Heads Up

“Casablanca” 75th Anniversary Event — In this film set against the backdrop of World War II, Humphrey Bogart stars as Rick Blaine, the owner of a nightclub in Vichy-controlled Casablanca, whose life changes forever when his lost love, Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman), walks into his club and back into his life. This film screens at 2 and 7 p.m. Sunday and Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 (plus fees). 120 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Genesis: Paradise Lost” — As questions continue about the Bible’s story of creation, this film uses visual effects to bring Genesis to life on the big screen. This film screens at 7 p.m. Monday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $15 for 3-D or $12.50 for 2-D (plus fees). 130 minutes. (G)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Ivan’s Childhood” — BendFilm’s Second Sunday Cinema presents the 1962 debut by director Andrei Tarkovsky about 12-year-old Soviet orphan Ivan Bondarev who works for the Soviet army as a scout behind the German lines during World War II and strikes a friendship with three sympathetic Soviet officers. This film screens at 1:30 p.m. Sunday at Touchmark at Mount Bachelor Village in Bend. Free (registration recommended at 541-383-1414). 84 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDB.com

“Justice League” — Fueled by his restored faith in humanity and inspired by the selfless act of Superman (Henry Cavill), Bruce Wayne (Ben Affleck) enlists the help of his newfound ally, Diana Prince (Gal Gadot), to face an even greater enemy. Together, they recruit a league of heroes that also includes Aquaman (Jason Momoa), Cyborg (Ray Fisher) and The Flash (Ezra Miller) — but it may already be too late to save the planet. This film opens Nov. 17 with early screenings Nov. 16. 110 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“The Lost Boys” — After moving to a new town, two brothers (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) discover that the area is a haven for vampires in this 1987 comedy horror. This film screens at 10:45 p.m. Friday and Saturday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. Cost is $4. 97 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“More Than a Word” — A documentary that looks inside the growing movement to change the name of the Washington Redskins football team. It explores what’s truly at stake in contemporary debates about cultural appropriation and Native American-themed mascots. This film screens at noon Monday at Central Oregon Community College in Madras. Free. 70 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Mully” — The inspirational true story of Charles Mully, whose unlikely rise to wealth and power after being abandoned on the streets of Kenya at age 6 leaves him searching for meaning in his life. Against the judgment of his family and community, Mully sets out to enrich the fate of orphaned children across Kenya. This film screens at 7 p.m. Thursday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $15 or $12.50 for children (plus fees). 100 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Pokémon the Movie: I Choose You!” — This animated feature explores Ash and Pikachu’s first meeting and their adventures as they search for the Legendary Pokémon Ho-Oh. This film screens at 12:55 p.m. Saturday and 7 p.m. Tuesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 (plus fees). 95 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Run Lola Run” — In this 1998 German crime drama, Lola (Franka Potente) has 20 minutes to come up with 100,000 deutsch marks after a botched money delivery. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Jefferson County Library — Rodriquez Annex in Madras. Free. 80 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“The Running Man” — The year is 2017, the economy has collapsed, America has sealed its borders and the government controls all communication. A wrongly convicted man (Arnold Schwarzenegger) must try to survive a public execution gauntlet staged as a game show. Thomas del Ruth, the film’s cinematographer and a former Bend resident, will share his memories and observations on the stylish — and prophetic — action movie from 1987. This film screens at 7 p.m. Sunday at the Tower Theatre in Bend. Cost is $14 (plus fees). 101 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from the Tower Theatre

“Scarred Lands & Ruined Lives — The Environmental Footprint of War” — A 2008 documentary about the unprecedented scale of environmental damage over the last half century caused by war and preparation for war. This film screens at 12:30 p.m. Saturday at the Downtown Bend Library. Free. 68 minutes. (No MPAA rating).

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

WHAT’S NEW

“Daddy’s Home 2” () In this sour, cynical and profoundly unfunny sequel, touchy-feely Brad (Will Ferrell) and gruff Dusty (Mark Wahlberg) celebrate the holidays with their dads (John Lithgow and Mel Gibson), each an exaggerated version of his son. Much of the humor is of questionable taste at best, and hardly anybody talks or behaves in ways most of us can empathize with. 95 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Dealt” (star rating unavailable) The story of 62-year-old Richard Turner, who is renowned as one of the world’s greatest card magicians, yet is completely blind. In this documentary, Turner traces his journey from his troubled childhood, when he began losing his vision, to the present day as he relentlessly pursues perfection while struggling with the reality that his biggest weakness might also be his greatest strength. 86 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Human Flow” () Dissident Chinese artist Ai Weiwei doesn’t break any new ground in covering the global refugee crisis, but he vividly illustrates the scale of the problem without compromising the dignity or humanity of the survivors. At the center of Ai’s documentary is a question for our times: Will the world step up to protect the lives of millions caught up in war and economic calamity, or will the forces of nationalism lead to closed borders? 140 minutes. (PG-13)

— David Lewis, The San Francisco Chronicle

“Jane” () This documentary on the life and work of Jane Goodall was made using more than 140 hours of never-before-seen 16 mm footage , Goodall’s own words and a majestic score by Philip Glass. Director Brett Morgen went to Tanzania where he spent two days filming an interview with Goodall, who at 83 recalls her work in crystal-clear detail. The moviegoer gets to watch her go from a newborn researcher who grows through each blade of knowledge observed along the way. 90 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Rick Bentley, Tribune News Service

“The Killing of a Sacred Deer” () A heart surgeon and father of two (Colin Farrell) befriends a creepy neighborhood teen (Barry Keoghan) who seems to have a hold over him. Nearly everyone speaks in a deadpan manner in this twisted, absurd and disturbing story, which never hedges its bets, never takes its foot off the gas. 116 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Loving Vincent” () To tell this story about a mystery surrounding the 1890 death of artist Vincent Van Gogh, the filmmakers assembled a cast, found period-appropriate costumes and sets, and shot the film. Then the real work began: Every frame was hand-painted over in oil paint in the style of Van Gogh, by a team of more than 100 artists. The result is a curious and often exquisite blend of two art forms. The film unfolds as if the viewer fell asleep in a museum and dreamed of art that came alive. 94 minutes. (PG-13)

— Moira Macdonald, The Seattle Times

“Murder on the Orient Express” () Sir Kenneth Branagh slips into fastidious Belgian detective Hercule Poirot’s signature splendid mustache in a star-studded, big-budget remake, which he has also directed. The murder mystery set aboard a train from Istanbul to Calais is the kind of old-fashioned romp we don’t often see anymore, executed with a thoroughly modern sense of verve and rhythm. But as the mystery deepens, reveals itself and grows darker, it becomes sad, delving into the aftermath of trauma and how it reveals itself. 114 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

STILL SHOWING

“A Bad Moms Christmas” () The inspirationally lax trio of mothers (Mila Kunis, Kathryn Hahn and Kristen Bell) is back for another, more seasonally focused round. To add an extra layer of pressure to the holidays this year, their mothers are visiting for the holidays. The sequel never quite captures the disarming hilarity of the original. It was a fast turnaround and it shows, with a good idea and a stellar cast lost inside a sloppy script that mostly retreads last year’s laughs. 104 minutes. (R)

— Stephanie Merry, The Washington Post

“Blade Runner 2049” () The sequel to Ridley Scott’s 1982 sci-fi classic “Blade Runner,” is a remarkable achievement. As LAPD officer K, searching out illegal replicants, Ryan Gosling is perfectly cast as a successor to Deckard (Harrison Ford). This is a dark future that feels all too plausible. “2049” is a wondrous spectacle, imbued with haunting questions about humanity. 164 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Despicable Me 3” () As a couple of hours of kidtertainment, you could do worse, but it’s nothing to write home about. Trey Parker’s ‘80s-inspired super-villain is probably the most entertaining part of the film, aside from perhaps the Fredonian cheese festival. It’s wacky but somehow dull. 90 minutes (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Dina” () Dina and Scott are very much in love and planning to get married. They have an additional complication, which makes the documentary “Dina” so compelling — in varying degrees, both are on the autism spectrum. As the film details Dina’s past, the mood becomes more serious, and it’s by no means obvious that the newlyweds will overcome their substantial problems. But although there may be no fairy-tale endings, by the movie’s end it’s impossible not to wish one for Dina and Scott. 102 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Walter Addiego, The San Francisco Chronicle

“The Foreigner” () This action film offers the same kind of absurd satisfaction as “Taken,” with Jackie Chan as a sweet little guy, an older fellow that no one takes seriously, who becomes a killing machine. It makes use of his martial-arts expertise as well as the fact that he’s now in his early 60s. The movie also allows Chan to demonstrate that he can act. Unlike “Taken,” “The Foreigner’’ has an intricate and well-developed plot. 114 minutes. (R)

— Mick LaSalle, The San Francisco Chronicle

“Geostorm” () The directors of “Geostorm” have taken a passable action film and buried it under a tsunami of political muck. Jake Lawson (Gerard Butler) is the only person who can make the quick jaunt into space to correct a problem with weather controlling satellites he helped create. The action scenes are strong but the film keeps slowing down for the political moments. This film also screens in 3-D and IMAX 3-D. 109 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Goodbye Christopher Robin” () This film of rough edges and jagged twists tries to straddle the line between a whimsical origins story about the beloved Winnie the Pooh, and a harsh character study about the bear’s creator, A.A. Milne (Domhnall Gleeson), and his wife (Margot Robbie), unlikable adults who are far better at exploiting a child than loving him. 117 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Happy Death Day” () The story of a woman who’s caught in an endless loop of her own death, follows in the footsteps of “Get Out” by taking familiar elements from the horror genre but delivering the scares with more wit, wisdom and wonder. Anyone looking to enjoy some scares while trying to figure out a very clever mystery should plan on seeing “Happy Death Day.” 93 minutes. (PG-13)

— Rick Bentley, Tribune News Service

“IT” () This R-rated interpretation of Stephen King’s masterful 1986 novel is a bold, intense, beautifully paced, wickedly hilarious, seriously scary and gorgeously terrifying period-piece work that instantly takes its place among the most impressively twisted horror movies of our time. 135 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Jigsaw” (star rating unavailable) After a series of murders bearing all the markings of the Jigsaw killer, law enforcement find themselves chasing the ghost of a man dead for over a decade and embroiled in a new game that’s only just begun. Is John Kramer back from the dead to remind the world to be grateful for the gift of life? Or is this a trap set by a new killer? 91 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Kingsman: The Golden Circle” () An intrepid drug lord (Julianne Moore) decides to hold the world hostage and only the private security force of the Kingsmen, with an assist from the Kentucky-based Statesmen, can bring her evil plot down. This whole affair is just a truly cynical, painfully retrograde pastiche of meaningless pop nostalgia wrapped around a nonsensical plot, sprinkled with a dusting of repulsive sexism. 141 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Lego Ninjago Movie” () The young hero, Lloyd (Dave Franco), is leading a secret double life as both the son of evil villain Garmadon (Justin Theroux) and the Green Ninja that saves the city from Garmadon’s destruction. It’s a light, serviceable romp around the Legos, but doesn’t come close to the high-key antics of the first two films in the series. 101 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Let There Be Light” (star rating unavailable) After losing his young son to cancer, Dr. Sol Harkens (Kevin Sorbo) has dedicated his life to the cause of atheism. But even with fame and success, Sol is empty and distraught on the inside and his increasing reliance on alcohol to numb the pain is only making things worse until a serious car crash changes Sol’s outlook on life. 100 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from the film’s website

“Lucky” () Harry Dean Stanton, who died Sept. 15 at age 91, was an esteemed character actor who could play cantankerous or melancholy or plain idiosyncratic, all in unforgettable ways. It’s hard to imagine a better sendoff for the gaunt-faced performer than “Lucky,” in which he portrays a Stantonesque codger living in a tiny desert town who must come to terms with his mortality. 88 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Walter Addiego, The San Francisco Chronicle

“The Mountain Between Us” () The story of a man and woman (Idris Elba and Kate Winslet) stranded in the snowy mountains, following a plane crash. To watch it is like being there. The only problem is that for the audience, the calamity shoves aside all other considerations besides survival. Still, this is Elba and Winslet, so we end up liking the characters very much even if we simultaneously are not remotely in love with the movie. 103 minutes. (PG-13)

— Mick LaSalle, The San Francisco Chronicle

“Only the Brave” () This film recounts, in efficient and devastating detail, the 2013 Yarnell Fire in Arizona and the Granite Mountain hotshots crew. It celebrates the jocular, physical friendship of men, as mentors, brothers, enemies, and co-workers and this true-life tale will grasp onto your heart and hold on long after the credits roll. 133 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Suburbicon” () Director George Clooney’s burlesque of racist panic eventually gives way to Hitchcockian horror — before devolving into grotesquerie and gore. As a portrait of the venality, perversion and deceit at the heart of white privilege and obliviousness, “Suburbicon” chooses its targets with insight and reckless brio. While imperfectly expressed, Clooney has made a film just as confounding, disturbing, messed-up and infuriating as the era it reflects — for better and for worse. 105 minutes. (R)

— Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

“Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird Hamilton” (star rating unavailable) A dynamic, dominating personality, Laird Hamilton became one of surfing’s central figures despite refusing to compete professionally and he revolutionized the nature of the sport not once but twice by going in directions few people much cared about. Directed by Oscar-nominated Rory Kennedy, “Take Every Wave” demonstrates without doubt that Hamilton’s personal journey is extraordinary in its scope and achievements. 118 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times

“Thank You for Your Service” () Along with a number of memorable supporting players, Miles Teller is heartbreakingly effective as a U.S. sergeant returning from his third deployment to Iraq with his limbs intact but a fragile mind and psyche. This is a movie about the horrors of war and the extremely difficult and sometimes insurmountable challenges faced by the young soldiers after the fighting has ended and they’re back home. 109 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Thor: Ragnarok” () This is the funniest film in the Thor franchise with a stunning new villain in Hela (Cate Blanchett) and enough big action scenes to fill a half dozen movies. An ancient prophecy looks to be coming true when Thor (Chris Hemsworth) and Loki’s (Tom Hiddleston) sister, Hela, arrives and drives the brothers out of Asgard. Seeing “Thor: Ragnarok” is like riding the world’s fastest and tallest roller coaster that keeps looping through a funhouse. That’s a ride not to be missed. This film also screens in 3-D, IMAX and IMAX 3-D. 135 minutes. (PG-13)

— Rick Bentley, Tribune News Service

“Victoria and Abdul” () “Victoria and Abdul” looks at the deep friendship between a young Indian clerk, Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal), and the aging queen. Without the casting of Judi Dench as Queen Victoria, this period film would have been a passable story of how a woman, strangled by the confines of the monarchy, manages to reach out beyond the palace walls. Dench is such acting royalty that she elevates the tale to a more regal level. 112 minutes. (PG-13)

— Rick Bentley, Tribune News Service

“Walking Out” (star rating unavailable) We are firmly in Jack London territory here, spiritually if not geographically. In this spare but deeply affecting male weepie, the father-son angst, the unflagging peril, the staggering landscapes and the sight of a grizzly bear occasionally crawling into view may remind you of an Oscar-winning epic of recent vintage, but “Walking Out” runs an hour shorter than “The Revenant” and puts it to shame at every minute. 96 minutes. (PG-13)

— Justin Chang, Los Angeles Times

18681573