Heads Up

“A Boy Named Charlie Brown” — This 1969 animated feature was the first film based on Charles M. Schulz’s “Peanuts” comic strip. In it, Charlie Brown sets out to qualify for the national spelling bee in New York City. This film screens at noon on Saturday at the Tin Pan Theater in Bend. Cost is $5, plus fees. Advance tickets available at bendfilm.org. 86 minutes. (G)

— Synopsis from BendFilm

“Apocalypse Now: Final Cut” — Director Francis Ford Coppola’s 40-year final cut of the 1979 classic Vietnam War film, “Apocalypse Now,” starring Martin Sheen, Marlon Brando and Robert Duvall. This film screens at 1:30 and 6 p.m. at the Tin Pan Theater in Bend. Cost is $10. 183 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Camp Nowhere” — Morris “Mud” Himmel (Jonathan Jackson) hates going to summer camp, and would do anything to get out of it. Together with his friends, he hatches a plan to trick all the parents into sending them to a camp of his own design, which would actually be a parent-free paradise. This film screens outdoors at 8 p.m. Friday at LOGE Entrada in Bend. Free. 96 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Deconstructing the Beatles’ Abbey Road: Side Two” — Director Scott Freiman’s journey into the creative process of The Beatles performances and recording sessions continues as he explores the last studio album the group recorded, 1969’s “Abbey Road.” Presented by BendFilm and Cascade School of Music. This film screens at 1:30, 5:30 and 8:15 p.m. Monday (doors open 30 minutes prior to showtimes) at the Tin Pan Theater in Bend. Cost is $7. 87 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from BendFilm

“Motherload” — A crowd-sourced documentary about a new mom’s quest to understand and promote the cargo bike movement in a gas-powered, digital and divided world. Cargo bike test rides will be available. This film screens outdoors at 8:30 p.m. Thursday (doors open at 6 p.m.) at Bend Brewing Company. Free. 81 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

Movies in the Park: “Ratatouille” — In this 2007 animated comedy, a rat who can cook makes an unusual alliance with a young kitchen worker at a famous restaurant. Family activities including food, games and more will commence at 6 p.m. Friday followed by the film screening at dusk (approximately 8:30 p.m.) at Stryker Park in Prineville. Free. 111 minutes. (G)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“My Neighbor Totoro” — In this anime adventure from Academy Award-winning director Hayao Miyazaki, Satsuki and her sister Mei move with their father to a new home in the countryside and discover the house and nearby woods are full of strange and delightful creatures who can only be seen by children. This film screens at 12:55 p.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday dubbed in English, and at 7 p.m. Monday in Japanese with English subtitles, at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 plus fees. 104 minutes. (G)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

WHAT’S NEW

“Angel Has Fallen” () This time in the series it’s our hero, Secret Service agent Mike Banning (Gerard Butler) who has fallen. After a drone attack on the president during a fishing trip, Banning wakes up cuffed to a hospital bed, framed to take the fall for the hit. Indicted and imprisoned, then kidnapped by the very mercenaries who did try to kill the president, Banning has no choice but to go rogue (as per usual). The tone of “Angel” is far more somber than the wise-cracking “Olympus” or the frothing, jingoistic “London.” The weight makes the film strangely dull at times. 120 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Luce” () A former child soldier from war-torn Eritrea is adopted by a Virginia couple (Naomi Watts and Tim Roth) and grows to be a loving son and a top high school student (Kelvin Harrison Jr.). But evidence of residual effects of war starts to emerge in a film that doesn’t always need dialogue to expertly communicate valuable insights. 109 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Maiden” () It doesn’t get much more inspiring than the incredible story of Maiden, the first yacht crewed entirely by women to compete in the Whitbread Round the World Race in 1989. This documentary chronicles the fight the women faced just to get onto the water. Compared to the sexism and obstacles they faced on land, the grueling challenges of the high seas were a walk in the park. This stirring documentary recounts not just the feminist achievement, but a triumph of the human spirit. 97 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Overcomer” (star rating unavailable) When the largest manufacturing plant in town suddenly shuts down and hundreds of families begin moving away, high school basketball coach John Harrison (Alex Kendrick) must come to grips with the challenges facing his family and his team. Urged to fill-in and coach a sport he doesn’t know or like, John is frustrated and questioning his worth … until he crosses paths with a student (Priscilla C. Shirer) struggling with her own journey. 115 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“The Peanut Butter Falcon” () A sweetly comic drama about a young man with Down syndrome who dreams of becoming a professional wrestler. Zak (Zack Gottsagen) escapes from the retirement home where he has been warehoused and stows away on a boat stolen by Tyler (Shia LeBeouf), a crab fisherman who is also on the lam. Lifting its story beats directly from “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” the two gradually come to see that they need each other. 98 minutes. PG-13.

— Travis DeShong, The Washington Post

“Ready or Not” () In a warped, audacious and absolutely ridiculous slapstick gorefest, Samara Weaving plays a bride forced to battle her groom’s family in a homicidal wedding-night game of hide and seek. It’s like “Crazy Rich Asians,” only much, much crazier. 95 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

STILL SHOWING

“47 Meters Down: Uncaged” (star rating unavailable) Four teen girls (Corinne Foxx, Sistine Stallone, Sophie Nélisse and Brianne Tju) diving in a ruined underwater city quickly learn the claustrophobic labyrinth of submerged caves they’ve entered is the territory of the deadliest shark species. 89 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Aladdin” () Despite a couple of large, genie-blue stumbles along the way, Guy Ritchie’s live-action version of Disney’s “Aladdin” is on balance a colorful and lively adventure suitable for all ages and a touching romance featuring two attractive leads. I liked the flying carpet, too. 128 minutes (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“The Angry Birds Movie 2” () Hot-tempered bird Red (voiced by Jason Sudeikis) and his feathered friends must join forces with their former enemies, the pigs, to defeat a common foe. In some ways, “The Angry Birds Movie 2” is standard, formulaic kiddie fare. Yet its distinctive character design and ambitious world-building will keep audiences interested. This film also screens in 3D. 96 minutes. (PG)

— Pat Padua, The Washington Post

“The Art of Racing in the Rain” () Thanks in large part to Kevin Costner’s voice work as a dog taking us through the life of his race car-driver owner (Milo Ventimiglia), this adaptation of the best-selling novel comes close to winning us over. But eventually it feels as if we’ve been inundated with TOO many scenes designed to turn on the waterworks. 109 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Blinded by the Light” () This ode to Bruce Springsteen, breaking free and belonging revels in Springsteen’s greatest hits with vibrant, vicarious exhilaration. Javed (Viveik Kalra), is a Pakistani immigrant teenager living in a working-class town in southeast England in 1987. Feeling like an outsider in his own home, he discovers Springsteen’s music as he seeks to find himself. 114 minutes. (PG-13)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Brian Banks” () This drama is based on a true story about a false accusation and its aftermath. Anchored by the charismatic Aldis Hodge, the film uses the framework of a courtroom procedural to explore how our criminal justice system casts aside some of the same people it should protect. 99 minutes. (PG-13)

— Alan Zilberman, The Washington Post

“Dora and the Lost City of Gold” () The beloved cartoon character of Dora the Explorer becomes a winning 21st century heroine in this perky action-adventure flick that injects a healthy dose of irony into the format. Dora (Isabella Moner) has been sent to an American high school, but she and three classmates are kidnapped by a group of bounty hunters hoping to swoop in on a treasure her professor parents may have discovered. 102 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Farewell” () We recognize aspects of our own clan within the complicated, maddening, loving Chinese family (including Awkwafina as a 30-something raised in America) that gathers to celebrate the family matriarch but refuses to tell her she’s dying. This is a viewing experience to be treasured. It is one of the very best films of 2019. 98 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw” () Former U.S. federal agent Luke Hobbs (Dwaine Johnson) and former mercenary/criminal Deckard Shaw (Jason Statham), are recruited by the government to track down a tiny, world-ending thingamabob. It is also wrestled over by a comely MI6 agent, Hattie Shaw (Vanessa Kirby), Deckard’s sister, and a tech-enhanced super soldier, Brixton Lore (Idris Elba). This film also screens in IMAX. 135 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Good Boys” () This raucous tweenage comedy is a joke-dense and highly original coming-of-age tale that’s sweet and sour in all the best ways. Over the course of a single day, best friends and middle-schoolers Max (Jacob Tremblay), Thor (Brady Noon) and Lucas (Keith L. Williams) experience an odyssey through mean girls, frat houses, sex toys, tired cops and six-lane freeways. 89 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Kitchen” () Strong work by Melissa McCarthy, Tiffany Haddish and Elisabeth Moss as mob wives who take over the collection racket when their husbands go to prison. But the story favors instant plot developments, quick-shock moments and gruesome violence until it becomes downright impossible to empathize with these women. 102 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“The Lion King” () Jon Favreau’s live-action/CGI remake of the Disney animated classic “The Lion King” is a solid and at times stunningly beautiful film with breathtaking attention to detail. The insanely talented duo of Donald Glover and Beyonce are great as Simba and Nala, Billy Eichner and Seth Rogen kill as Timon and Pumbaa, and the CGI version of Scar (Chiwetel Ejiofor) is a work of art. This “Lion King” rules. And roars. 118 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” () In a movie filled with sparkling acting, Brad Pitt dominates as the best friend and former stunt double of a fading TV star (Leonardo DiCaprio). Quentin Tarantino’s deeply personal, darkly funny period piece, set in 1969, brilliantly and sometimes outrageously mashes up real-life events and characters with pure fiction. This film also screens in IMAX. 159 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Rocketman” () A therapy session serves as a framing device for Elton John’s (Taron Egerton) life story that we revisit throughout the film. The film frequently explodes into song-and-dance fantasy, expressing the emotional twists, turns and turmoil of each moment in John’s remarkable life. 121 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark” () This movie’s good even when it goes in too many directions at once, because it gets the kids right. A handwritten book of horror stories is discovered in 1968 by high school student Stella (Zoe Colletti) and her friends in an abandoned mansion on Halloween. They take turns living out what’s being written, before their eyes, in blood-red ink. 111 minutes. (PG-13)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“The Secret Life of Pets 2” () In this sequel to the 2016 animated hit, sweet pup Max (voiced by Patton Oswalt), is developing a nervous, overprotective itch about his owner’s toddler son. Meanwhile, Max’s pals in the city tangle with some gnarly cats, while bunny Snowball (Kevin Hart) and newcomer Daisy (Tiffany Haddish) rescue a tiger cub. 86 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Spider-Man: Far From Home” () Tom Holland, the best movie Spider-Man of the bunch, stars in this refreshing, down-to-earth chapter in the Avengers saga. It’s a zesty, not overly dark slice of entertainment, bursting with pyrotechnics, sharp humor and just enough life-and-death ingredients to keep you interested throughout. 135 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Toy Story 4” () Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) and friends return in this worthy addition to the “Toy Story” library, bringing back some of the most beloved characters in the history of animated film and introducing us to a fantastically entertaining new bunch of toys. 100 minutes. (G)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Where’d You Go, Bernadette” () In this Richard Linklater adaptation of the Maria Semple novel, 15-year-old Bee Branch’s (Emma Nelson) socially phobic mother Bernadette (Cate Blanchett) has disappeared. Bee pieces together the paper trail that leads to Bernadette’s life-changing whereabouts. But the movie feels a little off from the beginning. It’s a morose sort of screwball comedy with heart. 104 minutes. (PG-13)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“Yesterday” () In this high-concept magical dramedy, a weird solar flare wipes our collective consciousness of all traces of The Beatles. Struggling musician Jack (Himesh Patel) is the only person who remembers the band, and he ultimately decides to capitalize on it. Even if this modern fairy tale doesn’t hold up on close inspection, the ride is enjoyable. 116 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

23883459