Heads Up

BendFilm In Case You Missed It: “Satan & Adam” and “Community Patrol” — “Satan & Adam” documents the unlikely duo of harmonica player Adam Gussow and one-man-band Sterling “Mr. Satan” Magee who achieved international acclaim in the late 1980s and early 1990s, until Mr. Satan mysteriously disappeared. “Community Patrol” is a documentary short that follows a Detroit minister as he tries to rally his community to shut down a drug operation. These films screens at 5:30 p.m. Monday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. Cost is $12 plus fees in advance. Tickets at BendFilm.org. 91 minutes (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from BendFilm

“The Big Year” — In this 2011 comedy, two bird enthusiasts (Owen Wilson and Jack Black) try to defeat the cocky world record holder (Steve Martin) in a year-long bird-spotting competition. Screened as part of the Jefferson County Community Read program. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Friday at Rodriguez Annex, Jefferson County Library in Madras. Free. 100 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

Bolshoi Ballet: “Carmen Suite” and “Petrushka” — A double bill captured live the same day in Moscow. In the one-act ballet “Carmen,” a passionate and free-spirited woman finds herself caught in a love triangle. “Petrushka” is a new creation by contemporary choreographer Edward Clug. This event screens at 12:55 p.m. Sunday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $18, plus fees. 140 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Booksmart” Early Access — An unfiltered, coming of age comedy directed by Olivia Wilde about high school best friends (Kaitlyn Dever and Beanie Feldstein) and the bonds that last a lifetime. This film opens May 31 with a special advance screening at 8 p.m. Friday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.20 for adults and $9.70 for seniors and children, plus fees. 105 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

HUMP! Film Festival — A series of short, amateur films highlighting sex and relationships of all body types, abilities, sexual orientations, kinks and fetishes. These films screen at 7 and 9:15 p.m. Saturday at Volcanic Theatre Pub in Bend. Cost is $20, plus fees in advance at bit.ly/HumpFest. Running time unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from HUMP! Film Festival

KPOV Movie Night: “Cobain: Montage of Heck” — An authorized documentary about the late musician Kurt Cobain, from his early days in Aberdeen, Washington, to his success and downfall with the grunge band Nirvana. Benefits KPOV Community Radio. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Monday (doors open at 7 p.m.) at the Volcanic Theatre Pub in Bend. Cost is $10 plus fees in advance at bit.ly/KPOV-Cobain or $12 at the door. 145 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind” 35th Anniversary —In this animated film directed by Hayao Miyazaki, warring human factions survive in a world devastated by atmospheric poisons and swarming with gigantic insects. The Valley of the Wind is led by the courageous Princess Nausicaä, whose love of all living things leads her into terrible danger. This film screens at 7 p.m. Tuesday (dubbed in English) and Wednesday (in Japanese with English subtitles) at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 120 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Rocketman” Fandango Early Access — An epic musical fantasy about musician Elton John’s (Taron Egerton) breakthrough years. This film opens May 24 with an early screening for Fandango members at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.20 for adults and $9.70 for seniors and children, plus fees. 121 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Saga of Tanya the Evil: The Movie” — In this futuristic anime film, the victorious Imperial Army’s 203rd Air Mage Battalion led by Major Tanya Degurechaff are dispatched to the Empire-Federation border. There, young Warrant Officer Mary Sue has taken up arms with the volunteer Commonwealth army, hoping to bring her father’s killers to justice. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in Japanese with English subtitles at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 115 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Steel Magnolias” 30th Anniversary — Six screen icons — Sally Field, Dolly Parton, Shirley MacLaine, Daryl Hannah, Olympia Dukakis and Julia Roberts — come together in this hilarious and heartwarming story of life, love and loss in a small Louisiana parish. This film screens at 4 and 7 p.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 125 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Wonderful Losers: A Different World” — They’re called water carriers, domestics, ‘gregarios’ and ‘Sancho Panzas,’ always at the back of the group in professional cycling, with no right for a personal victory. These wonderful losers, filmed over several seasons of the Giro d’Italia bike race, are the true warriors of the sport. This film screens at 8 p.m. Thursday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. Cost is $6, cash only. 71 minutes (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

WHAT’S NEW

“The Chaperone” () Nearly every time the prim and proper Norma (Elizabeth McGovern) takes center stage in this 1920s drama from the “Downton Abbey” team, we’re wondering what’s happening with the teenager she’s supposed to be escorting, the wildly talented and also more than a little wild Louise Brooks. 108 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“A Dog’s Journey” () The third film in a trilogy adapted from W. Bruce Cameron’s novels has the emotional bite to match its somewhat hokey bark. The theory that the same dog spirit has been reincarnated into different canine forms over its owner’s lifetime is a fantasy dog lovers want to believe. This dog’s journey isn’t all romps in the tall grass and stories of puppy heroism — it’s about family trauma, death, addiction and life-threatening illness. It’s about how dogs can fill the hole in your heart that a person might leave. 108 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum” () The third installment of the ultra violent, wonderfully askew “John Wick” franchise is the most outlandish and maybe the most entertaining chapter to date. Keanu Reeves returns, giving a classic deadpan performance in an escapist movie that encourages us to groan and cringe and laugh at the mayhem. 131 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“The Sun is Also a Star” () This feature adaptation of Nicola Yoon’s second novel is a melodramatic teen romance. We meet New Yorker Natasha (Yara Shadidi), the day before she and her immigrant family are set to be deported. She’s spotted in Grand Central Station by Daniel (Charles Melton). “Give me a day,” he says, “and you’ll fall in love with me.” Unfortunately, the dialogue just grinds things to a halt. That’s somewhat covered up by director Ry Russo-Young’s artful filmmaking. 100 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Wild Nights With Emily” () When we first meet Emily Dickenson (Molly Shannon) in this biopic, she shares a passionate kiss with her brother’s wife, Susan Gilbert Dickinson (Susan Ziegler). The scene is played more for laughs than erotic tension. Such physical comedy is at odds with other scenes in which the character is taken much more seriously: as a gay writer whose goal of publication was frustrated by men. The cheeky energy of “Wild Nights” is welcome, but it goes too far at times. 84 minutes. (PG-13)

— Pat Padua, The Washington Post

STILL SHOWING

Amazing Grace () In 1972 in a Baptist church in Los Angeles, Aretha Franklin revisited her gospel roots and the resulting two-disk LP remains the biggest-selling live gospel album of all time. What many didn’t realize is that those concerts were also filmed and the movie about those storied performances has finally been released. You don’t need to be a churchgoer to find “Amazing Grace” a soul-stirring, foot-stomping, hand-raising experience. 87 minutes. (G)

— Jon Bream, Star Tribune

Ask Dr. Ruth () Filmmaker Ryan White’s documentary is a winning profile of Dr. Ruth Westheimer, the 90-year old author, sex therapist and media personality. A lonely childhood (she last saw her parents, who died in the Holocaust, when she was 10 years old) seems to have inspired Dr. Ruth’s intense longing for intimacy. As “Ask Dr. Ruth” suggests, such alienation may have led to her lifelong passion for helping others. 100 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Pat Padua, The Washington Post

“Avengers: Endgame” () Amid all the soaring and the blasting, this superhero adventure for the ages is a genuinely moving drama involving characters we’ve come to know and love. It’s a serious contender to be the best of the Marvel series and the undisputed champion when it comes to emotional punch. This film also screens in 3D, IMAX and IMAX 3D.182 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Breakthrough” () Based on a true story, this faith-based film is formulaic, but also one of the more authentically moving entries in the genre. While playing with some friends on a frozen lake, the ice breaks and teenager John Smith (Marcel Ruiz) is submerged for 15 minutes. For 45 minutes he has no pulse, until his mother Joyce (Chrissy Metz) begins to pray over his unresponsive body in the ER. 90 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

"Captain Marvel" () In this pleasing, if predictable, excursion Vers (Brie Larson), is a member of an extraterrestrial race of warriors known as the Kree. She is fighting the lizardy green Skrull aliens when she crashes on Earth in the mid-’90s. She makes an unlikely ally in Special Agent Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) and discovers through her hazy memories that she is Carol Danvers, a hot shot Air Force pilot who disappeared six years ago. 124 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Curse of La Llorona” () A hissing, pasty-faced zombie-ghost targets the children of a social worker (Linda Cardellini) in the latest addition to the Conjuring Universe. But any hopes of a creepy horror gem are dashed by the overacting, clumsy plot machinations and cliche-riddled “Gotcha!” moments. 93 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Dumbo” () This film fulfills the remake checklist Disney requires: a young heroine interested in science, a dead mother, a father scarred by war. It inexplicably warps an archaic story premise into politically correct revisionist history with a relevant message, suggesting that in the exploitative, bullying world of 1920s circuses, wildlife conservation was also a concern. 112 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Hail Satan?” () In this lively, funny and discomfiting documentary, director Penny Lane follows a group of self-identified Satan-worshipers to interrogate their beliefs and practices. What she finds is surprising and much deeper and more important than the surface of goth makeupand unsettling rituals initially suggests. It serves as a reminder of why we embrace nonconformity, pluralism and tolerance. 95 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

"How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World" () The third film in this animated franchise is as emotionally moving as it is beautifully made. Hiccup (Jay Baruchel) is now the Viking chief of his homeland, Berk, where humans and dragons live in harmony. But that idyll is threatened by dragon hunter Grimmel (F. Murray Abraham), who has his sights set on the last Night Fury dragon, Toothless. 104 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

The Hustle () This gender-swapped remake of the 1988 caper “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” has an impeccable sense of timing. The poised and proper Josephine (Anne Hathaway) and the unrefined and bawdy Penny (Wilson) are rival con artists. But the film, which preaches the power of women over the men who might underestimate them, is ultimately a bit of an 11th hour bait-and-switch, message-wise. 93 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Intruder” () A young couple (Michael Ealy and Meagan Good) buy a palatial dream home in Napa Valley, but the former owner (Dennis Quaid) just can’t seem to say goodbye. Swap the H in HGTV for “horror” and you’ve got “The Intruder.” With a cheeky sense of fun this is the kind of schlocky yet satisfying genre filmmaking that makes you jump and laugh at the same time. 102 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Little Woods” (star rating unavailable) Ollie (Tessa Thompson), short for Oleander, is a daughter in mourning for a mother who recently died after a brutal illness. Ollie is clinging to a past — and a caretaker identity — that threatens to become a prison as she strives to set her life right. Thompson emotionally expands “Little Woods,” turning a small movie into something more than its textured parts. 105 minutes. (R)

— Manohla Dargis, New York Times

“Long Shot” () This film puts the rom into the com of Washington, D.C., political machinations. It follows alt weekly journalist, Fred Flarsky (Seth Rogen), who reconnects with his middle school babysitter, Charlotte Field (Charlize Theron), who has become the youngest secretary of state ever. The incisive cultural and political commentary cuts deep and Theron and Rogen turn out to be a winning pair. 125 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Mustang” () A solid if dramatically predictable work, part prison picture, part horse story. The film’s impressive as far is it goes, but it’s exceedingly tidy in its beat-by-beat developments and the supporting character roster struggles to make an impression. 96 minutes. (R)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

Pokémon Detective Pikachu () Boasting “Blade Runner”-style visuals and a wise-cracking Ryan Reynolds, “Detective Pikachu” is not for everyone, but it just might be for you. Smart-alecky little Pikachu (Reynolds) in a tiny Sherlock Holmes hat sounds like Deadpool as he helps Tim (Justice Smith), learn more about his police detective dad who died in a fiery car crash. But the story suffers and the action sequences are chaotic. This film also screens in 3D. 104 minutes (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

Poms () This film about cheerleading in an old folks home lacks the acidic wittiness that made the 2000 comedy “Bring It On” such a winner. Diane Keaton stars as Martha, a woman in her 70s who moves to a Georgia senior living community where she convinces a few other women to join her in a cheerleading club. But the story rings hollow except in its forthright and funny treatment of death. 91 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Shazam!” () In this playful and sharply self-aware film, the alter-ego of brawny superhero Shazam (Zachary Levi) is a cynical 14-year-old foster kid, Billy Batson (Asher Angel). 132 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Tolkien” () This literary coming-of-age story is also about “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings” author J.R.R. Tolkien’s relationship to three other young men. The movie is a capable and attractive enough biopic, if also less than riveting cinema. It jumps back and forth between World War I France and the aspiring author’s school days. 111 minutes. (PG-13)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“UglyDolls” () For a film about outlandishly kooky dolls, this film is flat, listless and narratively bland. UglyDoll Moxy (Kelly Clarkson) leads a group of ugly pals to the land of Perfection where she learns to embrace herself and help others understand that their “flaws” make them special. 87 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Us” () A ’70s-inspired horror flick from “Get Out” director Jordan Peele that crawls with genuinely creepy tension, lightened with dashes of well-earned humor. “Us” is a classic home invasion thriller that also traffics in dangerous doppelgangers, body doubles and twins. 116 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

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