Heads Up

Late night retro series: “Popeye” — Robin Williams and Shelley Duval star in this film adaptation of the cartoon about the adventures of a sailor and his friends in the seaside town of Sweethaven. This film screens at 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. Cost is $4, ages 21 and over. 114 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

The Metropolitan Opera Live: “Madama Butterfly” Encore — In this encore screening of director Anthony Minghella’s breathtaking 2006 production, soprano Kristine Opolais takes on the title role and Roberto Alagna sings Pinkerton, the naval officer who breaks Butterfly’s heart. This film screens at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 (plus fees). Sung in Italian with English subtitles. 160 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Mr. Peabody & Sherman” — A discounted screening of the 2014 animated adventure comedy about a time-traveling advanced canine and his adopted human son as they try to fix a time rift they accidentally created. This film screens at 10 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $1. 92 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Pom Poko” — An animated ecological fable from Studio Ghibli about the tanuki (raccoon dogs) of Tama Hills who find their fun-loving community under attack by encroaching developers. This film screens at 12:55 p.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Wednesday dubbed in English, and at 7 p.m. Monday in Japanese with English subtitles at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 (plus fees). 130 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

RiffTrax Live: “Space Mutiny” — Comedians Mike Nelson, Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbett provide live commentary over the ’80s cult classic, “Space Mutiny.” This cheesy sci-fi film is perfect fodder for the comedy team from the former TV series, “Mystery Science Theater 3000.” This film screens live at 8 p.m. Thursday and in an encore screening at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 (plus fees). 110 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Storks” — A discounted screening of the 2016 animated adventure comedy starring Andy Samberg, Katie Crown and Kelsey Grammer. Storks have moved on from delivering babies to packages. But when an order for a baby appears, the best delivery stork must scramble to fix the error. This film screens at 10 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $1. 87 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Wonder Woman” — In this 2017 blockbuster, a pilot (Chris Pine) crashes on a mysterious island and tells of conflict in the outside world. This inspires Diana (Gal Gadot), an Amazonian warrior in training, to leave her home to fight in the war and discover her full powers and true destiny. This film screens outdoors on the lawn at 7:45 p.m. Friday at LOGE Entrada in Bend. Dog friendly. Free. 141 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

WHAT’S NEW

“First Reformed” () An engrossing story of a bored, despairing country preacher (Ethan Hawke) who is spiritually awakened when called upon to counsel a young parishioner (Phillip Ettinger) who is considering an act of environmental terrorism, to the alarm of his wife (Amanda Seyfried). Uncommonly well-written by director Paul Schrader, and well acted by Hawke, Ettinger and a cast that includes Cedric the Entertainer. 113 minutes. (R)

— Gary Thompson, The Philadelphia Inquirer

“Incredibles 2” () Brad Bird’s sequel is as good, if not better than the 2004 original. Elastigirl (Holly Hunter) is enlisted in a media blitz to make super-powered crime fighting look good. Meanwhile, Mr. Incredible (Craig T. Nelson) finds he’s not so incredible at being Mr. Mom. With jaw-dropping animation, Bird has made a film that puts both the danger and the fun back into superhero stories. This film also screens in 3D and IMAX. 118 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Superfly” () Can the groundbreaking and supercool 1972 blaxspoitation gangster picture be adapted to the world of 2018? “SuperFly,” now set in Atlanta, tries. But lacking the grit and shock factor of the original, this version is just corny and dated. The filmmakers flirt with cultural commentary, but they seem far more interested in the fun stuff: the money, the clothes, the cars, the miles of jiggling female flesh and jarring amounts of gun violence. 116 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Sweet Country” () Director Warwick Thornton ("Samson and Delilah") combines sensitive direction with strong performances and unflinching visuals to create a western of epic proportions. Set in 1920s Australia, “Sweet Country” is concerned with how unspoken prejudice infects a loose community of ranchers and lawmen. If the movie’s outlook is less than hopeful, it nevertheless suggests that there is still time to learn from our mistakes. 113 minutes. (R)

— Alan Zilberman, The Washington Post

“Tag” () A genial comedy (based on a true story) about five best buds who have been playing the same game of tag every May for 30 years. Thanks to the movie’s nimble group of actors (which includes Jon Hamm, Ed Helms, Jeremy Renner, Jake Johnson and Hannibal Buress) and some well-executed ambushes and booby traps, “Tag” winds up being an undemanding, if instantly disposable, pleasure. 100 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

STILL SHOWING

“Action Point” (star rating unavailable) D.C. (Johnny Knoxville) is the crackpot owner of a low-rent amusement park where the rides are designed with minimum safety for maximum fun. When a corporate mega-park opens nearby, D.C. and his crew of misfits pull out all the stops to save his beloved theme park and his relationship with his estranged daughter. 85 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from Paramount Pictures

“Adrift” () Shailene Woodley stars as Tami Oldham, in this film based on Oldham’s life story. After a brutal Pacific Ocean storm, Tami comes to in a sinking yacht, bleeding from a head injury and struggling to survive. The film flashes between Tami and her partner, captain and lover Richard’s (Sam Claflin) courtship in Tahiti and the aftermath of the storm spent aboard the wrecked ship, adrift on the Pacific for 41 days. 90 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Avengers: Infinity War” () The dark, maddeningly open-ended, yet fiercely entertaining new chapter in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), pits the titular global do-gooders against the cosmic villain Thanos and fans have already steeled themselves to the eventuality that favorite characters will die here. “Infinity War” is big, blustery and brave, taking viewers to places that they may not be used to going. 154 minutes. (PG-13)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“Book Club” () Great as it is to see Jane Fonda, Diane Keaton, Mary Steenburgen and Candice Bergen on the big screen, too bad they’re floundering about in this undercooked, silly and often downright inexplicable romantic comedy that plays like lesser Nora Ephron. 104 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Deadpool 2” () Ryan Reynolds’ second turn as the cynical, witty superhero is wicked, dark fun from start to finish, with some twisted and very funny special effects, cool production elements, terrific ensemble work — and for dessert, perhaps the best end-credits “cookie” scene ever. 111 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Hereditary” () Hypnotic and intense throughout, this is a brilliantly executed supernatural thriller where the psychological fallout is just as disturbing as the apparitions that come chillingly to life. Toni Collette, in one her best performances ever, plays Annie, an artist who has just lost her mother. But granny’s haunting legacy will literally and figuratively tear Annie’s family apart. 127 minutes. (R)

— David Lewis, The San Francisco Chronicle

“Hotel Artemis” () A high-energy, gritty-looking and prophetically scary tale set in the near future that comes across as big as any summer blockbuster. In the year 2028 during a violent riot in downtown Los Angeles, Sherman Atkins (Sterling K. Brown) must get his brother, Lev (Brian Tyree), to the only place criminals can get medical attention, Hotel Artemis. 97 minutes. (R)

— Rick Bentley, Tribune News Service

“Let the Sunshine In” () In one of her finest and most subtly calibrated performances, Juliette Binoche plays Isabelle — a divorced painter living in Paris, meeting a series of men and trying them on for size. This is a funny, candid, sexy and kind of sad chronicle of a woman who dares to demand companionship and physical intimacy. In French with subtitles. 94 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Life of the Party” () Absolutely zero new ground is broken in the story of a mom (Melissa McCarthy) joining her daughter at college that owes a debt to “Back to School” (1986). And yet I give “Life of the Party” a solid B on the strength of at least a half-dozen laugh-out-loud moments, some truly sharp dialogue, a tremendously likable cast and the sheer force of its cheerful goofiness. 105 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Ocean’s 8” () A dutiful (also cheeky) heir to the heist franchise with a female-centric cast, headed by Sandra Bullock and also including Cate Blanchett, Mindy Kaling, Rihanna, Awkwafina, Sarah Paulson, Helena Bonham Carter and Anne Hathaway. Debbie Ocean (Bullock) has hit upon a plan to steal a $150 million diamond necklace during the Met Gala. This film also screens in IMAX. 110 minutes. (PG-13)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“Overboard” () This remake of a 1987 rom-com is intertwined with themes of domesticity, class, labor and kidnapping, but is executed without much thought or skill. When single mom Kate (Anna Faris), encounters wealthy party boy Leonardo (Eugenio Derbez), the two get into a spat and Kate’s got enough motivation to later enact some revenge. 112 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“A Quiet Place” () John Krasinski is the director, co-writer and co-star (with his wife, Emily Blunt) of this neatly spun and well-crafted thriller about a family that must maintain complete silence to avoid stirring deadly monsters. That’s a pretty nifty setup to keep the tension going from moment to moment. 90 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“RBG” () The notion of Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as a judicial “rock star” may seem strange. But the lively and thorough profile painted of her by this documentary makes a persuasive argument for that characterization. Rather than focusing on personality, however, the bulk of “RBG” has to do with its subject’s lifelong fight against gender discrimination. 97 minutes. (PG)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“Ready Player One” () In 2045 everyone is nostalgic for 1980s pop culture because everything in 2045 is pretty awful. Wade (Tye Sheridan) has a more satisfying life in the Oasis, a role-playing virtual platform, where he is drawn into a contest to inherit the lucrative Oasis business. But we can see clearly that everyone would be better off if the Oasis simply did not exist. 140 minutes. (PG-13)

— Mick LaSalle, The San Francisco Chronicle

“The Rider” () Subtle, elemental and powerfully beautiful, writer-director Chloe Zhao’s film is the Western of the new century. The lightly fictionalized main character, Brady Blackburn, is portrayed by real-life Lakota cowboy, Brady Jandreau. He has suffered a severe head injury getting thrown off a bronco at a rodeo and his recovery is an uncertain question mark. Brady’s life’s work may kill him; a life without it may kill him more slowly. 104 minutes. (R)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“Super Troopers 2” () In this sequel, 17 years after the original, the hapless lawmen patrol a piece of Quebec newly transferred to America. While there’s something kind of endearing about the disjointed chaos behind the comedy, there are simply too many dead spots and flat gags to carry a full-length feature. 100 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

“Solo: A Star Wars Story” () Director Ron Howard has created a solid, well-carpentered “Star Wars” origin story. What was Han’s life before he became a rogue-for-hire? We find out in clever, exciting fashion. Alden Ehrenreich’s contained, methodical brand of swagger matches up pretty well with the Han Solo we know. “New,” it’s not, but the goal was “same but different.” This film also screens in 3-D. 143 minutes. (PG-13)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“Upgrade” () This brutish, efficient and well-executed slice of cyber-punk action horror imagines a not-so-distant future in which wearable tech has become a body-horror nightmare. It tempers the gratuitous and gory violence with a few laughs. With present-day headlines about out-of-control self-driving cars and smart speakers acting autonomously, “Upgrade” couldn’t feel more timely. 95 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“A Wrinkle in Time” () Ava DuVernay’s adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s mystical sci-fi novel marshalls an array of star power with Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon and Mindy Kaling as the supernatural beings who guide the young Meg (Storm Reid) on her journey through space and time to find her missing father (Chris Pine). 109 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

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