Study finds medical pot farms draining streams dry

JASON DEAREN Associated Press Published Jun 2, 2014 at 06:01PM
California Department of Fish and Wildlife / AP Photo This undated graphic released by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife shows daily estimated total water use in residences, greenhouses and outdoor grows in the Salmon Creek Watershed, in Humboldt County, Calif. Some drought-stricken rivers and streams in Northern California’s coastal forests are being polluted and sucked dry by water-guzzling medical marijuana farms, wildlife officials say _ an issue that has spurred at least one county to try to outlaw personal grows.
California Department of Fish and Wildlife / AP Photo This May 2013 photo released by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) shows a DFW diver conducting an underwater survey to count young salmon and steelhead fish in a tributary to the South Fork Eel River in Humboldt County, Calif. Some drought-stricken rivers and streams in Northern California’s coastal forests are being polluted and sucked dry by water-guzzling medical marijuana farms, wildlife officials say -- an issue that has spurred at least one county to try to outlaw personal grows.
California Department of Fish and Wildlife / AP Photo This undated graphic released by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife shows daily estimated total water use in residences, greenhouses and outdoor grows in the Outlet Creek, a tributary of the Eel River, in Mendocino County, Calif. Some drought-stricken rivers and streams in Northern California’s coastal forests are being polluted and sucked dry by water-guzzling medical marijuana farms, wildlife officials say -- an issue that has spurred at least one county to try to outlaw personal grows.
California Department of Fish and Wildlife / AP Photo This 2013 photo released by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) shows a DFW environmental scientist holding a dead juvenile coho salmon found in Little Larabee Creek in Humboldt County, Calif. Some drought-stricken rivers and streams in Northern California’s coastal forests are being polluted and sucked dry by water-guzzling medical marijuana farms, wildlife officials say -- an issue that has spurred at least one county to try to outlaw personal grows.