Bavaria in the Cascades

John Gottberg Anderson / For The Bulletin Published Dec 2, 2007 at 04:00AM
Christmas lights adorn the Bavarian-style buildings along Front Street in downtown Leavenworth, Wash. The North Cascades village celebrates the holiday season with Christmas Lighting Festival during the first three weekends of December.
Host Leroy Hall serves a plate of schweinshax’n, or pork hocks, at King Ludwig’s Restaurant in the heart of Bavarian Leavenworth. Hall has lived most of his life in Leavenworth: “There’s no place I’d rather be,” he said.
Enzian Inn developer Bob Johnson plays his 8-foot alphorn on the hotel’s fourth-floor balcony to awaken the community in traditional Alpine style each morning. The musical instrument’s low, mellow tones have become widely known throughout Leavenworth, Wash.
Nutcrackers from the Volker Füchtner studio in Germany, on display at the Leavenworth Nutcracker Museum, show 50 years of subtle evolution. Füchtners ancestor, Wilhelm Füchtner, is credited with the first commercial production of lathed nutcrackers in 1872.
Arlene Wagner, founder of the Leavenworth Nutcracker Museum, poses with carved 15th- and 16th-century wooden nutcrackers from France and England. There are roughly 6,000 nutcrackers in Wagner’s collection, extending across 40 nations and 2,000 years of time.
Host Leroy Hall serves a plate of schweinshax’n, or pork hocks, at King Ludwig’s Restaurant in the heart of Bavarian Leavenworth. Hall has lived most of his life in Leavenworth: “There’s no place I’d rather be,” he said.
Nutcrackers from the Volker Füchtner studio in Germany, on display at the Leavenworth Nutcracker Museum, show 50 years of subtle evolution. Füchtners ancestor, Wilhelm Füchtner, is credited with the first commercial production of lathed nutcrackers in 1872.
Don-Ann Steenberg plays button accordion to entertain guests as the Andreas Keller, Leavenworth’s nearest relative to a German beer hall. The restaurant features live music nightly, and its sister restaurant, Cafè Mozart, offers regular harp concertos.
A large carved sign welcomes visitors to the Northwest’s most Bavarian community. Leavenworth changed its image in the mid-1960s to give its struggling economy a boost through tourism.