Candidates vie for Afghan women’s vote

KIM GAMEL Associated Press Published Mar 19, 2014 at 07:01PM
AP Photo / Massoud Hossaini In this photo taken on Monday, March 17, 2014, Afghan vice presidential candidate, Habiba Sarabi, greets her supporters during a campaign rally in Kabul, Afghanistan. Sarabi, who already has been the first female governor in Afghanistan, is the most prominent woman running on a ticket in the April 5 election that will mark the first democratic transfer of power since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion that ousted the Taliban. But she faces cultural norms in this deeply conservative Islamic society.
AP Photo / Massoud Hossaini In this photo taken on Monday, March 17, 2014, female supporters of Afghan vice presidential candidate, Habiba Sarabi, chat during a campaign rally in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Afghan vice presidential candidate strode down the aisle separating hundreds of male and female supporters at a campaign rally in Kabul. She shook hands with the women filling the chairs to her right. To the men on the other side, she simply nodded. Writing on the flags reads, "vote for Zalmai Rassoul."
AP Photo / Anja Niedringhaus An Afghan woman adjusts her head scarf as her picture is taken to register for the upcoming presidential election in a school on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan, Wednesday, March 19, 2014. Last minute registration of voters continues despite the fact that more than 21 million voter registration cards have been issued while only roughly 12 million Afghans are eligible to vote. The discrepancy is the result of repeated registrations since the first round of elections in Afghanistan in 2004.
AP Photo / Massoud Hossaini In this photo taken on Monday, March 17, 2014, female supporters of Afghan vice presidential candidate, Habiba Sarabi and Afghan presidential candidate Zalmai Rassoul hold flags with his photo and two vice presidential candidate's during a campaign rally in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Afghan vice presidential candidate strode down the aisle separating hundreds of male and female supporters at a campaign rally in Kabul. She shook hands with the women filling the chairs to her right. To the men on the other side, she simply nodded. Writing on the flags reads, "vote for Zalmai Rassoul."
AP Photo / Massoud Hossaini In this photo taken on Monday, March 17, 2014, an Afghan girl attends a campaign rally in support of Afghan vice presidential candidate, Habiba Sarabi in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Afghan vice presidential candidate strode down the aisle separating hundreds of male and female supporters at a campaign rally in Kabul. She shook hands with the women filling the chairs to her right. To the men on the other side, she simply nodded. Writing on the flags reads, "vote for Zalmai Rassoul."
AP Photo / Massoud Hossaini In this photo taken on Monday, March 17, 2014, Afghan vice presidential candidate, Habiba Sarabi, center, arrives to a campaign rally in Kabul, Afghanistan. Sarabi, who already has been the first female governor in Afghanistan, is the most prominent woman running on a ticket in the April 5, 2014 election that will mark the first democratic transfer of power since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion that ousted the Taliban. But she faces cultural norms in this deeply conservative Islamic society.
AP Photo / Massoud Hossaini In this photo taken on Monday, March 17, 2014, female supporters of Afghan vice presidential candidate, Habiba Sarabi and Afghan presidential candidate Zalmai Rassoul hold flags with his photo and two vice presidential candidate's during a campaign rally in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Afghan vice presidential candidate strode down the aisle separating hundreds of male and female supporters at a campaign rally in Kabul. She shook hands with the women filling the chairs to her right. To the men on the other side, she simply nodded. Writing on the flags reads, "vote for Zalmai Rassoul."
AP Photo / Massoud Hossaini In this photo taken on Monday, March 17, 2014, supporters of Afghan vice presidential candidate, Habiba Sarabi and Afghan presidential candidate Zalmai Rassoul hold flags with his photo and two vice presidential candidate's photos during a campaign rally in Kabul, Afghanistan. Sarabi, who already has been the first female governor in Afghanistan, is the most prominent woman running on a ticket in the April 5, 2014 election that will mark the first democratic transfer of power since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion that ousted the Taliban. But she still faces cultural norms in this deeply conservative Islamic society. The stadium where Sarabi gave her address was equally packed with men and women, although they sat on separate sides of the room. Writing on the flags reads, "vote for Zalmai Rassoul."
AP Photo / Anja Niedringhaus An Afghan man cheerfully shows his voter registration card after lining up for hours outside a school on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan, Wednesday, March 19, 2014. Last minute registration of voters continues despite the fact that more than 21 million voter registration cards have been issued while only roughly 12 million Afghans are eligible to vote. The discrepancy is the result of repeated registrations since the first round of elections in Afghanistan in 2004.
AP Photo / Anja Niedringhaus Afghan woman, Hanifa sits down to have her picture taken to register for the upcoming presidential elections in a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Last minute registration of voters continues despite the fact that more than 21 million voter registration cards have been issued while only roughly 12 million Afghans are eligible to vote. The discrepancy is the result of repeated registrations since the first round of elections in Afghanistan in 2004.
AP Photo / Anja Niedringhaus Afghan women line up to have their picture taken to register for the upcoming presidential elections in a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Last minute registration of voters continues despite the fact that more than 21 million voter registration cards have been issued while only roughly 12 million Afghans are eligible to vote. The discrepancy is the result of repeated registrations since the first round of elections in Afghanistan in 2004.
AP Photo / Anja Niedringhaus Afghan women wait with their children to register for the upcoming presidential elections in a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Last minute registration of voters continues despite the fact that more than 21 million voter registration cards have been issued while only roughly 12 million Afghans are eligible to vote. The discrepancy is the result of repeated registrations since the first round of elections in Afghanistan in 2004.
AP Photo / Anja Niedringhaus Afghan women wait next to a window with stickers displayed urging people to get their election registration cards outside a school room on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan, Wednesday, March 19, 2014. Last minute registration of voters continues despite the fact that more than 21 million voter registration cards have been issued while only roughly 12 million Afghans are eligible to vote. The discrepancy is the result of repeated registrations since the first round of elections in Afghanistan in 2004.
AP Photo / Anja Niedringhaus Afghan men wait outside a school to register for the upcoming presidential election on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan, Wednesday, March 19, 2014. Last minute registration of voters continues despite the fact that more than 21 million voter registration cards have been issued while only roughly 12 million Afghans are eligible to vote. The discrepancy is the result of repeated registrations since the first round of elections in Afghanistan in 2004.