Heads Up

“Batman: Mask of the Phantasm” 25th Anniversary — In this animated film, Batman battles a dangerous new foe who is trying to frame the Dark Knight for the murder of a crime lord — and who is mysteriously linked to Bruce Wayne’s former girlfriend. Also includes a Looney Tunes short, “Rabid Rider.” This film screens at 2 and 7 p.m. Monday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 80 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

BendFilm presents: “Babette’s Feast” — During the late 1800s, a strict religious community in a Danish village takes in a French refugee from the Franco-Prussian War as a servant to the late pastor’s daughters in this Oscar-winning 1987 drama. This film screens at 3 p.m. Tuesday (doors at 2:30 p.m.) at the Tin Pan Theater in Bend. Cost is $8, tickets at bendfilm.org. 103 minutes. (G)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

Bolshoi Ballet: “La Sylphide” — Captured live from Moscow, this romantic masterpiece tells the story of a young Scotsman awakened on his wedding day with a kiss from an ethereal winged Sylph. Entranced by her beauty, he risks everything to pursue an unattainable love. This event screens at 12:55 p.m. Sunday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $15, plus fees. 120 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Bombshell: The Hedy Lamaar Story” — A 2017 documentary about life and career of the hailed Hollywood movie star and underappreciated genius inventor, Hedy Lamarr. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Friday at Rodriguez Annex, Jefferson County Library in Madras. Free. 88 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

Cascade Snow Bike Film Fest and Trax 4 Premiere— Featuring snowbike and moto edits from various locations in the U.S. and around the world that showcase different terrain and riding styles. Also includes a raffle to benefit the Central Oregon Avalanche Association. These films screen at 8 p.m. Thursday (doors at 7 p.m.) at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. Cost is $6, cash only. Running time unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from McMenamins

“Coldplay: A Head Full of Dreams” — Charting Coldplay’s incredible journey from humble origins to superstardom, director Mat Whitecross showcases live performances and backstage footage from the A Head Full of Dreams global tour, alongside unseen archive material. This film screens at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.20 for adults and $9.70 for seniors and children, plus fees. 120 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Regal Cinemas

“Die Hard” 30th Anniversary — New York City Detective John McClane (Bruce Willis) becomes the only hope for a small group of hostages, trapped in a Los Angeles high-rise office building when it is seized by terrorists on Christmas Eve. Includes special commentary from Turner Classic Movies. This film screens at 2 and 7 p.m. Sunday and Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 140 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Elemental” —A short film created by Sage Cattabriga-Alosa about mountain biking and skiing, based on the idea that the natural elements of air, fire, water and earth can be guides to our experiences. A Q&A with the filmmaker will follow the screening. This film screens at 5 p.m. Saturday at LOGE Entrada in Bend. Running time unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from LOGE Entrada

“Encounters at the End of the World” — In this 2007 documentary, filmmaker Werner Herzog travels to the McMurdo Station in Antarctica, to capture the continent’s beauty and investigate the characters living there. This film screens at 8 p.m. Friday at LOGE Entrada in Bend. Free. 99 minutes. (G)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Everybody’s Talking About Jamie” — The hit musical inspired by a true story about Jamie New (John McCrea), a 16-year-old who lives on a council estate in Sheffield, England. He doesn’t quite fit in and is terrified about the future, but supported by his loving mother and friends, Jamie overcomes prejudice, beats the bullies and steps out of darkness into the spotlight. This film screens at 12:55 p.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 for adults and $9.70 for seniors and children, plus fees. 165 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald” Fantastic Fandom Event — Enjoy this much anticipated film from the Harry Potter franchise two days early. Newt Scamander joins forces with young Albus Dumbledore to prevent the devious Gellert Grindelwald from raising pure-blood wizards to rule over all non-magical beings. Cost is $12.20 for adults and $9.70 for seniors and children, plus fees. 134 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from Regal Cinemas

“HOJI” — A Matchstick Productions ski film starring the reclusive Eric Hjorleifson or HOJI, a hero to legions of skiers across the globe. Also features Chris Rubens, James Heim and more. This film screens at 6:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. Thursday at the Tower Theatre in Bend. Cost is $12 for adults and $10 for children in advance, or $15 on the day of the show (plus fees). Running time unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Hymn: Sarah Brightman in Concert” — Soprano Brightman was captured live for the big screen from the Festspielhaus in the Bavarian Alps, in celebratoin of her new album, “Hymn.” Staged in two acts, the performance is a hybrid of musical film, classical-crossover and a large-scale concert production. Also includes behind the scenes footage. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 110 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“In the Light of Reverence: Protecting America’s Sacred Lands” — This 2001 documentary narrated by Peter Coyote and Tantoo Cardinal, tells the story of three indigenous communities and the lands they struggle to protect: the Lakota of the Great Plains, the Hopi of the Four Corners area and the Winnemem Wintu of Northern California. This film screens at 4 p.m. Thursday at Central Oregon Community College — Boyle Education Center, Room 105 in Bend. Free. 72 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

Cirque du Soleil in Cinema: “KURIOS: A Cabinet of Curiosities” — Step into the curio cabinet of an ambitious inventor who defies the laws of time, space and dimension in order to reinvent everything around him in a spectacular combination of dance, acrobatics and theatre. This film screens at 7 p.m. at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $15, plus fees. 105 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

The Metropolitan Opera Live: “Marnie” — Composer Nico Muhly unveils his reimagining of Winston Graham’s novel about a beautiful, mysterious young woman (Isabel Leonard ) who assumes multiple identities. This film screens live at 9:55 a.m. Saturday and in encore screenings at 1 and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $24 for adults, $22 for seniors and $18 for children, plus fees. 197 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“MOTO 10: The Movie” — The final installment of the popular motocross dirt bike series featuring private practices, tree dodging trails and freestyle tricks that push the boundaries of physics. This film screens at 6:30 and 9 p.m. Friday at Volcanic Theatre Pub in Bend. Cost is $10 for adults or $5 for children (ages 4 to 10) at 6:30 p.m.; and $15 for adults or $5 for children at 9 p.m. Advance tickets at themotoco.com. Running time unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Pray for Snow: The Movie” — 10 Barrel Brewing Co. will screen a new ski and snowboard film featuring Eric Jackson, Curtis Cixzek, Ben Ferguson and more at its annual Pray for Snow party. Also includes live music and giveaways. This event is from 5 to 10 p.m. Saturday at 10 Barrel Brewing Co. East in Bend. Free. Running time unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from 10 Barrel Brewing

“Restoring Tomorrow: Recover your past. Reclaim your future.” — A documentary about a crumbling house of worship and a community’s against-all-odds determination to restore it, told through the eyes of filmmaker Aaron Wolf who finds his own faith restored as he documents the story. This film screens at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50, plus fees. 102 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

WHAT’S NEW

“Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch” () The new animated version of the beloved Dr. Seuss story stars Benedict Cumberbatch as the Grinch and is faithful to the book, particularly in the visual style. The animation is stunning and the story is padded out with a bit more backstory for Miss Cindy Lou Who (Cameron Seely) and her frazzled single mom. There are necessary additions to the story to be made, but anything that isn’t directly from Seuss’ book simply feels like underwritten fluff. This film also screens in 3-D. 90 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Girl in the Spider’s Web” () In this adaptation of the fourth book in the Millennium series, Claire Foy slips into the cyber-goth trappings of the girl with the dragon tattoo, Lisbeth Salander. She gives the character a big, beating heart underneath her black hood and creative eye makeup. Lisbeth loves women, reveres womanhood and tortures men who hurt women. It’s a shame this story sends her skittering off chasing encrypted laptops and not true bad guys. Maybe next time. 117 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Overlord” () A dark, intense and bloody take on a World War II flick. If anyone ever wished “Saving Private Ryan” were more of a B-movie splatterfest, “Overlord” is the movie for you. After a crash landing in 1944 behind enemy lines in France, a small group of American soldiers must take out a Nazi radio jammer on a tower so planes can guide American ships to victory on D-Day. But it soon becomes clear there’s far more horror going on behind the walls. 109 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Prospect” (star rating unavailable) A teenage girl and her father travel to a remote alien moon, aiming to strike it rich harvesting elusive gems hidden in the moon’s toxic forest. But there are others roving the wilderness and the job quickly devolves into a fight to survive. Forced to contend not only with the forest’s other ruthless inhabitants, but with her own father’s greed-addled judgment, the girl finds she must carve her own path to escape. 97 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“The Guilty” (star rating unavailable) A disturbing Danish psychological thriller and real-time police drama that’s provocative and emotional. Emergency services dispatcher Asger Holm (Jakob Cedergren) receives a coded call from Iben (Jessica Dinnage), who is in a car being taken somewhere against her will by her ex-husband. But whether things in this twisty story will work out the way those on the screen or in the audience expect, is the heart of this very fine film. 85 minutes. (R)

— Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times

“Tea With the Dames” (star rating unavailable) Candid, insightful and unpredictable, acting legends Dame Eileen Atkins, Dame Judi Dench, Dame Joan Plowright and Dame Maggie Smith are a treat to hang out with. All in their 80s, these women apparently get together periodically to lunch and gossip, and it was the idea of director Roger Michell to record one of these sessions and see what happened. Lives well-lived can’t be compressed into a brief documentary, but “Tea With the Dames” is hard to resist. 94 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times

STILL SHOWING

The 20th Annual Animation Show of Shows (star rating unavailable) 15 acclaimed animated shorts from around the world: “The Green Bird,” “One Small Step,” “Grands Canons,” “Barry,” “Super Girl,” “Love Me, Fear Me,” “Business Meeting,” “Flower Found!” “Bullets,” “A Table Game,” “Carlotta’s Face,” “Age of Sail,” Polaris,” “My Moon” and “Weekends.” Running time unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Bad Times at the El Royale” () This retro crime thriller hotel mystery is another exercise in genre play. Set over one night, a group of misfits (Jeff Bridges, Cynthia Erivo, Jon Hamm and Dakota Johnson) check into the deserted El Royale hotel, where all their secrets come out to play. Money, murder and mayhem ensue, and the pulpy, twisty story and swinging ‘60s style make the film feel like an episode of “Mad Men” with a Tarantino twist. 141 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Beautiful Boy” () Though showered with love and attention as he grows up, Nic (Timothee Chalamet) becomes a crystal meth addict, prone to lashing out at anyone who tries to help him, including his dutiful father (Steve Carell). We’ve seen this story many times before, but it’s the fine writing and the heartfelt performances that elevate “Beautiful Boy” to something more than just another well-made cautionary tale. 120 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Bohemian Rhapsody” () In this Queen biopic, Rami Malek as the band’s frontman Freddie Mercury, channels the dueling relationship between Mercury’s confidence and his insecurity. The rather uneven film is aided by a parade of legendary Queen hit singles and the best parts are with the band: writing and recording music, playing live shows, even the arguments. But it’s hard to shake the feeling there’s a far more interesting film about Mercury yet to be made. This film also screens in IMAX. 134 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Crazy Rich Asians” () This big Hollywood studio movie featuring an all-Asian cast is a swoon-worthy and funny romance. Rachel Chu (Constance Wu) is dating the charming and handsome Nick Young (Henry Golding), who turns out to be the scion of an über-wealthy dynasty from Singapore. You root for them to make it, despite the cultural obstacles between them. 120 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“First Man” () Ryan Gosling plays astronaut Neil Armstrong with unsmiling reticence and stoicism in director Damien Chazelle’s meticulously detailed chronicle of Armstrong’s career, during which he became the first man to walk on the moon. This film is far less interested in derring-do and camera-ready cool than in depicting the discipline, focus, stamina and superhuman nerve it took for Armstrong and his colleagues to do their jobs. 141 minutes. (PG-13)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Free Solo” () This often breathtaking real-life man-against-nature adventure is a spectacular, unnervingly immediate portrait of a climber attempting a death-defying ascent. The filmmakers follow champion free climber Alex Honnold as he sets out to be the first person ever to solo climb El Capitan, an imposing, sheer, 3,000-foot-high rock face in Yosemite National Park. 100 minutes. (PG-13)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween” () Jack Black, who anchored the first film, is barely in this follow up. Now, there’s a new group of kids who are taken in by the evil machinations of ventriloquist dummy Slappy.  Instead of raising Stine’s monsters from the page, Slappy animates every Halloween decoration in sight. But, none of the flimsy nylon monsters are scary at all. 90 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Halloween” () A fairly engrossing bit of fan service, boasting many clever touches and a few disappointing ones en route to rousing vengeance finale. Still, enough people in it are killed, gorily, in enough different ways to satisfy the target demographic. Jamie Lee Curtis revisits the role of babysitter Laurie Strode, terrorized once again by mask-wearing serial killer Michael Myers. 104 minutes. (R)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“The Happy Prince” () Writer-director-star Rupert Everett’s account of the older Oscar Wilde dislays a level of sentimentality that is nearly Dickensian. Fortunately, the maudlin moments are offset by fine performances, flashes of humor and a visual sense that’s more astute than the script. Wilde is slipping into darkness, and the transition is as lovely as it is sad and unjust. 104 minutes. (R)

— Mark Jenkins, The Washington Post

“The Hate U Give” () A teen who lives in a poor neighborhood but goes to a rich school (Amandla Stenberg) faces pressure from all sides when a police officer shoots and kills her friend. This fictional but wholly authentic slice of American life in the 2010s is filled with immediacy and urgency, but also so much heart, soul and love. 132 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“The House With a Clock in Its Walls” () In this adaptation of John Bellairs’ young adult fantasy novel set in 1955, Lewis (Owen Vaccaro) goes to live with his uncle (Jack Black) in a ticking house of wonders. He is soon receiving lessons in magic from his uncle and their neighbor (Cate Blanchett). The film unfortunately drags and the cogs never quite fit together as snugly as they should. 104 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Hunter Killer” () So many hackneyed military action film stereotypes are thrown at this Gerard Butler-starring Navy submarine thriller, it is just this side of a parody. If you aren’t taking “Hunter Killer” too seriously, the film is a hoot. The plot concerns an underwater dogfight in the Barents Sea that’s keeping World War 3 at bay, while a coup d’etat is unfolding in Russia. 121 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Indivisible” () This faith-based Iraq War film based on the true story of Army Chaplain Darren Turner (Justin Bruening), is grounded and real, and made with finesse. It balances the narrative between both the troops away at war and those family members who stay at home. These rich characters make “Indivisible” not your average war movie but the second half of the film relies on melodramatics and stereotypes. 119 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Johnny English Strikes Again” () The charming third chapter in the surprisingly durable spy-spoof franchise about an inept secret agent. Retired MI7 operative Johnny English (Rowan Atkinson), is called back into service after a cyberattack exposes the identities of every other agent in the field and immediately reverts to his signature bungling. 88 minutes. (PG)

— Pat Padua, The Washington Post

“Mid90s” () Written and directed by Jonah Hill, “Mid90s” is a slice of ’90s nostalgia that opens with the shockingly violent beating by Ian (Lucas Hedges) of his little brother, Stevie (Sunny Suljic). The film explores the violent initiations of boys into manhood against the backdrop of a laid-back LA skate shop crew. Ultimately, these cool kids are vulnerable more than anything else — they might not think so, but owning that is the coolest of all. 84 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Night School” () Kevin Hart plays Teddy, a remedial adult student forced to attend night school. Tiffany Haddish is Carrie, his supportive but shockingly violent teacher, and the two are surrounded by a group of hilariously detailed characters. The writing is inconsistent but the classmates are what makes the comedy work. “Night School” makes the grade, but just barely. 111 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Nobody’s Fool” () This is a passable dash-through of a romantic comedy from Tyler Perry, but the actors are working harder than they should because the material needs help. Danica (Tika Sumpter), a hotshot advertising executive is likely being duped by her long-distance virtual boyfriend. Recently out of prison, her wild sister, Tanya (Tiffany Haddish), enlists the help of MTV’s “Catfish” to get to the truth. 110 minutes. (R)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“The Nutcracker and the Four Realms” () A visual spectacle that is wildly imaginative and charming, harnessed to a screenplay that pads out the fable at its heart with an at times needlessly busy narrative. Clara Stahlbaum (Mackenzie Foy) enters an alternate universe with four realms, where all is not as it seems. “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms” can be a little bit scary at times, but in the end is a delightfully old-school diversion. This film also screens in 3-D. 99 minutes. (PG)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“The Old Man and the Gun” () Inspired by true events, this whimsical film stars Robert Redford in a damn good performance as a career criminal who keeps on committing crimes, keeps on getting caught — and keeps on escaping. It’s said to be Redford’s final film as an actor and serves as a fitting curtain call. 93 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Smallfoot” () It’s not often an animated children’s movie features lessons about critical thinking. But in this zippy, silly, zany, cheery little tale, a skeptical Yeti (voice of Channing Tatum) in a land of Yetis learns the value of questioning the status quo. 96 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“A Star is Born” () In his directorial debut, Bradley Cooper (also the leading man) strikes the perfect balance between a showbiz fable and an intimate story with universal truths. As the protege who rockets to fame, Lady Gaga is a winning, natural presence, even in the scenes where she’s nowhere near a piano or a microphone. 136 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Venom” () This dark, wacky outing is a mess, but wow, is it ever a fun, fascinating mess. Tom Hardy plays Eddie Brock, intrepid San Francisco investigative reporter and unwilling host body for alien Symbiote Venom, who turns him into an unlikely killing machine. Their banter is funny, intentionally so, and Hardy’s wild-eyed performance and quirky asides invite you to laugh at the silly madness of it all. 112 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

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