2019. If there’s one weakness in the film, it’s that it sometimes veers into hagiography. The naturalism of the cinematography and acting sometimes clashes with dialogue that seems overly polished. 137 minutes. (PG-13)

— Mark Kennedy, AP Entertainment Writer

“Knives Out” () At the heart of “Knives Out” is a message about the corrosive, corrupting nature of inherited wealth and what it means to be deserving of the riches a single person accumulates over a lifetime or more. What renders someone more deserving, their bloodline or the way they treat others? What would the world be like if the daughters of immigrants, if women of color held economic power? It’s a cunning, stunning little moral director Rian Johnson tucks away in his star-studded mystery movie, one that makes it that much more interesting and worth watching. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Last Full Measure” () What one walks away with from “The Last Full Measure” isn’t necessarily the heroism of Pitsenbarger, though his personal sacrifice was immense. What the film reveals is the deep shame and trauma vets contend with, as survivors who made it out alive, as men who are fallible and flawed who did their best under extreme violence and duress and have to live with those choices for the rest of their lives. What “The Last Full Measure” demonstrates is how powerful it can be to shed light on these experiences, through testimony, bearing witness and yes, ceremonial recognition. 110 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Little Women” () Writer and director Greta Gerwig take the source material and gives each character depth and growth while still remaining true. With wonderful performances throughout and particularly from Saoirse Ronan, Florence Pugh and Laura Dern, to name a few, these women are not stuck in a 150-year-old story, but fully fleshed out humans that we can relate to today. 135 minutes. (PG)

— Makenzie Whittle, The Bulletin

“Midnight Family” (star rating unavailable) In Mexico City’s wealthiest neighborhoods, the Ochoa family runs a for-profit ambulance, competing with other unlicensed EMTs for patients in need of urgent care. In this cutthroat industry, they struggle to keep their financial needs from compromising the people in their care. 81 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from imdb.com

“Parasite” () One of the best movies of 2019, Bong Joon Ho’s story of a rich family and a poor one living parallel and drastically different lives in South Korea is a film of dramatic power, innovative comedy, romantic poetry and melancholy beauty. 132 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Spies in Disguise” () There’s a warm message of companionship and teamwork at the center of “Spies in Disguise,” but what makes it subversive is its emphasis on gentler methods of conflict resolution, or at least less bloody ones. It’s refreshing to see bubbles, bubblegum and lots of kitty glitter defeat murderous robots. But “Spies in Disguise,” despite a fun chemistry between stars Will Smith and Tom Holland, is a lot like a soap bubble: pretty to watch, entertaining for a bit, but disappears on contact. It’s entertaining but ephemeral. 101 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” () The conclusion to the cultural juggernaut of the past four decades ends with more of a sigh than a bang. With a rudderless trilogy to wrap up, the breakneck speed of the film has nice moments mixed with bad bits of dialogue, underused characters and arcs that feel unearned and rushed. 141 minutes (PG-13)

— Makenzie Whittle, The Bulletin

“The Turning” () “The Turning” builds to a deeply disturbing crescendo, then pulls the rug right out from under the audience in a way that seemingly undercuts what came before, an uncovering of dark, violent secrets that offer a new spin on “The Turn of the Screw.” The enigmatic ending doubles down on the ambiguity with which the film has already toyed. It’s less about answers and more about evoking a richly rendered gothic horror vibe while intuition bitterly battles reason. It may not work for everyone, but those for whom it works will find much to savor and puzzle over in “The Turning.” 94 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Uncut Gems” () By now, we shouldn’t be too surprised by this cultural contradiction known as Adam Sandler. It’s obvious that Sandler, the actor, is capable of extraordinary range — not in the traditional, Meryl Streep sense, but a range of incredibly good (“Punch-Drunk Love”) to painfully bad (the horrendous “Jack and Jill”) and incredibly good again, as in “Uncut Gems,” a frenetic, compulsively watchable, exhausting and exhilarating collaboration with Josh and Benny Safdie. 135 minutes. (R)

— Jocelyn Noveck, AP National Writer

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