One year after shocking terrorist attack, Pakistan’s peaks bereft of foreign climbers

Tim Craig The Washington Post Published Jul 1, 2014 at 03:51PM
Max Becherer / Polaris Images / The Washington Post The flag of Pakistan waves in the breeze as the sun sets on the world's ninth highest mountain, Nanga Parbat, at the mountain resort of Fairy Meadows in Pakistan on Friday, June 13, 2014. Last year 10 international climbers on an expedition to the summit of Nanga Parbat were murdered by Taliban gunmen, an event which has caused the number of international visitors to the mountain to plummet.
Max Becherer / Polaris Images / The Washington Post An armed police officer walks with tourists taking in the view at the base of the world's ninth highest mountain, Nanga Parbat, in Pakistan on Saturday, June 14, 2014. Extra security has been added to the mountain trails since 10 international mountain climbers were killed by Pakistani Taliban militants.
Max Becherer / Polaris Images / The Washington Post Police watch the road between Gilgit and Karimabad at a security post near Chalt, Pakistan, on Friday, June 13, 2014. Since the murder of 10 international climbers on the mountain Naga Parbat last year local officials say extra security measures have been put in place. But the massacre has caused Pakistan's tourism industry to collapse.