Heads Up

“American Folk” — KPOV community radio presents the 2017 film about the kindness of strangers and the power of music. Two folk musicians stranded in California (Joe Purdy and Amber Rubarth), take a road trip to New York in the days after 9/11. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Monday (doors open at 7 p.m.) at Volcanic Theatre Pub in Bend. Cost is $10 plus fees in advance at bendticket.com or $12 at the door. 99 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

Best Picture Film Festival — Enjoy seven of the 2019 Academy Award nominees for best picture: “Black Panther,” “BlacKkKlansman,” “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “The Favourite,” “Green Book,” “A Star is Born” and “Vice.” These films screen at various times and dates through Feb. 24. Cost is $35 for a festival pass with access to all best picture screenings or $9.70 to $12.20 for individual screenings. Running times and MPAA ratings vary.

— Synopsis from Regal Cinemas

“Blood Road” — The mysteries surrounding her father’s death in the Vietnam War lead ultra-endurance mountain biker Rebecca Rusch on an emotional journey as she pedals 1,200 miles of the Ho Chi Minh trail through Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. Benefits the Central Oregon Trail Alliance. This film screens at 8 p.m. Thursday (doors open at 7:15 p.m.) at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. Cost is $6 at the door (cash only). 96 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Jimi Hendrix: Electric Church” — This documentary includes footage of the legendary guitarist at his July 4, 1970 concert at the Atlanta Pop Festival. It also traces his journey to the festival amid the shadow of civil rights unrest and a burgeoning festival culture. This film screens at 7:15 p.m. Tuesday at Sisters Movie House. Cost is $10.25. 89 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Sisters Movie House

Mountainfilm on Tour — The 16th annual screening of Mountainfilm benefits The Environmental Center and offers adventure-packed documentary short films curated from the Mountainfilm festival in Telluride, Colorado. This event screens at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the Tower Theatre in Bend, with a different program of films each evening. Cost is $22 in advance, $25 the day of the show or $40 for both nights (plus fees). Running times unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from the Tower Theatre

“A Plastic Ocean” — In this award-winning documentary, journalist Craig Leeson, free diver Tanya Streeter and an international team of scientists and researchers travel around the world over four years to explore the fragile state of our oceans. They uncover alarming truths about plastic pollution and reveal working solutions that can be put into immediate effect. This film screens at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Trinity Episcopal Church in Bend. $5 suggested donation at the door, children and students free with ID. 102 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

Unity Film Festival: #Education is Not a Crime — “Education Under Fire” a documentary about a distance learning agency formed in Iran for Baha’i students denied university admission, will screen at 2:30 p.m., and the documentary “Changing the World, One Wall at a Time,” about the world’s largest street art campaigns, will screen at 3:15 p.m. Sunday at the East Bend Public Library. Free. Running times unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Bend Baha’is

WHAT’S NEW

“Arctic” () In this gripping, taciturn and wintry film, Overgård (Mads Mikkelsen), has survived a plane crash in a punishing polar landscape. But when the rescue helicopter goes down, he decides to hike to a seasonal way-station, in the hopes of saving himself and the badly injured female co-pilot (Maria Thelma Smáradóttir). It’s a shame the script relies on the tired trope of the vulnerable, wordless female character as merely motivation for male action. It’s the one flaw of this otherwise meticulous portrait of survival and human determination. 97 minutes. (PG-`13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Capernaum” () This Lebanese film with a cast of non-professional actors made the Oscar shortlist for best foreign film. As the movie opens, a resourceful 12-year-old named Zain (Zain Al Rafeea) is suing his parents. Flashbacks reveal how Zain suspects his parents plan to sell his younger sister into prostitution and this bleak drama follows its leading character on an increasingly desperate journey. We know Zain will survive to make it into the courtroom, but what will he lose along the way? Screens in Arabic with subtitles. 121 minutes. (R)

— Chris Hewitt, Minneapolis Star Tribune

“Fighting With My Family” () This sports biopic is an underdog fable based on the true story of a scrappy Norwich, England, wrestling clan. The superb Florence Pugh portrays the World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc., star known as Paige. Out of the ring, she’s Saraya-Jade Bevis — a tough, continually underestimated striver. Nick Frost and Lena Headey play the heads of this wrestling clan and Jack Lowden captures the essence of thwarted ambition as Saraya’s brother Zak. These people are neither angels or thugs. They’re entertainers and entrepreneurs. And they’re lively company. 108 minutes. (PG-13)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” () The third film in this animated franchise is as emotionally moving as it is beautifully made. Hiccup (Jay Baruchel) is now the Viking chief of his homeland, Berk, where humans and dragons live in harmony. But that idyll is threatened by dragon hunter Grimmel (F. Murray Abraham), who has his sights set on the last Night Fury dragon, Toothless. Through all of the raids and kidnappings and hoopla, “The Hidden World” brings it home with a enormously moving message about learning to stand — and fly — on your own, and the healing power of friendship. This film also screens in 3D. 104 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Run the Race” (star rating unavailable) Reeling from his mother’s death and his father’s abandonment, Zach Truett (Tanner Stine), an All-State athlete, finds glory on the football field, working to earn a college scholarship and a ticket out of town for himself and his brother David (Evan Hofer). When a devastating injury puts Zach and his dreams on the sidelines, David laces up his track cleats to salvage their future and point Zach toward hope. 101 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

STILL SHOWING

2019 Oscar Nominated Short Films — Animation (star rating unavailable) A screening of each 2019 Academy Award nominee in this category: “Animal Behavior,” “Bao,” “Late Afternoon,” “One Small Step” and “Weekends.” 60 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from ShortsTV

2019 Oscar Nominated Short Films — Documentary (star rating unavailable) A screening of each 2019 Academy Award nominee in this category: “A Night at the Garden,” “Black Sheep,” “End Game,” “Lifeboat” and “Period. End of Sentence.” 111 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from ShortsTV

2019 Oscar Nominated Short Films — Live Action (star rating unavailable) A screening of each 2019 Academy Award nominee in this category: “Detainment,” “Fauve,” “Marguerite,” “Madre (Mother)” and “Skin.” 109 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from ShortsTV

“Alita: Battle Angel” () Rescued cyborg Alita (Rosa Salazar) is a blank slate and experiences everything in post-apocalyptic Iron City with a childlike wonder. She also possesses unique fighting skills, which she puts to use defending her loved ones. Director, Robert Rodriguez brings a go-for-broke sense of world-building, but the film is failed by the weak script, tonal inconsistencies and poorly written characters. This film also screens in IMAX 3D. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Aquaman” () DC Comics superhero Aquaman takes center stage and Jason Momoa’s great in close-up, surly and charismatic. But watching this movie is like getting trapped in a Wisconsin Dells waterpark, over a long weekend. Without a bartender in sight. This film is weighed down by klutzy screenwriting, horror-inspired jump sares and protracted, numbing brutality. 143 minutes (PG-13)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“BlacKkKlansman” () Director-co-writer Spike Lee recounts the story of a 1970s police officer (John David Washington, in an immensely entertaining and powerful performance) who went undercover with the Ku Klux Klan, despite being black. Searing, electric and sometimes flat-out funny, it’s one of the best films of 2018. 135 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Black Panther” () Even if you’re not normally into the superhero genre, if you appreciate finely honed storytelling, winning performances and tons of whiz-bang action sequences and good humor, then you should see “Black Panther.” It’s one of the best times I’ve had at the movies this decade. 140 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Bohemian Rhapsody” () In this Queen biopic, Rami Malek as frontman Freddie Mercury, channels the dueling relationship between Mercury’s confidence and his insecurity. The rather uneven film is aided by a parade of legendary Queen hit singles. But it’s hard to shake the feeling there’s a far more interesting film about Mercury yet to be made. 134 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Cold Pursuit” () Liam Neeson stars in what might look like another Liam Neesom thriller, but as the bodies pile up, it quickly becomes evident that this bat-bleep crazy story of a father seeking vengeance is an action comedy, with the emphasis on the comedy. 118 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Cold War” () This gorgeously fatalistic love story begins in Communist Poland and spans 15 years and several countries across postwar Europe. The movie is fueled by the easy, charismatic chemistry of its stars: Tomasz Kot and especially Joanna Kulig. The exiles belong together and yet they’re impossible together. “Cold War” believes in their beautiful disaster of a love story to the end. 88 minutes. (R)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“The Favourite“ () During the 18th-century reign of Queen Anne (Olivia Colman), her longtime friend (Rachel Weisz) and a new servant (Emma Stone) vie for the monarch’s affections. The three stars bring out the best in each other in a bawdy, darkly funny, sharp-edged, foul-mouthed comedy of very BAD manners. 121 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Free Solo” () This often breathtaking real-life man-against-nature adventure is a spectacular, unnervingly immediate portrait of a climber attempting a death-defying ascent. The filmmakers follow champion free climber Alex Honnold as he sets out to be the first person ever to solo climb El Capitan. 100 minutes. (PG-13)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Glass” () The third installment in writer/director M. Night Shyamalan’s “Unbreakable” trilogy is both overwrought and undercooked. After the 15th twist ending, you just want to throw up your hands and yell, “We get it!” There’s a dank, dark air that weighs “Glass” down and it’s only the moments featuring James McAvoy as his “Split” character, Kevin Wendell Crumb (and Kevin’s many alter egos), where it achieves liftoff. 129 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Green Book” () Viggo Mortensen plays a thick-headed lunk from the Bronx and Mahershala Ali is the musician he’s driving through the South in 1962, and both are nothing but believable. This is a friendship story and one of the best times I’ve had at the movies this year. 130 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Happy Death Day 2U” () There’s a surprisingly sweet heart lurking beneath all the bloody rinse-and-repeat hijinks in this cheerfully twisted sequel, following up on the college student (Jessica Rothe) who relives her murder over and over. 100 minutes. (PG-13)

— Pat Padua, The Washington Post

“Isn’t It Romantic” () A visually and verbally ingenious sendup of romantic comedies. Natalie (Rebel Wilson), an entry-level architect at a New York firm where everyone takes advantage of her, wakes up after a mugging in an alternate universe and suddenly, she’s the star of her own rom-com. But rather than take delight in this new world, she feels instantly trapped. The movie gives its audience credit as it dissects the cliches of the genre with a deft satiric touch. 88 minutes. (PG-13)

— Jane Horwitz, The Washington Post

“The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part” () A candy-colored sugar rush with a nonstop parade of pop culture references, famous cameos and inside jokes, “The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part” doesn’t quite match the original’s spark and creativity, but it’s a worthy chapter in the ever-expanding Lego movie universe. 93 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Mary Poppins Returns” () While it would be all but impossible to match one of the most beloved and acclaimed musicals of all time, “Mary Poppins Returns” is a sequel worthy of the name. Emily Blunt is sensational, along with a stellar supporting cast including Lin-Manuel Miranda, in this wall-to-wall smile of a movie: big of heart and large in scale, brimming with show-stopping musical numbers. 130 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“The Mule” () This offensive debacle is adapted by screenwriter Nick Schenk from a New York Times Magazine article, “The Sinaloa Cartel’s 90-year Old Drug Mule” by Sam Dolnick. The film is a fairly straightforward adaptation of the true story, but the racist cultural stereotypes and truly appalling treatment of women is all thanks to Schenk and the film’s star, Clint Eastwood. 116 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Prodigy” () Creepy children are a mainstay of the horror genre. This chilling new horror film continues that fine tradition, with one intriguing complication: the young villain is a metaphor for parental failure. When 8-year-old Miles (Jackson Robert Scott) suddenly beats a classmate with a monkey wrench, his alarmed mother, Sarah (Taylor Schilling) suspects that another, more disturbed consciousness may inhabit Miles’s body. 100 minutes. (R)

— Alan Zilberman, The Washington Post

“Ralph Breaks the Internet” () The hapless video game “villain” (John C. Reilly) from “Wreck-It Ralph” and his sharp-witted friend Vanellope (Sarah Silverman) venture out of the arcade into the World Wide Web in search of a replacement part. There were times when the sweet-natured animated adventure was brimming with so much stimuli, I had to remind myself to laugh. 112 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse () The best “Spider-Man” movie yet, and one of the best 2018 films of any kind, is peppered with clever visual touches and crackling good inside jokes. The story about a new Spidey meeting versions of the character in alternate universes is a brilliant, exuberant, soaring and original adventure. 117 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“A Star is Born” () In his directorial debut, Bradley Cooper (also the leading man) strikes the perfect balance between a showbiz fable and an intimate story with universal truths. As the protege who rockets to fame, Lady Gaga is a winning, natural presence, even in the scenes where she’s nowhere near a piano or a microphone. 136 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“They Shall Not Grow Old” () A remarkable new documentary from director Peter Jackson that uses restored footage and oral histories recorded by British veterans to tell the story of the men who fought in World War I . Jackson took this often grainy, black-and-white silent footage from hand-cranked cameras and sharpened it, colorized it, added sound and more. It’s an unexpectedly contemporary-feeling experience and a portrait of humanity and inhumanity. 99 minutes. (R)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“The Upside” () Parolee Dell (Kevin Hart) stumbles into a job as the “life auxiliary” to an uber-wealthy quadriplegic man (Bryan Cranston). Their chemistry is easy, unlike the forced bits and riffs, weak writing and shaky character transitions that bedevil the rest of the film. It’s a struggle to find the bright side to this rather hackneyed film. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Vice” () Christian Bale inhabits former Vice President Dick Cheney down to his distinctive, sideways grimace and wheezily stentorian inhalations. But strip away the gimmicks and what may seem exhilaratingly brash begins to look glib and relatively tame. Structurally, “Vice” is a mess, leaving few penetrating or genuinely illuminating ideas to ponder. 132 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“What Men Want” () With impeccable comedic timing, Taraji P. Henson is the primary reason why this cheerfully bawdy remake of the Mel Gibson hit “What Women Want” is consistently funny and entertaining. 117 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

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