Heads Up

Late Night Retro Series: “An Affair to Remember” — In this 1957 dramatic romance, a couple (Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr) falls in love and agrees to meet in six months at the Empire State Building — but will it happen? This film screens at 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. Cost is $4. Adults only. 115 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Mazinger Z: INFINITY” — In this animated film, 10 years have passed since young hero Koji Kabuto piloted the super robot Mazinger Z to victory over Dr. Hell and his followers. Now a scientist, Koji encounters something deep under Mount Fuji that poses an even greater threat to mankind. In Japanese with English subtitles. This film screens at 12:55 p.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Monday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 (plus fees). 100 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

The Metropolitan Opera Live: “L’Elisir d’Amore” — Bartlett Sher’s production of Donizetti’s comedic opera is conducted by Domingo Hindoyan and stars Pretty Yende as the feisty Adina and Matthew Polenzani as Nemorino. This event screens live at 9 a.m. Saturday and in encore screenings at 1 and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $20 (plus fees). 180 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

Page to Screen: “The Glass Castle” — Read Jeannette Walls’ best-selling memoir “The Glass Castle,” then watch the film starring Brie Larson, Woody Harrelson and Naomi Watts. A discussion about the book and movie will be led by a librarian from Deschutes Public Library following the screening. This film screens at 5 p.m. Monday at Tin Pan Theater in Bend. Free (seating is limited). 127 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Wonder Woman” — When a World War II pilot (Chris Pine) crashes on a mysterious island and tells the inhabitants of conflict in the outside world, Diana (Gal Gadot) — an Amazonian warrior in training — leaves home to fight a war, discovering her full powers and true destiny. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Rodriguez Annex — Jefferson County Library in Madras. Free. 141 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

WHAT’S NEW

“The 15:17 to Paris” () In 2015, three young American men boarded a train in Amsterdam, en route to Paris. In Brussels, another young man boarded with a backpack full of guns and ammunition and eventually found himself in a car with the trio of Americans. Director Clint Eastwood cast the major players as themselves in this blend of documentary and narrative filmmaking. It’s a risk that doesn’t quite pay off. The action sequence on the train is truly remarkable, but the surrounding film doesn’t serve this thrilling true-life story. 94 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts — Animation (star rating unavailable) See all the 2018 Academy Award contenders for best animated short film including “Dear Basketball,” “Negative Space,” “Lou,” “Revolting Rhymes” and”Garden Party,” plus three additional animated shorts: “Lost Property Office,” “Weeds” and Achoo.” 75 minutes. (No MPAA rating) .

— Synopsis from ShortsTV

2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts — Live Action (star rating unavailable) See all the 2018 Academy Award contenders for best live action short film including “DeKalb Elementary,” “The Silent Child,” “My Nephew Emmett,” “The Eleven O’Clock” and “Watu Wote/All of Us.” 100 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from ShortsTV

2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts — Documentary (star rating unavailable) See the 2018 Academy Award contenders for best documentary short film. Program A will screen through Feb. 15 and includes “Traffic Stop,” “Edith + Eddie” and “Heaven is a Traffic Jam on the 405.” Running time: 102 minutes. Program B will begin screening Feb. 16 and includes “Heroin(e)” and “Knife Skills.” Running time: 82 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from ShortsTV

“Fifty Shades Freed” () In the third and (thank the cinema gods) final chapter in the vapid, lurid, S&M-sprinkled trilogy of slick trash, newlyweds Ana (Dakota Johnson) and Christian (Jamie Dornan) eventually leave the sexy stuff behind and fall into a combo platter of cheesy, easily solved mystery-thriller and overwrought daytime soap opera melodrama. 105 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Peter Rabbit” () The photorealistic animation is truly breathtaking, but all put in service of a savage and brutal war between rabbit Peter (James Corden) and the fussy Thomas (Domhnall Gleeson), due to jealousy over Bea (Rose Byrne). Ultimately, after the dust has settled, the lesson at hand is one of peaceful coexistence with the environment. There’s also a message about owning your actions, even if you are a tiny, talking bunny. 93 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

STILL SHOWING

“12 Strong” () The film is based on Doug Stanton’s book “Horse Soldiers,” which describes one of the ways a special forces team adapted to the rugged landscape of Afghanistan — on horseback — while battling the Taliban in the shadow of 9/11. 132 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Coco” () Disney-Pixar’s “Coco” is a bouncy and heart-tugging adventure told through the experiences of a 12-year-old boy (Anthony Gonzalez) who crosses over, while alive, from his village in Mexico to the Land of the Dead, an exciting metropolis populated by deceased humans. The visuals jump off the screen. 104 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“The Commuter” () Michael (Liam Neeson) is approached by a strange woman (Vera Farmiga) with a question: Would you find and do something to another passenger on this train for $100,000? As soon as Michael gets a whiff of the cash, he’s in too deep with a shadowy, murderous mob. Ultimately, the film gets the job done, but it won’t get hearts racing. 104 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Darkest Hour” () This look back at Winston Churchill’s leadership during the early days of World War II is filled with authentic touches, large and small. Most authentic of all is Gary Oldman’s performance as a flawed but deeply passionate man who summoned all of his courage, all of his oratory skills and all of his love for Britain. 125 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“The Disaster Artist” () Given James Franco’s sometimes perplexing resume, he’s the right guy to direct and star as Tommy Wiseau in a movie about the making of the infamously bad cult debacle “The Room.” Franco’s film is breezy and even affectionate. 98 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Downsizing” () Matt Damon is a good guy who agrees to be shrunk to 5 inches tall as a way to reduce his environmental footprint — and enjoy a more luxurious life. At first a raucous comedy with some social commentary, director Alexander Payne’s film loses its way for a while, and it feels as if we’re being lectured a bit too much in the home stretch. 135 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Forever My Girl” () Homegrown country pop star Liam Page (Alex Roe) ditches his high school sweetheart Josie (Jessica Rothe) at the altar during a frenzy surrounding his first hit single. Eight years later sad news from his hometown of Saint Augustine, Louisiana. For an audience, seeking fluffy, escapist, country music-tinged romance, it’ll hit a sweet spot. 104 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Greatest Showman” () There were times when I rolled my eyes to the ceiling at the corny and shameless sentiment of this musical starring Hugh Jackman as P.T. Barnum. But then I’d realize my foot was once again tapping in time to the beat of the catchy tunes, at which point, I’d acknowledge I was thoroughly enjoying myself, despite all cynical instincts. This film also screens in IMAX. 105 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Hostiles” () Christian Bale is at the laser-focused top of his game (and perfectly cast) as an Old West soldier escorting a freed Cheyenne chief (Wes Studi) and his family to their ancestral land. “Hostiles” winds up being about having a heart in a world that seems almost without hope. 133 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“I, Tonya” () Recounting the life of skater Tonya Harding in both a darkly funny comedy and a serious character study is a tricky and bold balancing act, and the “I, Tonya” team pulls it off on every level. 119 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“In the Fade” () This is the story of a woman (Diane Kruger) whose husband and 6-year-old son are killed in a bombing. But here, the tired screen stereotypes about terrorism are reversed, with immigrants of Muslim background as the senseless crime’s innocent victims, and the far-right movement its perpetrators. It’s a deeply unsettling film. In German with English subtitles. 105 minutes. (R)

— Vanessa H. Larson, The Washington Post“Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” () This time around, Jumanji is an old video game dusted off by a motley crew of high-schoolers who are vaporized into the game world and into their respective physical game forms. This is a one-joke movie, but thanks to impeccable casting and fun performances by Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Jack Black and Karen Gillan, that joke is executed very well. 119 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Lady Bird” () Greta Gerwig has written and directed a film that’s smart without being smug and insightful without being condescending. Saoirse Ronan delivers a pure and honest performance as the title character, a high school senior, and the work by Laurie Metcalf and Tracy Letts as her parents is what greatness looks like. 93 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Maze Runner: The Death Cure” () Despite a strong cast, striking locations and slick digital effects, the overlong third installment in this sci-fi franchise lurches from chase to battle to soul-searching quietude — and then back again — in frustratingly generic action-movie style. Still, for teenage fans of the books and movies this finale is not likely to disappoint. 141 minutes. (PG-13)

— Jane Horwitz, The Washington Post

“Molly’s Game” () Jessica Chastain gives a nomination-worthy performance as the organizer of high-stakes, A-list poker games that aren’t exactly legal. With his feature directing debut, Aaron Sorkin hits a home run — a glimpse of life in the fast lane, a sobering cautionary tale and a brilliant character study. 140 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Paddington 2” () The family-friendly sequel to the 2014 film about a talking bear cub named Paddinton (voiced by Ben Whishaw) is a charmer from its first action-packed frames to its over-the-top jailhouse-musical scene during the end credits. 103 minutes. (PG)

— Stephanie Merry, The Washington Post

“Phantom Thread” () Daniel Day-Lewis delivers another Oscar-worthy performance as a fashion designer in mid-20th-century London who has a very specific way of doing things. The attention to detail, the use of certain colors, the lush and vibrant photography of the dresses made — they’re honestly breathtaking.130 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Pitch Perfect 3” () In the final farewell of the trilogy, “Pitch Perfect 3” the Bellas decide to hop on a USO tour. The film is truly a showcase for Rebel Wilson’s brazen and silly brand of humor, and she even gets some wild fight scenes. The film is so breezy it’s completely weightless, but it manages to deliver just enough of the goods. 93 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Post” () As 1970s Washington Post publisher Kay Graham, Meryl Streep does an astonishing job of showing us someone unsure of herself as she debates publishing the Pentagon Papers and risking jail. This is a love letter to journalistic bravery and to the First Amendment, and it is the best movie about newspapers since “All the President’s Men.” 115 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“The Shape of Water” () Sally Hawkins gives a sweet and moving performance as a maid in a top-secret government facility who falls in love with a mysterious sea creature in captivity there. Gorgeously color-coordinated, this fairy tale from director Guillermo del Toro is one of the most romantic and most breathtakingly beautiful movies of the year. 118 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Star Wars: The Last Jedi” () Although it doesn’t pack quite the same emotional punch as “The Force Awakens” and lags a bit in the second half, this is still a worthy chapter in the “Star Wars” franchise, popping with exciting action sequences and sprinkled with good humor. Surprises big and small abound. 152 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” () The story of a grieving mother (Frances McDormand) trying to shame the police chief (Woody Harrelson) into solving her daughter’s murder provides some of the strongest laughs and most poignant moments of heartbreak of any movie in recent memory. 115 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Winchester” () Like the spirits in the senseless corridors of Sarah Winchester’s (Helen Mirren) never-ending Victorian construction project, this movie is stuck in its own limbo. Does it want to be a haunted house full of jump scares? Does it want to be a Gothic period piece? “Winchester” is both, and neither. The ending tries to be thoughtful, but there’s not enough investment in these characters to care. 99 minutes. (PG-13)

— Peter Hartlaub, San Francisco Chronicle

“Wonder” () The story of Auggie (Jacob Tremblay), a young boy with a genetic facial deformity attending school for the first time. Adapted from R.J. Palacio’s book, the messages of “Wonder” are ones we should all take to heart: to choose kindness and to define ourselves through our deeds. 113 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

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