Heads Up

“Between Me and My Mind” — A new documentary about Phish frontman Trey Anastasio. Driven by a constant need to create, Anastasio takes on new projects, including some of his most personal music to date and Phish’s ambitious New Year’s Eve show at Madison Square Garden. This film screens at 6 and 9:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Tin Pan Theater in Bend and 7 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Tin Pan tickets cost $10 plus fees (advance tickets available at bendfilm.org.) Regal tickets cost $15, plus fees. 100 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from BendFilm

“Deconstructing The Beatles’ Revolver” — Composer/producer Scott Freiman walks Beatles fans through the groundbreaking production techniques that went into creating the 1966 album “Revolver.” It featured the songs “Eleanor Rigby,” “Yellow Submarine,” and “Tomorrow Never Knows,” and coincided with the Beatles’ decision to stop performing live. Presented by BendFilm and Cascade School of Music. This film screens at 2 and 8 p.m. Monday at Tin Pan Theater in Bend. Doors open 30 minutes prior to each screening and space is limited. Cost is $7. 90 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Easy Rider” 50th Anniversary — Experience the real, uncensored ‘60s counterculture in this compelling mixture of drugs, sex and armchair politics. An alcoholic attorney (Jack Nicholson) hooks up with two part-time, drug-dealing bikers (Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper) heading from California to New Orleans in a stoned-out quest for life’s true meaning. Includes a special introduction. This film screens at 4 p.m. Sunday and 4 and 7 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 100 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Marjoe” — This 1972 film is part documentary, part expose. It follows one-time child evangelist Marjoe Gortner on the church tent Revivalist circuit, commenting on the showmanship of Evangelism and “the religion business,” prior to the start of televangelism. Free popcorn is provided and a discussion will follow the film. This film screens at 6 p.m. Sunday at St. Helens Hall, Trinity Episcopal Church in Bend. Free. 88 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

The Metropolitan Opera Live Summer Encore: “Aida” — Soprano Anna Netrebko and mezzo-soprano Anita Rachvelishvili star in Verdi’s grand drama set in ancient Egypt. Performed in Italian with English subtitles. This event screens at 1 and 7 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 236 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Rogue One” — In this 2016 entry to the “Star Wars” franchise, the daughter of an Imperial scientist joins the Rebel Alliance in a risky move to steal the Death Star plans. Presented by Deschutes Public Library’s A Universe of Stories summer reading program. This film screens at 11 a.m. Tuesday at the Tower Theatre in Bend. Free. 133 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“The Secret Life of Pets” — A special discounted screening of 2016 animated film about a terrier named Max (Louis C.K.) whose life is upended when his owner takes in Duke (Eric Stonestreet), a stray whom Max instantly dislikes. This film screens at 10 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $1. 87 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Smallfoot” — A special discounted screening of the 2018 animated adventure about a Yeti (Channing Tatum) who is convinced the mythical creatures known as “humans” really do exist. This film screens at 10 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $1. 96 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Sound! Euphonium: The Movie — Our Promise: A Brand New Day — This continuation of the “Sound! Euphonium” anime series explores Kumiko Oumae’s second year of high school as she mentors new members of the concert band. Includes a recap of previous seasons. This film screens at 7 p.m. Thursday in Japanese with English subtitles at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 110 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Where the Trail Ends” — This 2012 film follows top free ride mountain bikers Darren Berrecloth, James Doerfling, Andreu Lacondeguy, Kurt Sorge and Cam Zink as they search for untraveled terrain around the globe, shaping the future of big mountain free riding. This film screens outdoors at 8 p.m. Friday at LOGE Entrada in Bend. In the event of rain, the screening will be moved to the cafe. Free. 81 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

WHAT’S NEW

“American Woman” () Sienna Miller delivers a subtly evolving portrait of Deb, a woman who finds herself, over the course of several years. It is a movingly rendered story, made watchable by an actress whose elastic performance bookends the film with two very different people. The arc of Deb’s maternal transformation — in which she steps into the role of mother that she once resisted becoming — is the armature on which “American Woman” hangs. 111 minutes. (R)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“Crawl” (star rating unavailable) When a massive hurricane hits her Florida hometown, Haley (Kaya Scodelario) ignores evacuation orders to search for her missing father (Barry Pepper). Finding him gravely injured in the crawl space of their family home, the two become trapped by quickly encroaching floodwaters. As time runs out to escape the strengthening storm, Haley and her father discover that the rising water level is the least of their fears. 87 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“The Last Black Man in San Francisco” () Beautiful and melancholy and almost musical in its language, this film centers on Jimmie (Jimmie Fails), a San Francisco man obsessed with reclaiming the house built by his grandfather some 70 years ago, and his friend Montgomery (Jonathan Majors), an aspiring playwright. Theirs is one of the most authentic and touching and powerful relationships of any kind in any film this year. 121 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Stuber” () In a plot that plays like the sophomoric-stunt version of Michael Mann’s classic L.A. noir “Collateral,” mild-mannered Uber driver Stu (Kumail Nanjiani) and Los Angeles police detective Vic (Dave Bautista) wind up on a dreary crook’s tour through the city, punctuated by moments of sharing, caring, slapstick comedy and sadistic gunplay. Even Nanjiani’s endearingly funny turn isn’t enough to elevate “Stuber” above its own trite, lazy aspirations. 93 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

STILL SHOWING

“Aladdin” () Disney nails it with the live-action update from co-written and directed by Guy Ritchie. Canadian actor Mena Massoud is perfect in the role of Aladdin, Naomi Scott as Jasmine, tears into a beefed-up role with gusto and Will Smith adds some hip-hop flair to the Genie. 128 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“All Is True” () A warm and moving speculation on Shakespeare’s final years. Sreenwriter Ben Elton sends Shakespeare (Kenneth Branagh) home to an uneasy retirement, where he is met by long-neglected wife Anne (Judi Dench) and grown daughters. There’s plenty to argue about here,” but that’s another story. This one goes its own way, and the performances are excellent. 101 minutes. (PG-13)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“Annabelle Comes Home” () In the seventh “Conjuring” installment and the third in the stand-alone trilogy about a malevolent doll, demonologists Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga), relocate the doll Annabelle to their “artifact room,” but their babysitter’s friend accidentally unleashes it. 106 minutes. (R)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“Avengers: Endgame” () Amid all the soaring and the blasting, this superhero adventure for the ages is a genuinely moving drama involving characters we’ve come to know and love. It’s a serious contender to be the best of the Marvel series and the undisputed champion when it comes to emotional punch. 182 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“The Biggest Little Farm” () This documentary chronicles the exploits of Molly and John Chester, a Los Angeles-based chef and cinematographer, respectively, who decided to buy 200 acres of barren land and establish a modern-day Eden of organic, sustainable food production. 91 minutes. (PG)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Booksmart” () The absolutely winning Kaitlyn Dever and Beanie Feldstein have terrific best-buddy chemistry as studious teens who cut loose during a night of partying just before graduation. Actress Olivia Wilde makes an impressive feature directing debut with this refreshingly original take on the familiar coming-of-age movie. 102 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Child’s Play () The original scary doll, Chucky (chillingly voiced by Mark Hamill) returns to the big screen in this brutally violent reset. But “Child’s Play” has more political commentary than scares and doesn’t hang together as a movie. It’s just an extended riff about the dangers of artificial intelligence. 90 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Dark Phoenix” () In this middling chapter of the “X-Men” series, the telekinetic Jean Grey (Sophie Turner) absorbs a mass of energy that makes her far stronger than ever before, but unable to control the force inside her. The movie doesn’t come close to carrying the emotional impact of so many Marvel Universe films. 115 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“The Dead Don’t Die” () The dead are rising from their graves in Jim Jarmusch’s meta-zombie horror comedy, starring Bill Murray, Adam Driver, Tilda Swinton and other luminaries. Some of the sight gags and quips are gold; others are just filler, but still kind of interesting in a wacky sort of way. 104 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Echo in the Canyon” () Jakob Dylan is your tour guide in this sunny, sepia-toned documentary, a love letter to the Laurel Canyon music scene of the mid-1960s and its folk/rock stars, including the Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, the Mamas and the Papas and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. 82 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Godzilla: King of the Monsters” () Five years after the world learned the hard way that supposedly mythic creatures are, in fact, real, everyone tries to figure out how to deal with them in a muddled and overlong sequel. As we get mired in heavy-handed lectures about how humans are the REAL monsters, it’s all so ... serious. 135 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum” () The third installment of the ultraviolent, wonderfully askew “John Wick” franchise is the most outlandish and maybe the most entertaining chapter to date. Keanu Reeves returns, giving a classic deadpan performance in an escapist movie that encourages us to groan and cringe and laugh at the mayhem. 131 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Late Night” () Mindy Kaling’s comedy about women (and women of color) in the television industry strikes swiftly and precisely. But despite its sharp script, impeccable casting and a powerhouse performance by star Emma Thompson, “Late Night” feels less like a knife to the heart of the good-old boys club and more like a playful punch to the arm. 102 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Men in Black: International” () In what could otherwise be just another bland action comedy sprinkled with sci-fi, “Men In Black: International” has a few secret weapons. Despite nagging questions about whether we really needed a new installment of this franchise, “International” makes its case with winning stars, a breakneck pace and a tone that never takes itself too seriously. 114 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Midsommar” () Set in the land of the midnight sun at a Swedish festival celebrating the summer solstice, the setting primes us to expect the unexpected. But one thing’s for certain when it comes to writer/director Ari Aster: Always expect to be disturbed, defiled and maybe delighted. You’ll never look at flower crowns the same way. 140 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Pokémon Detective Pikachu” () Boasting “Blade Runner”-style visuals and a wise-cracking Ryan Reynolds, “Detective Pikachu” is not for everyone, but it just might be for you. Smart-alecky little Pikachu (Reynolds) in a tiny Sherlock Holmes hat helps Tim (Justice Smith), learn more about his police detective dad. But the story suffers and the action sequences are chaotic. 104 minutes (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Raft” () In 1973, 11 young people agreed to be part of a social experiment in which they’ll sail the Atlantic for 101 days while a Svengali-like anthropologist studies them. Marcus Lindeen’s fascinating film is one of those “Wait, WHAT?!” documentaries that has one Googling to make sure this isn’t some elaborate put-on. It’s real. Real nuts. 97 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Rocketman” () A therapy session serves as a framing device for Elton John’s (Taron Egerton) life story that we revisit throughout the film. The film frequently explodes into song-and-dance fantasy, expressing the emotional twists, turns and turmoil of each moment in John’s remarkable life. 121 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Secret Life of Pets 2” () In this sequel to the 2016 animated hit, sweet pup Max (voiced by Patton Oswalt), is developing a nervous, overprotective itch about his owner’s toddler son. Meanwhile, Max’s pals in the city tangle with some gnarly cats, while bunny Snowball (Kevin Hart) and newcomer Daisy (Tiffany Haddish) rescue a tiger cub. 86 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Spider-Man: Far From Home” () Tom Holland, the best movie Spider-Man of the bunch, stars in this refreshing, down-to-earth chapter in the Avengers saga. It’s a zesty, not overly dark slice of entertainment, bursting with pyrotechnics, sharp humor and just enough life-and-death ingredients to keep you interested throughout. 135 minutes. This film also screens in 3D and IMAX. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Toy Story 4” () Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) and friends return in this worthy addition to the “Toy Story” library, bringing back some of the most beloved characters in the history of animated film and introducing us to a fantastically entertaining new bunch of toys. 100 minutes. (G)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Yesterday” () In this magical dramedy, a weird solar flare wipes our collective consciousness of all traces of The Beatles. Struggling musician Jack (Himesh Patel) is the only person who remembers the band and he decides to capitalize on it. Even if this modern fairy tale doesn’t hold up on close inspection, the ride is enjoyable. 116 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

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