Heads Up

“24 Solo” — Filmmaker Jason Berry tracks a grueling year in the life of competitive mountain-bike racer Chris Eatough in this 2007 documentary. Benefits the Central Oregon Trail Alliance. This film screens at 8 p.m. (doors open at 7:15 p.m.) Thursday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. Cost is $6 (cash only). 75 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Apollo 11” — Commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing with this 2019 documentary about the Apollo 11 mission led by commander Neil Armstrong and pilots Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins. This film screens at 6 p.m. Saturday at Madras Cinemas. Cost is $9. 93 minutes. (G)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie” — A special discounted screening of 2017 animated film about two overly imaginative pranksters named George and Harold who hypnotize their principal into thinking he’s a dimwitted superhero named Captain Underpants. This film screens at 10 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $1. 95 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“First Man” and “Trip to the Moon” — Commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing. “First Man” is a 2018 biographical film about Neil Armstrong directed by Damien Chazelle and executive produced by Steve Spielberg and starring Ryan Gosling and Claire Foy. 141 minutes. (PG-13) “A Trip to the Moon” is a 1902 French silent film directed by Georges Méliès and inspired by the novels of Jules Verne. It will be accompanied by original keyboard accompaniment by Christopher Kuter commissioned by the Tower Foundation. 18 minutes. (No MPAA rating) These films screen at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Tower Theatre in Bend. Cost is $10 to $15 plus fees.

— Synopsis from the Tower Theatre

“Glory” 30th Anniversary — The 1989 film dramatizing the story of the first black regiment to fight for the North in the Civil War. Stars Matthew Broderick, Denzel Washington, Cary Elwes and Morgan Freeman. This film screens at 1 and 4 p.m. Sunday and 4 and 7 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 130 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Is it Wrong to Try to Pick Up Girls in a Dungeon? Arrow of the Orion” — In this anime adventure, the goddess Artemis has sworn to destroy a new threat to Oraria with the help of her chosen warrior. But instead of choosing a legendary hero, Atemis’ quest falls on the shoulders of Bell Cranell. Includes interviews with the production staff and other bonus footage. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in Japanese with English subtitles at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 95 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Knock Down the House” — A 2019 documentary by director Racheal Lears about the political campaigns of four women running for congress during the 2018 U.S. congressional election. Presented by the Democratic Socialists of America — Central Oregon. This film screens at 7 p.m. Saturday at No Expectations Art Collective in Bend. Free. 86 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“The Lego Movie” — A special discounted screening of 2014 animated film about an ordinary Lego construction worker recruited to join a quest to stop an evil tyrant from gluing the Lego universe into eternal stasis. This film screens at 10 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $1. 100 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“The Lion King” Relaxed Screening — To accommodate viewers with sensory processing differences, the new Disney film will be screened with increased room lighting, lower volume and no previews. Families may bring their own gluten-free and casein-free snacks and audience members are welcome to dance, walk, shout or sing along. Presented by the Central Oregon Disability Support Network. This film screens at 9:30 a.m. Saturday (doors open at 9 a.m.) at Redmond Cinemas. Cost is $7 for children 12 and under and $8 for ages 13 and up. 118 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from Central Oregon Disability Support Network

Movies in the Park: “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part” — In this 2019 animated comedy sequel Lego Duplo invaders from outer space are wrecking everything faster than the Lego citizens can rebuild. Family activities including food, games and more will commence at 6 p.m. followed by the film screening at dusk (approximately 8:30 p.m.) at Stryker Park in Prineville. Free. 114 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“This Changes Everything” — In this documentary, some of Hollywood’s leading voices including Geena Davis, Meryl Streep, Rashida Jones, Reese Witherspoon, Sandra Oh, Jessica Chastain, Tiffany Haddish, Natalie Portman and more, look into the history and forces that foster gender discrimination and reinforce disparity in our culture. It also seeks pathways and solutions from within and outside the film industry and around the world. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Monday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 110 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“WALL-E” — In the distant future, a small waste-collecting robot inadvertently embarks on a space journey that will ultimately decide the fate of mankind. Presented by Deschutes Public Library’s A Universe of Stories summer reading program. This film screens at 11 a.m. Tuesday at the Tower Theatre in Bend. Free. 98 minutes. (G)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago” — This 2013 documentary profiles six pilgrims taking the 500 mile Camino De Santiago pilgrimage. This film screens outdoors at 8 p.m. Friday at LOGE Entrada in Bend. Free. 84 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

WHAT’S NEW

“The Art of Self-Defense” () A beta male gets in touch with his alpha by way of a strip mall karate school. It’s a curious and intoxicating new experience for timid accountant Casey (Jesse Eisenberg), who finds his sensei (Alessandro Nivola) after a near-fatal mugging. Writer/director Riley Stearns grapples with notions of gender, violence and identity. But in this mannered, ironic take, his punches don’t land hard enough to leave a mark. 104 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Lion King” () Jon Favreau’s live-action/CGI remake of the Disney animated classic “The Lion King” is a solid and at times stunningly beautiful film with breathtaking attention to detail. The insanely talented duo of Donald Glover and Beyonce are great as Simba and Nala, Billy Eichner and Seth Rogen kill as Timon and Pumbaa, and the CGI version of Scar (Chiwetel Ejiofor) is a work of art. This “Lion King” rules. And roars. This film also screens in 3D, IMAX and IMAX 3D. 118 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Wild Rose” () This Scottish love letter to American country music, is about Glaswegian spitfire Rose-Lynn Harlan (Jessie Buckley), who loves good-old American country music. But although she walks the walk, talks the talk and belts the tunes with an astonishing sense of soul and clarity, it’s the truth part that trips Jessie up. This stunningly beautiful tale is about her journey to discover that truth. 101 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

STILL SHOWING

“Aladdin” () Disney nails it with the live-action update co-written and directed by Guy Ritchie. Canadian actor Mena Massoud is perfect in the role of Aladdin, Naomi Scott as Jasmine, tears into a beefed-up role with gusto and Will Smith adds some hip-hop flair to the Genie. 128 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“American Woman” () Sienna Miller delivers a subtly evolving portrait of Deb, a woman and mother who finds herself, over the course of several years. It is a movingly rendered story, made watchable by an actress whose elastic performance bookends the film with two very different people. 111 minutes. (R)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“Annabelle Comes Home” () In the seventh “Conjuring” installment and the third in the stand-alone trilogy about a malevolent doll, demonologists Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga), relocate the doll Annabelle to their “artifact room,” but their babysitter’s friend accidentally unleashes it. 106 minutes. (R)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“Avengers: Endgame” () Amid all the soaring and the blasting, this superhero adventure for the ages is a genuinely moving drama involving characters we’ve come to know and love. It’s a serious contender to be the best of the Marvel series and the undisputed champion when it comes to emotional punch. 182 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“The Biggest Little Farm” () This documentary chronicles the exploits of Molly and John Chester, a Los Angeles-based chef and cinematographer, respectively, who decided to buy 200 acres of barren land and establish a modern-day Eden of organic, sustainable food production. 91 minutes. (PG)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Crawl” (star rating unavailable) In the middle of an evacuation at the onset of a hurricane, Haley (Kaya Scodelario) finds her father Dave (Barry Pepper) trapped in their family home. The two must try to navigate rising floodwater as they are circled by a pair of humongous alligators. Although Scodelario is spunky and game in what must have been an extremely uncomfortable shoot, the script is airless and repetitive. 87 minutes. (R)

— Jeannette Catsoulis, New York Times

“Dark Phoenix” () In this middling chapter of the “X-Men” series, the telekinetic Jean Grey (Sophie Turner) absorbs a mass of energy that makes her far stronger than ever before, but unable to control the force inside her. The movie doesn’t come close to carrying the emotional impact of so many Marvel Universe films. 115 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Echo in the Canyon” () Jakob Dylan is your tour guide in this sunny, sepia-toned documentary, a love letter to the Laurel Canyon music scene of the mid-1960s and its folk/rock stars, including the Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, the Mamas and the Papas and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. 82 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum” () The third installment of the ultraviolent, wonderfully askew “John Wick” franchise is the most outlandish and maybe the most entertaining chapter to date. Keanu Reeves returns, giving a classic deadpan performance in an escapist movie that encourages us to groan and cringe and laugh at the mayhem. 131 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“The Last Black Man in San Francisco” () Beautiful and melancholy and almost musical in its language, this film centers on Jimmie (Jimmie Fails), a San Francisco man obsessed with reclaiming the house built by his grandfather, and his friend Montgomery (Jonathan Majors), an aspiring playwright. Theirs is one of the most authentic and touching and powerful relationships of any kind in any film this year. 121 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Men in Black: International” () In what could otherwise be just another bland action comedy sprinkled with sci-fi, “Men In Black: International” has a few secret weapons. Despite nagging questions about whether we really needed a new installment of this franchise, “International” makes its case with winning stars, a breakneck pace and a tone that never takes itself too seriously. 114 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Midsommar” () Set in the land of the midnight sun at a Swedish festival celebrating the summer solstice, the setting primes us to expect the unexpected. But one thing’s for certain when it comes to writer/director Ari Aster: Always expect to be disturbed, defiled and maybe even delighted. You’ll never look at flower crowns the same way. 140 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Pokémon Detective Pikachu” () Boasting “Blade Runner”-style visuals and a wise-cracking Ryan Reynolds, “Detective Pikachu” is not for everyone, but it just might be for you. Smart-alecky little Pikachu (Reynolds) in a tiny Sherlock Holmes hat helps Tim (Justice Smith), learn more about his police detective dad. But the story suffers and the action sequences are chaotic. 104 minutes (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Rocketman” () A therapy session serves as a framing device for Elton John’s (Taron Egerton) life story that we revisit throughout the film. The film frequently explodes into song-and-dance fantasy, expressing the emotional twists, turns and turmoil of each moment in John’s remarkable life. 121 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Secret Life of Pets 2” () In this sequel to the 2016 animated hit, sweet pup Max (voiced by Patton Oswalt), is developing a nervous, overprotective itch about his owner’s toddler son. Meanwhile, Max’s pals in the city tangle with some gnarly cats, while bunny Snowball (Kevin Hart) and newcomer Daisy (Tiffany Haddish) rescue a tiger cub. 86 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Spider-Man: Far From Home” () Tom Holland, the best movie Spider-Man of the bunch, stars in this refreshing, down-to-earth chapter in the Avengers saga. It’s a zesty, not overly dark slice of entertainment, bursting with pyrotechnics, sharp humor and just enough life-and-death ingredients to keep you interested throughout. This film also screens in IMAX. 135 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Stuber” () In a plot that plays like the sophomoric-stunt version of Michael Mann’s classic L.A. noir “Collateral,” mild-mannered Uber driver Stu (Kumail Nanjiani) and Los Angeles police detective Vic (Dave Bautista) wind up on a dreary crook’s tour through the city, punctuated by moments of sharing, caring, slapstick comedy and sadistic gunplay. 93 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Toy Story 4” () Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) and friends return in this worthy addition to the “Toy Story” library, bringing back some of the most beloved characters in the history of animated film and introducing us to a fantastically entertaining new bunch of toys. 100 minutes. (G)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Yesterday” () In this high-concept magical dramedy, a weird solar flare wipes our collective consciousness of all traces of The Beatles. Struggling musician Jack (Himesh Patel) is the only person who remembers the band and he ultimately decides to capitalize on it. Even if this modern fairy tale doesn’t hold up on close inspection, the ride is enjoyable. 116 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

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