Heads Up

“42nd Street: The Musical” — One of Broadway’s most classic and beloved tales comes to the big screen. Filmed at London’s Theatre Royal and directed by original author Mark Bramble, it tells the story of Peggy Sawyer, a talented young performer with stars in her eyes who gets her big break on Broadway. This film screens at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $18 plus fees. 155 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

BANFF Mountain Film Festival — See a selection of exhilarating short films showcasing climbing, biking, snow sports, paddling and more from the 2019 BANFF Mountain Film Festival. A different program screens each night. Benefits Realms middle and high schools. These films screen at 7 p.m. Saturday and 6 p.m. Sunday at the Tower Theatre in Bend. Cost is $40 for both nights, $22 per night in advance or $25 day of show, plus fees. Running time unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from the Tower Theatre

“Kingdom Men Rising” — A documentary exploring what it means to be a real man in the midst of cultural trends and confusion about masculinity. This film draws from the experiences of author, pastor and speaker Dr. Tony Evans addressing important issues from a biblical perspective. This film screens at 7 p.m. Monday and Tuesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 plus fees. 90 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

WHAT’S NEW

“Avengers: Endgame” () Amid all the soaring and the blasting, this superhero adventure for the ages is a genuinely moving drama involving characters we’ve come to know and love. It’s a serious contender to be the best of the Marvel series and the undisputed champion when it comes to emotional punch. This film also screens in 3D, IMAX and IMAX 3D. 182 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Diane” () Mary Kay Place plays the title character, a small-town rebel who has paid for her younger risks and rewards, but not yet in full. Diane lives alone but fills her days with volunteer work. Her son has been through rehab for drug addiction and now, he appears to be using again. The film asks if an ordinary, flawed person’s good works make up for a selfish, long-lingering mistake? Place is wonderful. But everyone else is, too. 95 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“High Life” () In Claire Denis’ singular, meticulous, confounding film, Monte (Robert Pattinson), is a death row inmate sent into deep space with a handful of other criminals as part of an eight-year suicide mission to a black hole that may hold the key to Earth’s survival. Juliette Binoche is Dr. Dibs, whose mission, besides the black hole, is to impregnate one of the women on board. Transfixing? A bore? I cannot answer for you. Undeniably, though, “High Life” is an organic achievement. 113 minutes. (R)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“Little Woods” (star rating unavailable) Ollie (Tessa Thompson), short for Oleander, is a daughter in mourning for a mother who recently died after a brutal illness. Ollie still sleeps on the floor of her mother’s room, clinging to a past — and a caretaker identity — that threatens to become a prison as she strives to set her life right. Thompson emotionally expands “Little Woods,” turning a small movie into something more than its textured parts. 105 minutes. (R)

— Manohla Dargis, New York Times

“Peterloo” () This film about an 1819 massacre of British working people peacefully demonstrating for their political rights, marks an exceedingly rare instance when revered writer-director Mike Leigh’s powers of observation and propulsive storytelling fail him. Rather than a fine-tuned excavation, “Peterloo” unfurls like a grandiose pageant, in which Leigh’s usual gifts for illuminating human behavior at its most intimate and universal are sacrificed to expository set pieces and long, windy speeches. The end result is a movie that feels oddly detached. 154 minutes. (PG-13)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

STILL SHOWING

“After” (star rating unavailable) Based on Anna Todd’s best-selling novel, “After” follows dutiful student, daughter and girlfriend Tessa (Josephine Langford), as she enters college. Her world opens up when she meets the dark and mysterious Hardin Scott (Hero Fiennes Tiffin), who makes her question all she thought she knew about herself and what she wants out of life. 120 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Alita: Battle Angel” () Rescued cyborg Alita (Rosa Salazar) experiences everything in post-apocalyptic Iron City with a childlike wonder. She also possesses unique fighting skills, which she puts to use defending her loved ones. Director, Robert Rodriguez brings a go-for-broke sense of world-building, but the film is failed by the weak script, tonal inconsistencies and poorly written characters. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Apollo 11" () This documentary about the people who pulled off the spectacular feat of sending Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins to the moon in 1969 doesn't profess to offer new information or insights. What it does offer is a wealth of fresh images and sound, assembled into an immersive journey. 93 minutes. (G)

— Mark Jenkins, The Washington Post

"Arctic" () In this gripping, wintry film, Overgård (Mads Mikkelsen), has survived a plane crash in a punishing polar landscape. But when the rescue helicopter goes down, he decides to hike to a seasonal way-station in the hopes of saving himself and the badly injured female co-pilot (Maria Thelma Smáradóttir). 97 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Breakthrough” () Based on a true story, this faith-based film is formulaic, but also one of the more authentically moving entries in the genre. While playing with some friends on a frozen lake, the ice breaks and teenager John Smith (Marcel Ruiz) is submerged for 15 minutes. For 45 minutes he has no pulse, until his mother Joyce (Chrissy Metz) begins to pray over his unresponsive body in the ER. 90 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Captain Marvel" () In this pleasing, if predictable, excursion Vers (Brie Larson), is a member of an extraterrestrial race of warriors known as the Kree. She is fighting the lizardy green Skrull aliens when she crashes on Earth in the mid-‘90s. She makes an unlikely ally in Special Agent Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) and discovers through her hazy memories that she is Carol Danvers, a hot shot Air Force pilot who disappeared six years ago. 124 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Curse of La Llorona” () A hissing, pasty-faced zombie-ghost targets the children of a social worker (Linda Cardellini) in the latest addition to the Conjuring Universe. But any hopes of a creepy horror gem are dashed by the overacting, clumsy plot machinations and cliche-riddled “Gotcha!” moments. This film also screens in IMAX. 93 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Dumbo” () This film fulfills the checklist Disney remakes these days require: a young heroine interested in science, a dead mother, a father scarred by war. It inexplicably warps an inherently archaic story premise into politically correct revisionist history with a relevant message, suggesting that in the exploitative, bullying world of 1920s circuses, wildlife conservation was also a concern. 112 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Five Feet Apart” () This cystic fibrosis romantic drama feels like a real evolution in the sick teen movie genre because it’s actually a great movie and it doesn’t condescend to or try to cheer up anyone. There are no bucket lists — just an authentic portrait that feels real and lived-in, anchored by a pair of excellent performances by Haley Lu Richardson and Cole Sprouse. 116 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Gloria Bell” () Julianne Moore gives a luminous performance as the title character, a divorced mother of adult children and a regular at a Los Angeles disco. This is a quiet film, moving at its own pace, reflecting life with such realism it’s as if we’re invisible guests in Gloria Bell’s life. 101 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Hellboy” () In an R-rated reboot, David Harbour disappears into the red skin, hulking physique and sawed-off horns of the monster hunter Hellboy. There’s so much emphasis on hard-R violence in this blood-spattered, bone-cracking, resoundingly tedious mess, it’s as if story and character and involving storylines were left back in the trailer. 120 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roper,

Chicago Sun-Times

“Hotel Mumbai” () The gripping, nearly minute-by-minute account of the carnage that unfolded in the grand Taj Mahal Palace Hotel in Mumbai during the terror attacks of November 2008. It’s a meticulous depiction of the events that is at once disturbing, yet also deeply humane and moving, anchored by searing performances from its cast. 125 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World" () The third film in this animated franchise is as emotionally moving as it is beautifully made. Hiccup (Jay Baruchel) is now the Viking chief of his homeland, Berk, where humans and dragons live in harmony. But that idyll is threatened by dragon hunter Grimmel (F. Murray Abraham), who has his sights set on the last Night Fury dragon, Toothless. 104 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Isn’t It Romantic” () In this ingenious sendup of romantic comedies, Natalie (Rebel Wilson), is an entry-level architect at a New York firm where everyone takes advantage of her. She wakes up after a mugging in an alternate universe and suddenly, she’s the star of her own rom-com. But rather than take delight in this new world, she feels instantly trapped. 88 minutes. (PG-13)

— Jane Horwitz, The Washington Post

"The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part" () A candy-colored sugar rush with a nonstop parade of pop culture references, famous cameos and inside jokes, "The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part" doesn't quite match the original's spark and creativity, but it's a worthy chapter in the ever-expanding Lego movie universe. 93 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Little” () It’s hilarious to watch 14-year-old Marsai Martin play brash boss lady Jordan Sanders (also seamlessly portrayed as an adult by Regina Hall), who terrorizes her assistant, April (Issa Rae). But when she finds herself on the receiving end of a child’s wish she were little, Jordan wakes up in her 13-year-old body and needs April in a new way. We could all stand to remember and love who we were at our smallest moments. 108 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Mary Magdalene” (star rating unavailable) In this imperfect but affecting vision of New Testament times, Mary (Rooney Mara), a young woman chooses to follow a Nazarene teacher and healer named Jesus (Joaquin Phoenix). This movie which sets itself against the patriarchal myopia of the early and contemporary Christian church, becomes another tale of the Christ. You could see that as a failing. You could also call it the entire point. 120 minutes. (R)

— Justin Chang, Los Angeles Times

“Missing Link”() Victorian era explorer Sir Lionel (Hugh Jackman) is hired by lonely, last-of-his-kind sasquatch Mr. Link (Zach Galifianakis) to take him to the Himalayas, where he can join his probable cousins, the yeti. This film is visually stunning, with well-realized characters and humor. Yet somehow the film doesn’t sail easily enough between the yak-poo jokes and its more serious themes of loneliness and otherness. 95 minutes. (PG)

— Jane Horwitz, The Washington Post

“The Mustang” () This marks the feature directorial debut of the French actress, writer and director Laure de Clermont-Tonnerre. It’s solid if dramatically predictable work, part prison picture, part horse story. The film’s impressive as far is it goes, but it’s exceedingly tidy in its beat-by-beat developments and the supporting character roster struggles to make an impression. 96 minutes. (R)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“Penguins” () This frisky Disneynature film narrated by Ed Helms creates a character introduced as a 5-year-old Adelie penguin named Steve. He’s about to mate for life, become a bumbling, comic-relief Antarctica father and do his best to take the audience’s mind off the perpetual danger his family faces. This film also screens in IMAX. 76 minutes. (G)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“Pet Sematary” () Just like the reanimated kitties in Steven King’s novel, this remake of Mary Lambert’s truly chilling 1989 adaptation just isn’t the same after being dragged out of the grave. The film follows a young family who move to a new home outside of the city and learn they never really have to say goodbye to the ones they love. But this “Pet Sematary” is all bark and no bite. 101 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Shazam!” () In this playful and sharply self-aware film, brawny superhero Shazam (Zachary Levi) shares many of Superman’s attributes, but his alter-ego is a cynical 14-year-old foster kid, Billy Batson (Asher Angel). What makes it so fun is the charming dynamic between Shazam and his smart-aleck foster brother Freddy (Jack Dylan Grazer). 132 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Teen Spirit” () Polish-born British teen Violet (Elle Fanning) secretly auditions for a singing competition show called “Teen Spirit.” This film is mythic in its themes but exquisitely economic in its storytelling. It doesn’t try to be epic, to explain or comment — it’s just a snapshot of a glimpse of stardom for a kid who finds her salvation in music. 92 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Unplanned” (star rating unavailable) Abby Johnson’s passion surrounding a woman’s right to choose led her to become a spokesperson for Planned Parenthood, fighting to enact legislation for the cause she so deeply believed in. Until the day she saw something that changed everything, leading Abby to join her former enemies and become one of the most ardent pro-life speakers in America. 110 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Us” () A ’70s-inspired horror flick that crawls with genuinely creepy tension, lightened with dashes of well-earned humor. “Us” is a classic home invasion thriller that also traffics in dangerous doppelgangers, body doubles and twins. Director Jordan Peele demonstrates a mastery over filmmaking craft and tone much in the same way he did with “Get Out.” 116 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

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