Heads Up

"Alita: Battle Angel" — When cyborg Alita (Rosa Salazar) awakens with no memory of who she is, she is taken in by compassionate doctor Ido (Christoph Waltz). As Alita learns to navigate her new life and the treacherous streets of Iron City, she discovers she has unique fighting abilities that those in power will stop at nothing to control. This film opens Feb. 14 with early screenings Wednesday. This film also screens in IMAX 3D. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film's website

BTS World Tour "Love Yourself" in Seoul — Encore screenings of the 2018 Seoul concert of seven-member Korean boy band BTS. This film screens at 12:55 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $16 plus fees. 120 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

Climbing Film Night — The climbing documentaries "Born of Fire," "Wild and Wonderful," "Comfort Zone" and "Operation Moffat" will be screened, and renowned climbers John Long and Drew Ruana will speak. These films screen from 2 to 7 p.m. Saturday at Silver Moon Brewing in Bend. Cost is $5 at the door. Running times unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Silver Moon Brewing

"Dirty Dancing" — This 1987 romantic drama is set in the summer of 1963, when a 17-year-old nicknamed Baby (Jennifer Grey) vacations with her parents at a Catskills resort. There she meets Johnny (Patrick Swayze), the hotel dance instructor. Baby soon becomes Johnny's pupil in dance and love. Includes a celebrity tribute. This film screens at 4 p.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $16 plus fees. 105 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

"Isn't It Romantic" — New York City architect Natalie (Rebel Wilson) is under-appreciated at her job and a lifelong cynic when it comes to love. After being mugged, she wakes to discover her life has suddenly become her worst nightmare — a romantic comedy — and she is the leading lady. Also stars Liam Hemsworth, Adam Devine and Priyanka Chopra. This film opens Feb. 14 with early screenings Wednesday. 88 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film's website

"I Want to Eat Your Pancreas" — This animated film based on the award-winning novel by Yoru Sumino is an uplifting, coming-of-age tale about two polar opposite teens, one of them dying of pancreatic disease, who discover the true meaning of compassion. This film screens at 7 p.m. Thursday in Japanese with English subtitles and 12:55 p.m. Sunday dubbed in English at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50. 120 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

"Joni 75: A Birthday Celebration" — A tribute to singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell, filmed over two nights at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. Seal, James Taylor, Norah Jones, Diana Krall, Kris Kristofferson, Graham Nash and more perform songs from Mitchell's catalog of 19 studio albums. This film screens at 7 p.m. Thursday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend and 7 p.m. Tuesday at Sisters Movie House. Cost is $12 to $16. 120 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from The Music Center

Josh Groban "Bridges" from Madison Square Garden — Multi-platinum award-winning singer Groban was recorded live from the final U.S. stop of his 2018 "Bridges" tour and is joined on stage by Idina Menzel and Jennifer Nettles. This event screens at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $16. 95 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Regal Cinemas

The Metropolitan Opera: "Carmen" — Louis Langrée conducts Sir Richard Eyre’s lively production of Bizet's dramatic opera, "Carmen," starring Clémentine Margaine in the title role. This encore event screens live at 12:55 p.m. Saturday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $24 for adults, $22 for seniors and $18 for children, plus fees. 220 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

"A Nightmare on Elm Street" 35th Anniversary — In director Wes Craven's 1984 horror classic, the monstrous spirit of a slain janitor seeks revenge by invading the dreams of teenagers whose parents were responsible for his untimely death. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $5. 91 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

"Ordet" — A 1955 Danish drama that follows the lives of the Borgen family, as they deal with inner conflict, as well as religious conflict with each other, and the rest of the town. This film screens at 6 p.m. Sunday at St. Helens Hall, Trinity Episcopal Church in Bend. Free. 126 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

"RBG" — A documentary from directors Julie Cohen and Betsy West about the exceptional life and career of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who has developed a breathtaking legal legacy while becoming an unexpected pop culture icon. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Friday at Rodriguez Annex, Jefferson County Library in Madras. Free. 98 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

Unity Film Festival — A series of film screenings exploring issues contributing to disunity across racial, religious and political lines. "Mercy's Blessing," the award-winning short film based on true events, will screen at 2:30 p.m., and the documentary "To Light a Candle" will screen at 3:15 p.m. Sunday at the East Bend Public Library. Free. Running times unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Bend Baha'is

WHAT’S NEW

2019 Oscar Nominated Short Films — Animation (star rating unavailable) A screening of each 2019 Academy Award nominee in this category, "Animal Behavior," "Bao," "Late Afternoon," "One Small Step" and "Weekends." 60 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from ShortsTV

2019 Oscar Nominated Short Films — Documentary (star rating unavailable) A screening of each 2019 Academy Award nominee in this category, "A Night at the Garden," "Black Sheep," "End Game," "Lifeboat" and "Period. End of Sentence." 111 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from ShortsTV

2019 Oscar Nominated Short Films — Live Action (star rating unavailable) A screening of each 2019 Academy Award nominee in this category, "Detainment," "Fauve," "Marguerite," "Madre (Mother)" and "Skin." 109 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from ShortsTV

"Cold Pursuit" () Liam Neeson stars in what might look like another Liam Neeson thriller, but as the bodies pile up, it quickly becomes evident that this bat-bleep crazy story of a father seeking vengeance is an action comedy, with the emphasis on the comedy. 118 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Destroyer" () In director Karyn Kusama’s dirge of an LA noir, washed-up detective Erin Bell (Nicole Kidman) is plagued by survivor’s remorse over an undercover job gone wrong 15 years ago. The only interesting part of “Destroyer” exists in flashback, during the undercover operation wherein Erin and Chris (Sebastian Stan) infiltrate a desert crime gang. The script suffers from the hackneyed pretense that for women to be bravely “unlikable,” they have to be ghoulishly ugly, drunk, bad mothers and constantly degraded. 120 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Happy Death Day 2U" (star rating unavailable) In the follow-up to the 2017 horror film "Happy Death Day," hero Tree Gelbman (Jessica Rothe) discovers that dying over and over was surprisingly easier than the dangers that lie ahead. Also stars Ruby Modine and Israel Broussard. This film opens Wednesday. 120 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film's website

"The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part" () A candy-colored sugar rush with a nonstop parade of pop culture references, famous cameos and inside jokes, "The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part" doesn't quite match the original's spark and creativity, but it's a worthy chapter in the ever-expanding Lego movie universe. This film also screens in 3D and IMAX. 93 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“The Prodigy” () Creepy children are a mainstay of the horror genre. This chilling new horror film continues that fine tradition, with one intriguing complication: the young villain is a metaphor for parental failure. When 8-year-old Miles (Jackson Robert Scott) suddenly beats a classmate with a monkey wrench, his alarmed mother, Sarah (Taylor Schilling) takes him to a behavior specialist who suspects that another, more disturbed consciousness may inhabit Miles’s body, alongside his own. 100 minutes. (R)

— Alan Zilberman, The Washington Post

"Under the Eiffel Tower" (star rating unavailable) Stuart (Matt Walsh) is having a midlife crisis. After tagging along on his best friends' family vacation to Paris and humiliating himself by proposing to their 24-year-old daughter, he teams up with Liam (Reid Scott), a self-proclaimed ladies’ man. The two soon cross paths with Louise (Judith Godrèche). Love is on the horizon, but Stuart's going to have to get past a few hurdles in order to find it, in this romantic coming-of-middle-age comedy. 87 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from The Orchard

"What Men Want" (star rating unavailable) When successful sports agent Ali Davis (Taraji P. Henson) is passed up for a well-deserved promotion, she questions what else she needs to do to succeed in a man’s world ... until she gains the ability to hear men’s thoughts. With her newfound power, Ali looks to outsmart her colleagues as she races to sign the next basketball superstar. 117 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from the film's website

STILL SHOWING

"Aquaman" () DC Comics superhero Aquaman takes center stage and Jason Momoa’s great in close-up, surly and charismatic. But watching this movie is like getting trapped in a Wisconsin Dells waterpark, over a long weekend. Without a bartender in sight. This film is weighed down by klutzy screenwriting, horror-inspired jump scares and protracted, numbing brutality. 143 minutes (PG-13)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

"Ben is Back" () Some family members are more supportive than others as a 19-year-old opioid addict (Lucas Hedges) unexpectedly shows up on the doorstep on Christmas Eve, courtesy of a 24-hour pass from his rehab center. Julia Roberts' performance, as the fiercely protective (sometimes to a fault) mother, is the finest of her career. 103 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Bohemian Rhapsody" () In this Queen biopic, Rami Malek as frontman Freddie Mercury, channels the dueling relationship between Mercury's confidence and his insecurity. The rather uneven film is aided by a parade of legendary Queen hit singles. But it's hard to shake the feeling there’s a far more interesting film about Mercury yet to be made. 134 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Bumblebee" () This latest "Transformers" film is an ’80s-era origin story featuring the friendly yellow Transformer known as Bumblebee. Hailee Steinfeld stars as Charlie, a music-obsessed 18-year-old whose dusty yellow VW Beetle morphs into a scared, quivering, giant robot, she dubs Bumblebee. This prequel offers Bumblebee a chance to shine. 113 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Can You Ever Forgive Me?" () In the performance of her career, Melissa McCarthy plays a washed-up, desperate celebrity biographer who resorts to forging letters "written" by famous authors and selling them to collectors for cash. She's aided by a nomination-worthy script, vibrant cinematography and memorable supporting performances. 107 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"A Dog's Way Home" () Based on a book by W. Bruce Cameron, this film uses formulaic storytelling to spin the tale of Bella, a rescued pit bull who makes her way home after a two-year walkabout. The story is sweet enough, but Bella’s inner monologue is written in such a childish tone it lowers the discursive level of the whole movie to something quite childlike. Even the cute factor can’t obscure this film's narrative weaknesses. 137 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"The Favourite" () During the 18th-century reign of Queen Anne (Olivia Colman), her longtime friend (Rachel Weisz) and a new servant (Emma Stone) vie for the monarch's affections. The three stars bring out the best in each other in a bawdy, darkly funny, sharp-edged, foul-mouthed comedy of very BAD manners. 121 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Free Solo” () This often breathtaking real-life man-against-nature adventure is a spectacular, unnervingly immediate portrait of a climber attempting a death-defying ascent. The filmmakers follow champion free climber Alex Honnold as he sets out to be the first person ever to solo climb El Capitan. This film also screens in IMAX. 100 minutes. (PG-13)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

"Glass" () The third installment in writer/director M. Night Shyamalan's “Unbreakable” trilogy is both overwrought and undercooked. After the 15th twist ending, you just want to throw up your hands and yell, “We get it!” There’s a dank, dark air that weighs "Glass" down and it’s only the moments featuring James McAvoy as his "Split" character, Kevin Wendell Crumb (and Kevin's many alter egos), where it achieves liftoff. 129 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Green Book" ()Viggo Mortensen plays a thick-headed lunk from the Bronx and Mahershala Ali is the musician he's driving through the South in 1962, and both are nothing but believable. This is a friendship story and one of the best times I've had at the movies this year. 130 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"If Beale Street could Talk" () Based on a novel by James Baldwin and adapted by Barry Jenkins ("Moonlight"), this gripping movie — a timeless romance, a social commentary and more — features some of the most artfully crafted dialogue and finest performances of any movie this year. Newcomer KiKi Layne makes a spectacular screen debut as a teen in love with a man (Stephan James) falsely accused of rape. 119 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"The Kid Who Would Be King" () After 12-year-old Alex (Louis Ashbourne Serkis) finds a sword buried in a concrete piling, Merlin (Angus Imrie and Patrick Stewart) arrives to guide him on his quest to save Britain from the witchy villainess Morgana (Rebecca Ferguson). This film is far too long, but is simultaneously clever, inspiring and relevant. 120 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"The Least of These: The Graham Staines Story" (star rating unavailable) Told through the eyes of a fictional young journalist (Manav Banerjee), this film is based on the true story of Australian missionary Graham Staines (Stephen Baldwin), who met an unexpected fate in India in 1999 while serving the leper population. 127 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film's website

"Mary Poppins Returns" () While it would be all but impossible to match one of the most beloved and acclaimed musicals of all time, "Mary Poppins Returns" is a sequel worthy of the name. Emily Blunt is sensational, along with a stellar supporting cast including Lin-Manuel Miranda, in this wall-to-wall smile of a movie: big of heart and large in scale, brimming with show-stopping musical numbers. 130 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Miss Bala" () This remake of Mexico’s 2011 Oscar entry stars Gina Rodriguez as Gloria, a young Mexican-American makeup artist from LA who gets caught up in corruption and cartels while visiting a friend who is competing in the Miss Baja California pageant. This is a story about a good girl who has to do bad things to survive. But ultimately, Gloria is rewarded, not haunted, by her violent turn. It’s a Hollywood ending that completely misses the point of what “Miss Bala” was and should be. 104 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"The Mule" () This offensive debacle is adapted by screenwriter Nick Schenk from a New York Times Magazine article, “The Sinaloa Cartel’s 90-year Old Drug Mule” by Sam Dolnick. The film is a fairly straightforward adaptation of the true story, but the racist cultural stereotypes and truly appalling treatment of women is all thanks to Schenk and the film's star, Clint Eastwood. 116 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"On the Basis of Sex" ()This is a well-intentioned and occasionally inspirational but mostly flat "origins story" about Ruth Bader Ginsburg's nascent career and her lifelong love affair with her husband, Marty. The British actress Felicity Jones never seems particularly well-suited for the role of the future Supreme Court justice. 120 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Serenity" () This movie is about a battered woman (Anne Hathaway) trying to persuade her ex-husband (Matthew McConaughey) to murder her current one (Jason Clarke), and it is also absolutely not about that. The dialogue is bad, the performances are cartoonish and the scenario abounds with cliche and lazy shorthand. A humongous plot twist is, yes, audacious. But none of those things mean that the movie works. 106 minutes. (R)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

"Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse () The best "Spider-Man" movie yet, and one of the best 2018 films of any kind, is peppered with clever visual touches and crackling good inside jokes. The story about a new Spidey meeting versions of the character in alternate universes is a brilliant, exuberant, soaring and original adventure. 117 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Stan & Ollie" () Thanks to the subtle brilliance of Steve Coogan as Stan Laurel and John C. Reilly as Oliver Hardy, even someone who's never heard of the 1930s movie comedy duo likely would see how magical these two were together. This Hollywood biopic is sweet-natured, occasionally melancholy and thoroughly entertaining. 97 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Time

“A Star is Born” () In his directorial debut, Bradley Cooper (also the leading man) strikes the perfect balance between a showbiz fable and an intimate story with universal truths. As the protege who rockets to fame, Lady Gaga is a natural presence. This film also screens in IMAX. 136 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"They Shall Not Grow Old" () A remarkable new documentary from director Peter Jackson that uses restored footage and oral histories recorded by British veterans to tell the story of the men who fought in World War I . Jackson took this often grainy, black-and-white silent footage from hand-cranked cameras and sharpened it, colorized it, added sound and more. It’s an unexpectedly contemporary-feeling experience. This film also screens in 3D. 99 minutes. (R)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

"The Upside" () Parolee Dell (Kevin Hart) stumbles into a job assisting an uber-wealthy quadriplegic man (Bryan Cranston). Their chemistry is easy, unlike the forced bits and riffs, weak writing and shaky character transitions that bedevil the rest of the film. It’s a struggle to find the bright side to this rather hackneyed film. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Vice" () Christian Bale inhabits former Vice President Dick Cheney down to his distinctive, sideways grimace and stentorian inhalations. But strip away the gimmicks and what may seem exhilaratingly brash begins to look glib and relatively tame. Structurally, "Vice" is a mess, leaving few illuminating ideas to ponder. 132 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

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