Mother of U.S. captive in Syria pleas for his life

By Diaa Hadid and John Heilprin / The Associated Press

Lawmakers call for vote on military strikes

WASHINGTON — A bipartisan group of lawmakers on Wednesday called for Congress to debate and vote on whether to authorize President Barack Obama to take military action against Sunni militants in Iraq and Syria.

In a letter to Speaker John A. Boehner, the lawmakers — Reps. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., and James McGovern, D-Mass., and Walter B. Jones, R-N.C. — said it was time for Congress to weigh in on whether to give Obama the power to broaden what began as a limited military mission in Iraq.

The number of U.S. troops and airstrikes in Iraq has “increased significantly” while lawmakers have been on their August break, the three House members said, and the administration has begun weighing whether to expand the operation to Syria.

— New York Times News Service

BEIRUT — The mother of a hostage American journalist pleaded for his release Wednesday in a video directed at the Islamic State group, while new images emerged of mass killings, including masked militants shooting kneeling men after the capture of a strategic air base in Syria.

Shirley Sotloff’s plea came as a U.N. commission accused the group, which dominates a broad swath of territory spanning the Syria-Iraq border, of committing crimes against humanity and President Barack Obama weighs options for targeting the extremists’ stronghold in Syria.

The Islamic State militants have threatened to kill 31-year-old Steven Sotloff unless the U.S. halts its airstrikes against it.

Sotloff, who freelanced for Time and Foreign Policy magazines, had last been seen in Syria in August 2013 until he appeared in a video released online last week by the Islamic State group showing the beheading of fellow American journalist, James Foley. Dressed in an orange jumpsuit against the backdrop of an arid Syrian landscape, Sotloff was threatened with death unless the U.S. stopped airstrikes on the group in Iraq.

Addressing the leader of the Islamic State group by name, Shirley Sotloff said her son was “an innocent journalist” who shouldn’t pay for U.S. government actions in the Middle East over which he has no control.

Appealing directly to Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who describes himself as a caliph, or Islamic leader intending to lead the Muslim world, she implored him to show mercy and follow the example of the prophet Muhammad.

“You, the caliph, can grant amnesty. I ask you, please, to release my child. I ask you to use your authority to spare his life,” Shirley Sotloff said on the video, which was first aired on the Al-Arabiya television network. It was widely retweeted by Islamic State supporters later Wednesday with her face blurred because their ultra-conservative interpretation of Islam prohibits showing a woman’s face.

At the White House, spokesman Josh Earnest told reporters he did not know whether Obama had seen Shirley Sotloff’s video appeal, but he said the administration was “deeply engaged” in trying to gain release of all Americans held hostage in the Middle East.

“She obviously, as is evident from the video, feels desperate about the safety and well-being of her son, and understandably so, and that is why our thoughts and prayers are with Mr. Sotloff’s family at this very difficult and trying time,” Earnest said.

Meanwhile, new images emerged of the extremists’ bloody takeover of an air base in northeastern Syria.

In one photo posted on the militant group’s website, masked gunmen were seen shooting seven men kneeling on the ground, some dressed in what appeared to be Syrian military uniforms, after the seizure of the Tabqa air base in the province of Raqqa earlier this week.

The photos underscored how the group uses violence, and images of violence to terrorize its opponents, as it sweeps further into Syria and Iraq, where it has imposed an Islamic state, or caliphate, governed by its harsh interpretation of Islamic law.

Some photos showed captured Syrian soldiers, many with bloodied and swollen faces. In one, a masked Islamic State fighter stood behind a group of soldiers brandishing a knife of the type the militants have used is the past to behead victims, including Foley. In another, a militant grinned as he pressed a double-edged sword against the neck of a captured soldier inside a jeep.