Sports in brief

Published Feb 5, 2014 at 12:01AM

SNOWMOBILING

Drag races set for this weekend — The Central Oregon Snowbusters snowmobile club is hosting its third annual Central Oregon Snowmobile Drag Races this weekend at Wanoga Sno-park. Practice runs start Friday at noon, and racing is set to begin at 11 a.m. both Saturday and Sunday. Racers can preregister Friday from 4 to 7 p.m. at Pro Caliber Bend or register on race days at Wanoga between 7 and 10 a.m. Cost is $45 for each participant’s first class and $30 per class thereafter. Spectators are welcome and admission is free. Food and drinks will be available during the weekend, including a beer garden. For more information, visit www.centraloregonsnowbusters.com or email to cosnowbusters@gmail.com.

—Bulletin staff report

SUPER BOWL

Seattle fans to pay for repairs — More than $26,000 has been raised to pay for repairs to the glass broken by Seahawks fans who climbed on the Pergola in Seattle’s Pioneer Square while celebrating their team’s Super Bowl victory. Organizers posted that a $10,000 donation had been made Tuesday and more than $16,000 had been raised in online funding. Many of the donations came in $12 sums in reference to the team’s 12th Man fan support.

EXTREME SPORTS

Knievel repeat attempt denied — A Texas stuntman’s plans to repeat daredevil Evel Knievel’s famous attempted jump over the Snake River Canyon suffered a setback when the Twin Falls (Idaho) City Council denied his request to lease the site from where Knievel made his failed attempt nearly 40 years ago. A motion to approve the lease to Beckley Media LLC failed on a 5-2 vote on Monday. “Big Ed” Beckley has already paid nearly $1 million for a two-year lease on state land on the north side of the canyon as a landing site, but he also needed permission from the city, which owns Knievel’s takeoff point.

OLYMPIC HOCKEY

Players to don high-tech socks — Some members of the U.S. hockey team heading to the Sochi Games this weekend will be carrying some high-tech gear with them that will be kept under wraps.

Socks. High-tech, performance socks. During the last couple years there has been a growing trend among NHL players trying to protect their lower legs from skate blades. Several manufacturers produce these high-tech socks using a variety of material — including Kevlar and copper — to save calf muscles, Achilles tendons and a player’s feet.

BOXING

Pacquiao, Bradley both seek redemption in rematch — Manny Pacquiao and Timothy Bradley intend to leave no doubt this time. Nearly two years after Bradley beat Pacman in a hotly disputed unanimous decision, the welterweights both seem uncommonly confident as they begin work for their April 12 rematch. Bradley (31-0, 12 KOs) mentioned redemption as his goal several times Tuesday before the fight’s kickoff news conference. He feels wronged by the public’s reaction against his decision victory over Pacquiao in 2012. He believes he’ll earn an even easier victory this time. Pacquiao (55-5-2, 38 KOs) and trainer Freddie Roach are both confident Pacquiao beat Bradley in their first fight.

BASEBALL

Mariners settle with Morrison for $1.75 million — Logan Morrison and the Seattle Mariners have reached agreement on a $1.75 million contract for the 2014 season and avoided arbitration. The team announced the agreement on Tuesday. This season will be Morrison’s first with the Mariners after being acquired in a trade with Miami during the offseason. Morrison’s deal also includes up to $375,000 in performance bonuses based on plate appearances. Morrison had requested $2.5 million and was offered $1.1 million. Morrison has not been able to match the power he showed during the 2011 season when he hit 23 homers with 72 RBIs. Morrison had right knee surgery in September 2012 and missed the first two months of the 2013 season. He hit .242 with six homers and 36 RBIs in 85 games last year.

Braves, Freeman agree to 8-year deal — A person familiar with the talks says the Atlanta Braves have reached an agreement on an eight-year deal with first baseman Freddie Freeman that will be worth about $125 million. Earlier Tuesday, outfielder Jason Heyward and the Braves agreed to a $13.3 million, two-year contract. Heyward and Freeman had filed for salary arbitration last month. The 24-year-old Freeman was an All-Star last year, when he hit .319 with 23 homers and 109 RBIs. He matched his career high in home runs and set highs in batting average and RBIs.

TENNIS

Scans show Nadal on mend from back injury — Medical scans have revealed no serious problems as Rafael Nadal continues his recovery from a back injury sustained at the Australian Open. A statement from the world’s top-ranked player says all checks “were satisfactory and showed positive evolution” regarding the injury, which contributed to his loss to Stanislas Wawrinka in the final in Melbourne. Nadal is continuing to work out in the gym and his return to the tennis court — starting on Thursday — will decide “when he is ready to return to competition.” The Spaniard is scheduled to play in Buenos Aires next week.

BASKETBALL

Bulls C Noah fined by NBA — Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah has been fined by the NBA for yelling at the officials after he was ejected from a game at Sacramento. The league announced the $15,000 penalty on Tuesday. Noah received two technical fouls in less than three minutes during the third quarter of Chicago’s 99-70 loss on Monday night. The All-Star gestured at the referees and yelled obscenities as he was escorted off the court at the 7:40 mark.

MOTOR SPORTS

NASCAR creates new ‘deterrence’ penalty system — NASCAR unveiled a revamped penalty system Tuesday that for the first time will define specific offenses with pre-determined penalties. The new “Deterrence System” classifies six different levels of penalties, with fines and point deductions increasing as the infractions become more severe. The new system will be applied only to technical infractions; NASCAR will still handle behavioral offenses individually. The structure also allows the sanctioning body to hit repeat offenders with a multiplier that could increase penalties by 50 percent. NASCAR’s previous penalty system did not tie pre-determined sanctions to specific offenses. “Our goal is to be more effective, fair and transparent,” said Steve O’Donnell, senior vice president of racing operations. “It’s never our intent to penalize, but in order to keep the playing field fair for everyone, we recognize that strong rules need to be in place.”

— From wire reports