Rescuing a Vietnam Casualty: Johnson’s Legacy

By ADAM NAGOURNEY New York Times News Service Published Feb 16, 2014 at 11:21PM
FILE -- President Lyndon B. Johnson greeting a crowd in 1964. Family and friends of Johnson say that his presidential legacy has been tainted by the Vietnam War, and they are working to highlight his legislative milestones on their 50th anniversary in February 2014. (George Tames/The New York Times)
Images on display at the L.B.J Presidential Library and Museum in Austin, Texas, Feb. 11, 2014. A Civil Rights Summit is to be held there in April to commemorate Johnson's signing of the Civil Rights Act. (Ilana Panich-Linsman/The New York Times)
The Great Hall at the L.B.J. Presidential Library and Museum in Austin, Texas, Feb. 11, 2014. As the 50th anniversary of Lyndon B. Johnson’s presidential milestones approaches, his allies are highlighting domestic successes they say were overshadowed by the Vietnam War. (Ilana Panich-Linsman/The New York Times)
Mark Updegrove, director of the L.B.J. Presidential Library and Museum, among the archives at the library in Austin, Texas, Feb. 11, 2014. Updegrove said that the Vietnam War would forever keep Johnson out of the ranks of America's greatest presidents, but added, "There's no question he should be judged on the entirety of his policy." (Ilana Panich-Linsman/The New York Times)
Glasses belonging to President Lyndon B. Johnson inside a replica of the Oval Office at the L.B.J. Presidential Library and Museum in Austin, Texas, Feb. 11, 2014. As the 50th anniversary of Lyndon B. Johnson’s presidential milestones approaches, his allies are highlighting domestic successes they say were overshadowed by the Vietnam War. (Ilana Panich-Linsman/The New York Times)
The L.B.J. Presidential Library and Museum in Austin, Texas, Feb. 11, 2014. As the 50th anniversary of Lyndon B. Johnson’s presidential milestones approaches, his allies are highlighting domestic successes they say were overshadowed by the Vietnam War. (Ilana Panich-Linsman/The New York Times)