Making the corn maze

Dean Guernsey, Photographer / The Bulletin

The Lisignoli family of Terrebonne starts thinking about Halloween long before the rest of us. The family operates Central Oregon's corn maze, which opens today. The planning begins a year ahead, and the planting is done in the spring. Every year, the family thinks up a different theme and has a maze company design a layout. This year the family is using a dinosaur motif . We followed along to see how the maze featuring two of the giants was created.

A month after the planting, twins Sydney and Summer Lisignoli, 15, analyze a diagram of the maze to mark off its eventual path. Using orange spray paint, they line off the path through the 7 acres of young corn. The process takes about three days.
A month after the planting, twins Sydney and Summer Lisignoli, 15, analyze a diagram of the maze to mark off its eventual path. Using orange spray paint, they line off the path through the 7 acres of young corn. The process takes about three days.
After the corn grows to about 10 feet, workers groom the pathway, removing weeds and rogue corn plants. Decorations and bridges are then added in preparation for a month’s worth of wandering visitors. What remains is a maze of maize representing the Jurassic period and a couple of its inhabitants.
After the field is marked, their father, Matt Lisignoli, owner of Central Oregon Pumpkin Co., uses a chemical sprayer to kill the corn that’s growing in the pathways.
After the field is marked, their father, Matt Lisignoli, owner of Central Oregon Pumpkin Co., uses a chemical sprayer to kill the corn that’s growing in the pathways.