Oregon moose population higher than ever

By Tara Bannow • The Bulletin
Published Jan 26, 2014 at 12:11AM / Updated Jan 31, 2014 at 03:30PM

Moose facts

• There are four subspecies of moose in North America. The Shiras moose occupies the Rocky Mountain region of the U.S., including Oregon and southern British Columbia. The smallest subspecies, Shiras moose stand up to 6 feet tall at the shoulder. Mature bulls weigh an average of 1,000 pounds and have an antler width of less than 60 inches.

• Moose breed from mid-September through mid-October. Calves are born in mid to late May.

• In 1922, wildlife workers attempted to transfer moose to the Oregon coast to spur a native moose population in the state. It was unsuccessful. By 1931, the last moose was killed.

• Moose prefer habitats with dense, heavy cover, which makes them difficult to spot in the wild.

Source: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

Submitted photo / Pat Matthews, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife A female moose (cow) pauses near the Grande Ronde River southwest of Troy, Oregon in January 2009. This moose was not part of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife study.
Submitted photo / Pat Matthews, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife A female moose pauses near the Grande Ronde River southwest of Troy, Oregon in January 2009. This moose was not part of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife study.
Submitted photo / Pat Matthews, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife This male moose (bull) was fitted with a GPS collar as part of an Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife study that tracked its migration and feeding habits, among other things. This photo of the bull was taken in September 2008 in the North Fork Umatilla River drainage.
Submitted photo / Pat Matthews, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Male moose wanders the forest near Lookout Mountain north of Elgin, Oregon in September 2008. This moose was not part of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife study.
Submitted photo / Pat Matthews, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Pat Matthews with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (right) poses with a moose that was fitted with a collar in 2008 in the Wenaha area west of Troy to participate in a study in which researchers tracked movements, habitats and other data on moose in Oregon. The other man in the photo is part of a professional team that helps capture animals. Blindfolding the moose helps keep them calm.