Heads Up

"Angst: Raising Awareness Around Anxiety" — BendFilm and Cascades Academy present this documentary that tells the stories of many children and teens discussing their anxiety and its impacts on their lives and relationships, and how they've found solutions and hope. Includes a special interview with Olympian Michael Phelps. A panel discussion will follow the screening. This film screens at 6 p.m. Thursday at Cascades Academy in Bend. Free, registration required at bit.ly/2QA6b04 or 541-382-0699. Running time unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

"Buttons: A New Musical Film" — This musical fairy tale is narrated by Robert Redford and Kate Winslet and set during a time of robber barons, mills and rising industry. Two orphan children meet unexpected visitors (Dick Van Dyke & Angela Lansbury) who turn the tide of events and change their lives forever. Includes a special tribute to Gene Kelly. This film screens at 12:55 p.m. Saturday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $15, plus fees. 115 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

"A Christmas Story" — In the 1940s, a young boy named Ralphie (Peter Billingsley) attempts to convince his parents, his teacher and Santa that a Red Ryder BB gun really is the perfect Christmas gift. This film screens at noon Saturday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $5, plus fees. 100 minutes. (G)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

George Takei's "Allegiance" — This Broadway musical presents the untold American story of one family’s extraordinary journey. Their loyalty was questioned and their freedom taken away, but their spirit could never be broken. Includes a conversation with the creative team. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $15, plus fees. 90 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

"Great Composers: In Search of Mozart" — This documentary traces the composer’s life through his music and extensive correspondence, dispelling many common myths. Over 80 works are featured in chronological order. This film screens at 3:15 p.m. Sunday at Sisters Movie House. Cost is $12.50. 129 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Sisters Movie House

"Higher" — The third installment of the Deeper, Further, Higher trilogy. Backcountry snowboarder Jeremy Jones leaves tracks in Jackson Hole and Lake Tahoe, while also making history with far-flung first descents in the Eastern Alaska Range and the Himalayas. This film screens at 8 p.m. Friday outdoors (or indoors at the cafe in the event of rain) at LOGE Entrada in Bend. Free. Running time unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from LOGE Entrada

"Jeff Lowe's Metanoia" — From the top of the world to the end of the line, this documentary follows the life and climbs of legendary alpinist Jeff Lowe, through his visionary ascents around the world up to his dance with a terminal disease. Presented by the Oregon Outdoor Alliance. This film screens at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at 10 Barrel Brewing Co. East in Bend. Cost is $10. 84 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

"Jim Henson's Holiday Special" — Celebrate the holidays with two remastered specials from filmmaker and puppeteer Jim Henson: "Emmet Otter's Jug-Band Christmas" and "The Bells of Fraggle Rock." Also includes a new featurette with a special guest. This film screens at 4 and 7 p.m. Monday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 for adults and $10 for children, plus fees. 90 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

"Love Actually" — This 2003 romantic comedy follows the love lives of eight different couples in the month before Christmas in London, England, in loosely interrelated tales. Stars Hugh Grant, Martine McCutcheon, Liam Neeson, Emma Thompson, Colin Firth, Keira Knightly and more. This film screens at 7 p.m. Friday at the Tower Theatre in Bend. Cost is $7 to $12 (plus fees). 145 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

"Mirai" — This new anime feature tells the story of 4-year-old Kun, who encounters strange guests from the past and future — including the teenage incarnation of his baby sister Mirai — and journeys through time and space. This film screens at 12:55 p.m. Saturday dubbed in English at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. It also screens Friday through Wednesday at Sisters Movie House (see movie times for details). Cost is $12.50 plus fees at Regal; or $10.25 for adults, $8.50 for seniors and $7.50 for children and students at Sisters. 115 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

National Theatre Live: "Antony and Cleopatra" — Recorded live in London, Ralph Fiennes and Sophie Okonedo play Shakespeare’s famous fated couple in his great tragedy of politics, passion and power. This film screens at 7 p.m. Thursday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $18, plus fees. 220 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

"Office Space" — Three company workers who hate their jobs decide to rebel against their greedy boss in this 1999 comedy. This film screens at 6 p.m. Saturday at Monkless Belgian Ales in Bend. Free. 89 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

"Once Upon a Deadpool" — A dysfunctional fairy tale in which anti-hero Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds) kidnaps actor Fred Savage and reads him a bedtime story (in the same framing device as Savage's 1987 film, "The Princess Bride"). This film opens Wednesday with early screenings Tuesday. 116 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film's website

"The Polar Express" — On Christmas Eve, a young boy embarks on a magical adventure to the North Pole on the Polar Express, while learning about friendship, bravery and the spirit of Christmas. This film screens at 12:10 and 10:15 p.m. Friday and Saturday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. Cost is $4, late screenings for ages 21 and over only. 102 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

"Schindlers List" 25th Anniversary — Stephen Spielberg's 1993 Academy Award-winning film has been digitally remastered and re-released. In German-occupied Poland during World War II, Oskar Schindler (Liam Neeson) gradually becomes concerned for his Jewish workforce after witnessing their persecution by the Nazi Germans. This film screens at 7 p.m. Thursday, with various screening times continuing through Wednesday. See movie times for details. 195 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

"The Shop Around the Corner" — Two gift shop employees (Jimmy Stewart and Margaret Sullavan) who can barely stand each other, begin falling in love as anonymous pen pals. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Friday at Rodriguez Annex, Jefferson County Library in Madras. Free. 99 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

"White Christmas" — In this classic 1954 musical, two song-and-dance men (Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye) team up after the war to become one of the hottest acts in show business. They join forces with a sister act (Rosemary Clooney and Vera Ellen) and trek to Vermont for a white Christmas. This film screens at 2 and 7 p.m. Sunday and Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 130 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

WHAT’S NEW

"At Eternity's Gate" () Playing Vincent van Gogh, Willem Dafoe gives a mesmerizing performance in an inconsistent and uneven film. The isolated glimpses of originality and poetry aren't enough to offset the long and often tiresome attempts to dissect van Gogh's mindset. 110 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Green Book" () Viggo Mortensen plays a thick-headed lunk from the Bronx and Mahershala Ali is the musician he's driving through the South in 1962, and both are nothing but believable. This is a friendship story and one of the best times I've had at the movies this year. 130 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Maria By Callas" ()An immersive, often deliciously sensuous documentary portrait of the late opera star Maria Callas. Director Tom Volf uses the subject's own words — from letters, diary entries, television interviews and her own memoirs — to narrate a succession of ravishing, rarely seen images. Some of its most compelling material focuses on the legendary love triangle between Callas, Aristotle Onassis and Jacqueline Kennedy. 113 minutes. (PG)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

"The Wife" () As a famous author (Jonathan Pryce) accepts the Nobel Prize, his wife (Glenn Close) reassesses her longtime role as his assistant and chief parent to their children in a sharply written, character-driven, intense domestic drama. Both actors are transcendent. 100 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

STILL SHOWING

“Bohemian Rhapsody" () In this Queen biopic, Rami Malek as frontman Freddie Mercury, channels the dueling relationship between Mercury's confidence and his insecurity. The rather uneven film is aided by a parade of legendary Queen hit singles. But it's hard to shake the feeling there’s a far more interesting film about Mercury yet to be made. 134 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Border" (star rating unavailable) This Swedish film from director Ali Abbasi aims to startle in overt and subtextual ways. Tina (Eva Melander) is an unusual woman who works security at a Swedish port and can literally sniff out guilt. Then she meets Vore (Eero Milonoff), a man who has a thorough understanding of the secrets that he and Tina share and that Tina’s father, who’s struggling with dementia, has withheld from her. 110 minutes. (R)

— Ben Kenigsberg, New York Times

"Boy Erased" () In yet another effective and authentic performance, Lucas Hedges plays a teenager sent by his parents to a "conversion camp" designed to reprogram people who "think" they're gay. Cast as his parents are Russell Crowe and Nicole Kidman, and it's something special to see the Oscar winners disappearing into their characters in this understated but impactful film. 114 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Can You Ever Forgive Me?" () In the performance of her career, Melissa McCarthy plays a washed-up, desperate celebrity biographer who resorts to forging letters "written" by famous authors and selling them to collectors for cash. She's aided by a nomination-worthy script, vibrant cinematography and memorable supporting performances. 107 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Creed II" () Just as Adonis Creed (Michael B. Jordan) is enjoying his champion status, who should come along but a challenger: the son of Ivan Drago, who killed Creed's father in the ring. Though we've seen this movie before (and more than once), there's a strong beating heart to this franchise. 128 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Dr. Seuss' The Grinch" () The new animated version of the beloved Dr. Seuss story stars Benedict Cumberbatch as the Grinch and is faithful to the book, particularly in the visual style. The animation is stunning and the story is padded out with a bit more backstory for Miss Cindy Lou Who (Cameron Seely) and her frazzled single mom. Anything that isn’t directly from Seuss’ book simply feels like underwritten fluff. 90 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald" () This new chapter in the adventures of magizoologist Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne) takes a turn for the dark side that will satisfy the franchise's adult fans. Newt is dispatched to Paris by his former Hogwarts teacher, Albus Dumbledore (Jude Law), to go after the fugitive wizard Gellert Grindelwald (Johnny Depp). 134 minutes. (PG-13)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“Free Solo” () This often breathtaking real-life man-against-nature adventure is a spectacular, unnervingly immediate portrait of a climber attempting a death-defying ascent. The filmmakers follow champion free climber Alex Honnold as he sets out to be the first person ever to solo climb El Capitan. 100 minutes. (PG-13)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

"The Front Runner" () Jason Reitman directs a whip-smart, funny and poignant look back at the infidelity allegations that ended the 1988 presidential campaign of Sen. Gary Hart, a scandal that forever changed the political landscape. Hugh Jackman does a solid job of capturing Hart's impressive grasp of the issues — but also his arrogance and his unbounding ego. 113 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Instant Family" () Pete (Mark Wahlberg) and Ellie (Rose Byrne) are a nice, upper-middle class white couple missing one thing: kids. They end up adopting a set of three siblings after cautiously approaching a group of teenagers at an adoption fair. “Instant Family” hits that sweet-spot of hilarious and heartwarming, where the sweetness and tears are well-deserved. 119 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Nutcracker and the Four Realms" () A visual spectacle that is wildly imaginative and charming, harnessed to a screenplay that pads out the fable at its heart with an at times needlessly busy narrative. Clara Stahlbaum (Mackenzie Foy) enters an alternate universe with four realms, where all is not as it seems. 99 minutes. (PG)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

"The Old Man and the Gun" () Inspired by true events, this whimsical film stars Robert Redford in a damn good performance as a career criminal who keeps on committing crimes, keeps on getting caught — and keeps on escaping. It's said to be Redford's final film as an actor and serves as a fitting curtain call. 93 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"The Possession of Hannah Grace" (star rating unavailable) When a cop (Shay Mitchell) who is just out of rehab takes the graveyard shift in a city hospital morgue, she faces a series of bizarre, violent events caused by an evil entity in one of the corpses. 86 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from the film's website

"Ralph Breaks the Internet" () The hapless video game "villain" (John C. Reilly) from "Wreck-It Ralph" and his sharp-witted friend Vanellope (Sarah Silverman) venture out of the arcade into the World Wide Web in search of a replacement part. There were times when the sweet-natured animated adventure was brimming with so much stimuli, I had to remind myself to laugh. This film also screens in IMAX. 114 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Robin Hood" () This Robin Hood (Taron Egerton) has a traumatic backstory, having been conscripted to fight in the Crusades. A Moorish warrior (Jamie Foxx) trains the young lord to infiltrate the inner circle of the Sheriff (Ben Mendelsohn) while robbing the coffers blind. It is certainly visually striking, though the story loses steam. This “Robin Hood” has brought a whole new dimension to this age-old tale.116 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Smallfoot" () It's not often an animated children's movie features lessons about critical thinking. But in this zippy, silly, zany, cheery little tale, a skeptical Yeti (voice of Channing Tatum) in a land of Yetis learns the value of questioning the status quo. 96 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“A Star is Born” () In his directorial debut, Bradley Cooper (also the leading man) strikes the perfect balance between a showbiz fable and an intimate story with universal truths. As the protege who rockets to fame, Lady Gaga is a winning, natural presence, even in the scenes where she’s nowhere near a piano or a microphone. This film also screens in IMAX. 136 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Venom” () This dark, wacky outing is a mess, but wow, is it ever a fun, fascinating mess. Tom Hardy plays Eddie Brock, the unwilling host body for alien Symbiote Venom, who turns him into an unlikely killing machine. Their banter is funny, intentionally so, and Hardy’s wild-eyed performance and quirky asides invite you to laugh at the silly madness of it all. 112 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Widows" () Viola Davis deserves a best actress nomination for her performance as a criminal's wife plotting a heist of her own. Even the relatively peripheral characters are unforgettable in this film — part political thriller, part family drama, part race and class commentary. This is one of the best movies of 2018. 128 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

"Wildlife" () An absorbing yet off-kilter domestic drama adapted Richard Ford's disturbing 1990 novel. When Jerry (Jake Gyllenhall) is fired from his job and settles for a lower-paying job fighting a remote wildfire, his lonely and resentful wife Jeanette (Carey Mulligan) begins a dalliance with a well-off, much older man. Their bewildered 14-year old son Joe (Ed Oxenbould), tries to maintain the peace. 104 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

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