Oregon wildfire update

Firefighters fully contained three out of 16 fires Thursday in Central and Eastern Oregon, according to national fire reports.

1. Ball Point Fire

• 1,150 acres • 60 percent containment • Cause: Lightning

2. Warm Springs Agency Lightning Complex

• 4,665 acres • 10 percent containment • 28 structures threatened • Cause: Lightning

3. Battle Creek Complex

• 17,880 acres • 0 percent containment • Cause: Lightning

4. Trout Creek Fire

• 514 acres • 45 percent containment • Cause: Lightning

5. Looney Spring Fire

• 145 acres • 80 percent containment • Cause: Lightning

6. Bear Fire

• 160 acres • 90 percent containment • Cause: Lightning

7. Monument Complex

• 35,000 acres • 20 percent containment • 20 structures threatened • Cause: Lightning

8. Cottonwood Creek Fire

• 8,100 acres • 60 percent containment • Cause: Lightning

9. Stove Pipe Fire

• 770 acres • 100 percent containment • Cause: Lightning

10. Juniper Reservoir Fire

• 33,000 acres • 50 percent containment • 24 structures and power lines threatened • Cause: Lightning

11. Black Rock Fire

• 1,850 acres • 100 percent containment • Cause: Lightning

12. Fossil Creek Fire

• 3,155 acres • 80 percent containment • Cause: Lightning

13. Egley Complex

• 137,000 acres • 70 percent containment • 117 structures threatened and evacuations in effect • Cause: Lightning

14. Juniper Canyon Fire

• 1,000 acres • 75 percent containment • Cause: Lightning

15. Calamity Complex

• 2,276 acres • 100 percent containment • Cause: Lightning

16. Old Maid Fire

• 1,928 acres • 0 percent containment • Cause: Lightning four structures threatened

Source: Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch, National Interagency Fire Center, Warm Springs Fire Management

National fire officials have raised the country’s wildfire preparedness level to its highest notch, indicating that resources across the country are stretched thin, but the change shouldn’t have an immediate impact on Central Oregon, according to the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center.

Jerry Barney, the floor supervisor with COID, said the higher preparedness level, which the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise now has at level five, “just puts everybody on alert nationwide.”

But Barney added that the recent cool, wet weather has improved Central Oregon’s situation.

A total of 16 fires and complexes had burned nearly 250,000 acres in Central and Eastern Oregon as of Thursday.

“We’re sitting pretty well,” he said. “We have gotten most of our initial attack resources back in place — a lot of them were tied up on some of the larger fires (and) they’ve been released from those and are back home, and so they’re sitting on the divisions and ready to go.”

— Rachael Scarborough King