Bend is a ‘perfect storm’ for melanoma

Wearing sunscreen today? If the answer is no, maybe you should be. Recent data show … Read more

Gun owners and mental health professionals aligning on suicide prevention

A rare alliance between gun enthusiasts and mental health experts has resulted in a culturally sensitive way to talk about suicide

Suicides rates are rising, and the role of guns is stark, unavoidable and contentious. So … Read more

Eating poultry instead of red meat could lower your breast cancer risk

Good news for women who can’t quite bring themselves to go vegetarian but don’t mind … Read more

Pregnancy and pot: Study seeks answer, draws critics

CHICAGO — Pregnancy started out rough for Leslie Siu. Morning sickness and migraines had her … Read more

Pot users: Tell your doc before surgery

DENVER — When Colorado legalized marijuana, it became a pioneer in creating new policies to … Read more

Program’s goal is to prevent nurse suicides

SAN DIEGO — Nurses commit suicide at a significantly higher rate than the general population, … Read more

Pfizer will merge off-patent drug unit with EpiPen maker Mylan in restructuring

Deal to up profit on generic drugs

Pfizer agreed Monday to combine its off-patent drugs division, which controls treatments like the statin … Read more

E-cigarettes spawn worrisome addictions

When her son was a high school freshman, Kristin Beauparlant noticed a change. The hockey … Read more

Brain scans of U.S. diplomats stationed in Cuba add to mystery

Advanced brain scans found perplexing differences in U.S. diplomats who say they developed concussionlike symptoms … Read more

Even one small glass of juice or soda a day can increase cancer risk, study says

Scientists have warned against drinking too much soda or juice. Now, they believe even one … Read more

Papaya outbreak highlights FDA’s food safety challenge

WASHINGTON — Salmonella infections caused by contaminated papayas highlight the challenges federal officials face in … Read more

Scientists are closing in on blood test for Alzheimer’s

LOS ANGELES — Scientists are closing in on a long-sought goal — a blood test … Read more

A peek into opioid users’ brains as they try to quit

BETHESDA, Md. — Lying inside a scanner, the patient watched as pictures appeared one by … Read more

New Oregon CCO contracts focus on behavioral health

Oregon has picked the winners in the $6 billion-a-year coordinated care sweepstakes. In the biggest … Read more

Is cold brew better than iced coffee?

Around this time in July — when our ever-shortening spring weather takes a sharp right … Read more

Penn finds a way to reduce ICU doctor burnout

Cutting the length of rotations in medical intensive care units in half also cut rates … Read more

Suicide rates have increased 33% since 1999

The suicide rate in the United States increased 33% between 1999 and 2017, the Centers … Read more

Dikembe Mutombo is a big help in getting the Ebola message out

NEW YORK — Unable to send disease fighters to help battle one of the deadliest … Read more

How to make sustainable lifestyle changes

Just days into the new year, legs pumped furiously and arms swung back and forth … Read more

Wildfire smoke to spread across U.S.

Health problems expected to increase, scientists say

BILLINGS, Mont. — Climate change in the Western U.S. means more intense and frequent wildfires … Read more

Health paradox: New U.S. diabetes cases fall as obesity rises

NEW YORK — The number of new diabetes cases among U.S. adults keeps falling, even … Read more

Regulators approve the most expensive drug ever

Treatment with Zolgensma, which is for a rare disorder in babies, will cost $2.125 million

U.S. regulators have approved the most expensive medicine ever, for a rare disorder that destroys … Read more

Scientists spy on superbugs to see how they outsmart our antibiotics

Scientists have discovered another way that single-celled organisms have outsmarted us. The tiny bacteria that … Read more

There are effective HIV treatments. Why are people still dying of AIDS?

More than two decades after an effective treatment for HIV emerged, most patients live more or less normal lives. Yet barriers to treatment remain for some populations, and many still die.

Seventeen years after being infected with HIV, Ronald Jesser was dying. His immune system ravaged … Read more

Have you heard the one about the dental assistant?

Jessica Taylor has two passions. Neither of them were planned. She’s a dental assistant, a … Read more

Paging Dr. Dog…

St. Charles uses therapy dogs to help staff get through stressful situations

When the St. Charles Health System went live with a stressful switch to a new … Read more

Taking the lead in Oregon to prevent inherited disease

To avoid backlash from irresponsible applications, gene therapies should be developed in the U.S.

Clinicians at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland see some of the toughest cases … Read more

Hope Theory can help break big problems into smaller, attainable ones

Ugh. I knew the minute I looked out the back door that I wasn’t doing … Read more

Doctors are prescribing broccoli alongside the beta blockers

WASHINGTON — Adrienne Dove pulled up to the checkout line of the Giant grocery store … Read more

Study: Highly processed foods lead to weight gain

For four weeks, 20 healthy volunteers checked into a research center hospital and were served … Read more

New liver transplant rules begin amid a fight over fairness

WASHINGTON — Wilnelia Cruz-Ulloa spent the last months of her life in a New York … Read more

2019 measles cases top 800, the most since 1994

U.S. health officials say this year’s count of measles cases has surpassed 800, a growing … Read more

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