Occupy protesters find new cause in Sandy aid

The Associated Press /


Published Nov 11, 2012 at 04:00AM / Updated Nov 19, 2013 at 12:31AM

NEW YORK — The social media savvy that helped Occupy Wall Street protesters create a grass-roots global movement last year is proving to be a strength in the wake of Superstorm Sandy as members and organizers of the group fan out across New York to deliver aid including hot meals, medicine and blankets.

They’re the ones who took food and water to Glenn Nisall, a 53-year-old resident of Queens’ hard-hit and isolated Rockaway section who lost power and lives alone, with no family nearby. “I said: ‘Occupy? You mean Occupy Wall Street?’” he said. “I said: ‘Awesome, man. I’m one of the 99 percent, you know?’”

Occupy Wall Street was born in late 2011 in a lower Manhattan plaza called Zuccotti Park, with a handful of protesters vowing to stay put until world leaders offered a fair share to the “99 percent” who don’t control the globe’s wealth. The movement collapsed under its leaderless format. But core members have persisted and found a new cause in Occupy Sandy.

It started at St. Jacobi Church in Brooklyn the day after the storm, where Occupiers set up a base of operations and used social media like Twitter and Facebook to spread the word.

Donations come in by the truckload and are sorted in the basement, which looks like a clearinghouse for every household product imaginable, from canned soup and dog food to duvet covers. “This is young people making history,” said Mark Naison, a professor at Fordham University who has been studying Occupy Wall Street. “Young people who are refusing to let people suffer.”