Heads Up

"Airplane!" — In this 1980 comedy, a man afraid to fly must ensure that a plane lands safely after the pilots become sick. This film screens at 10 p.m. Monday at The Capitol in Bend. Free 88 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

"The Art of Flight" — A snowboard documentary featuring Travis Rice, Mark Landvik and John Jackson. This film screens outdoors at 8 p.m. Friday at LOGE Entrada in Bend. In the event of rain, screening will be canceled. Free. 80 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

BendFilm presents "The Dawn Wall" — In this documentary, free climber Tommy Caldwell and climbing partner Kevin Jorgeson attempt to scale the seemingly impossible 3,000-foot-high Dawn Wall of El Capitan. This film screens at 7 p.m. Friday at the Tower Theatre in Bend. Free for BendFilm members or $15 for nonmembers. Tickets required to guarantee seating available at bendfilm.org.

— Synopsis from the Tower Theatre

"The Death of Superman" and "Reign of the Supermen" animated double feature — In "The Death of Superman," the Justice League rallies to meet the otherworldly menace of an unstoppable asteroid, with an epic showdown between Superman and Doomsday. In the new "Reign of the Supermen." The world is still reeling from the death of Superman when four superheroes arrive in Metropolis, battling to be the reincarnation of the Man of Steel. These films screen at 12:55 p.m. Sunday and 8 p.m. Monday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 165 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

"Dragon Ball Super: Broly" — In the latest chapter of this animated fantasy series, Goku and Vegeta encounter Broly, a Saiyan warrior unlike any fighter they've faced before. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 100 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

"In Search of Haydn" — Director Phil Grabsky's third documentary explores the work and influence of composer Joseph Haydn, one of the greatest musical innovators who has since been overshadowed by his younger contemporaries Mozart and Beethoven. This film screens at 7:15 p.m. Tuesday at Sisters Movie House. Cost is $12.50. 102 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from the film's website

"Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again" — In this movie musical set five years after the events of "Mamma Mia!" (2008), Sophie (Amanda Seyfried) prepares for the grand reopening of the Hotel Bella Donna in Greece as she learns more about her mother's past. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Friday at Rodriguez Annex, Jefferson County Library in Madras. Free. 114 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

The Metropolitan Opera Live: "Adriana Lecouvreur" — Anna Netrebko sings the title role of Adriana Lecouvreur, in Cilea's opera about the great 18th-century actress in love with the military hero Maurizio, sung by Piotr Beczata. This event screens live at 9:55 a.m. Saturday and in encore screenings at 1 and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $24 for adults, $22 for seniors and $18 for children, plus fees. 240 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

"Modest Heroes: Volume 1" — The first in an anthology of three tales from the new Japanese animation studio founded by Yoshiaki Nishimura. "Modest Heroes" explores ideas of heroism in everyday life. This film screens at 7 p.m. Thursday in Japanese with English subtitles, and at 12:55 p.m. Saturday dubbed in English, at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 70 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

WHAT’S NEW

"Ben is Back" () Some family members are more supportive than others as a 19-year-old opioid addict (Lucas Hedges) unexpectedly shows up on the doorstep on Christmas Eve, courtesy of a 24-hour pass from his rehab center. Julia Roberts' performance, as the fiercely protective (sometimes to a fault) mother, is the finest of her career. 103 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"If Beale Street could Talk" () Based on a novel by James Baldwin and adapted by Barry Jenkins ("Moonlight"), this gripping movie — a timeless romance, a social commentary and more — features some of the most artfully crafted dialogue and finest performances of any movie this year. Newcomer KiKi Layne makes a spectacular screen debut as a teen in love with a man (Stephan James) falsely accused of rape. 119 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“A Dog’s Way Home” () Based on a book by W. Bruce Cameron, this film uses formulaic storytelling to spin the tale of Bella, a rescued pit bull who makes her way home after a two-year walkabout. The story is sweet enough, but Bella’s inner monologue is written in such a childish tone it lowers the discursive level of the whole movie to something quite childlike. Dog lovers will likely warm to the tale, but even the cute factor can’t obscure this film’s narrative weaknesses. 137 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"On the Basis of Sex" ()This is a well-intentioned and occasionally inspirational but mostly flat "origins story" about Ruth Bader Ginsburg's nascent career and her lifelong love affair with her husband, Marty. The British actress Felicity Jones never seems particularly well-suited for the role of the future Supreme Court justice. 120 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Replicas" (star rating unavailable) In this sci-fi thriller, neuro-scientist William Foster (Keanu Reeves) is on the verge of successfully transferring human consciousness into a computer when his family is tragically killed in a car crash. Desperate to resurrect them, William recruits fellow scientist Ed Whittle (Thomas Middleditch) to help him secretly clone their bodies and create replicas. 107 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film's website

"The Upside" () Comedian Kevin Hart’s first turn in a more serious role — a remake of the award-winning French hit “The Intouchables,” across from Bryan Cranston and Nicole Kidman — should have been a slam dunk. And yet, it’s a struggle to find the bright side to this rather hackneyed film. Parolee Dell (Hart) stumbles into a job as the "life auxiliary" to an uber-wealthy quadriplegic man (Cranston). Their chemistry is easy, unlike the forced bits and riffs, weak writing and shaky character transitions that bedevil the rest of the film. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

STILL SHOWING

"Aquaman" () DC Comics superhero Aquaman (born in 1941) takes center stage and Jason Momoa’s great in close-up, surly and charismatic. But watching this movie is like getting trapped in a Wisconsin Dells water park, over a long weekend. Without a bartender in sight. This film is weighed down by klutzy screenwriting, horror-inspired jump scares and protracted, numbing brutality. 143 minutes (PG-13)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

"Becoming Astrid" () An engrossing, beautifully acted new film depicting a dramatic portion of the life of "Pippi Longstocking" author, Astrid Lindgren (Alba August). The Swedish writer’s tumultuous early years take up most of the acreage in “Becoming Astrid.” Throughout the film August acquits herself brilliantly; the woman we come to know is a tangle of impulses and qualities and feels vibrantly alive. 123 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“Bohemian Rhapsody" () In this Queen biopic, Rami Malek as frontman Freddie Mercury, channels the dueling relationship between Mercury's confidence and his insecurity. The rather uneven film is aided by a parade of legendary Queen hit singles. But it's hard to shake the feeling there’s a far more interesting film about Mercury yet to be made. 134 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Bumblebee" () This latest "Transformers" film is an ’80s-era origin story featuring the friendly yellow Transformer known as Bumblebee. Hailee Steinfeld stars as Charlie, a music-obsessed 18-year-old whose dusty yellow VW Beetle morphs into a scared, quivering, giant robot, she dubs Bumblebee. This prequel offers Bumblebee a chance to shine. 113 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Dr. Seuss' The Grinch" () The new animated version of the beloved Dr. Seuss story stars Benedict Cumberbatch as the Grinch and is faithful to the book, particularly in the visual style. The animation is stunning and the story is padded out with a bit more backstory for Miss Cindy Lou Who (Cameron Seely) and her frazzled single mom. Anything that isn’t directly from Seuss’ book simply feels like underwritten fluff. 90 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Escape Room" (star rating unavailable) A psychological thriller about six strangers who find themselves trapped in circumstances beyond their control and must use their wits to find the clues to escape or die. Stars Taylor Russell, Logan Miller, Deborah Ann Woll, Jay Ellis, Tyler Labine and Nik Dodani. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film's website

"The Favorite" () During the 18th-century reign of Queen Anne (Olivia Colman), her longtime friend (Rachel Weisz) and a new servant (Emma Stone) vie for the monarch's affections. The three stars bring out the best in each other in a bawdy, darkly funny, sharp-edged, foul-mouthed comedy of very BAD manners. 121 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Free Solo” () This often breathtaking real-life man-against-nature adventure is a spectacular, unnervingly immediate portrait of a climber attempting a death-defying ascent. The filmmakers follow champion free climber Alex Honnold as he sets out to be the first person ever to solo climb El Capitan. 100 minutes. (PG-13)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

"Green Book" ()Viggo Mortensen plays a thick-headed lunk from the Bronx and Mahershala Ali is the musician he's driving through the South in 1962, and both are nothing but believable. This is a friendship story and one of the best times I've had at the movies this year. 130 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Holmes & Watson” (star rating unavailable) In this version of the detective story, Sherlock Holmes (Will Ferrell) and Dr. Watson (John C. Reilly) have grown so close that Holmes can predict Watson’s moves at rock, paper, scissors and Battleship. There is intermittent joy to be found in the bromance of Ferrell and Reilly's enduring partnership, but the men’s sparring looks more tired than usual. It’s not really a case worth cracking. 89 minutes. (PG-13)

— Ben Kenigsberg, New York Times

"Mary Poppins Returns" () While it would be all but impossible to match one of the most beloved and acclaimed musicals of all time, "Mary Poppins Returns" is a sequel worthy of the name. Emily Blunt is sensational, along with a stellar supporting cast including Lin-Manuel Miranda, in this wall-to-wall smile of a movie: big of heart and large in scale, brimming with show-stopping musical numbers. 130 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Mary Queen of Scots" () Impressively staged and sometimes cleverly written, this 16th-century story of men interfering with the ambitions of Mary Stuart (Saoirse Ronan) and Queen Elizabeth I (Margot Robbie) often comes across as stultified and stagnant. 125 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"The Mule" () This offensive debacle is adapted by screenwriter Nick Schenk from a New York Times Magazine article, “The Sinaloa Cartel’s 90-year Old Drug Mule” by Sam Dolnick. The film is a fairly straightforward adaptation of the true story, but the racist cultural stereotypes and truly appalling treatment of women is all thanks to Schenk and the film's star, Clint Eastwood. 116 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Ralph Breaks the Internet" () The hapless video game "villain" (John C. Reilly) from "Wreck-It Ralph" and his sharp-witted friend Vanellope (Sarah Silverman) venture out of the arcade into the World Wide Web in search of a replacement part. There were times when the sweet-natured animated adventure was brimming with so much stimuli, I had to remind myself to laugh. 114 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Second Act" () Denied a promotion because of her lack of education, a top-notch retail worker (Jennifer Lopez) moves on to a cushier job with help from a doctored resume. It's as though somebody found a forgotten print of a long-lost J. Lo comedy from 2002, dusted it off and presented it as a 2018 release. 104 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse () The best "Spider-Man" movie yet, and one of the best 2018 films of any kind, is peppered with clever visual touches and crackling good inside jokes. The story about a new Spidey meeting versions of the character in alternate universes is a brilliant, exuberant, soaring and original adventure. 117 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“A Star is Born” () In his directorial debut, Bradley Cooper (also the leading man) strikes the perfect balance between a showbiz fable and an intimate story with universal truths. As the protege who rockets to fame, Lady Gaga is a winning, natural presence, even in the scenes where she’s nowhere near a piano or a microphone. This film also screens in IMAX. 136 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Vice" () Christian Bale inhabits former Vice President Dick Cheney down to his distinctive, sideways grimace and wheezily stentorian inhalations. But strip away the gimmicks and what may seem exhilaratingly brash begins to look glib and relatively tame. Structurally, "Vice" is a mess, never knowing quite when to end and leaving few penetrating or illuminating ideas to ponder. 132 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

"Welcome to Marwen" () Based on the true story of Mark Hogancamp (Steve Carell) who was left with a traumatic brain injury after a brutal assault and sought refuge in a wholly invented world of World War II scenarios involving his alter ego, Capt. Hogancamp. But the stop-motion animation scenes and toggling between the fantasy town of Marwen and Hogancamp’s real world becomes a source of aggravation. 116 minutes. (PG-13)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

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