Washington Week

Money measures in the nation's Capitol

Published Mar 24, 2013 at 05:00AM

WASHINGTON — On Thursday, the Republican-controlled House of Representatives passed the 2014 budget authored by House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wisc. Ryan’s plan, which would balance the federal budget in 10 years using $4.6 trillion in spending cuts, passed by a 221-207 margin. Ten Republicans voted against the budget, the same number that voted against his 2013 budget. All of the yes votes came from GOP members, while 197 Democrats voted against the measure.

U.S. House vote

• Rep. Paul Ryan’s budget plan

Walden (R) Y

Blumenauer (D) N

Bonamici (D) N

DeFazio (D) N

Schrader (D) N

Later on Thursday, the Democrat-controlled Senate rejected Ryan’s budget in a 40-59 vote. Five Republican senators voted against the former GOP vice presidential nominee’s budget: Senators Susan Collins, R-Maine, Ted Cruz, R-Texas, Dean Heller, R-Nev., Mike Lee, R-Utah, and Rand Paul, R-Ky., all voted no, joining the Democratic majority. All of the 40 yes votes came from Republicans.

U.S. Senate vote

• Rep. Paul Ryan’s budget plan

Merkley (D) N

Wyden (D) N

Also on Thursday, both chambers approved a $984 billion continuing resolution that will keep the federal government funded through the end of September. The previous continuing resolution was set to expire before the end of the month, raising the possibility of a government shutdown. The operational funding legislation does not change any of the mandatory spending cuts put into place through sequestration. The measure passed in the House by a 318-109 margin, with 115 Democrats joining 203 Republicans in voting yes. Only 27 Republicans and 82 Democrats opposed the measure.

U.S. House vote

• Continuing resolution on budget

Walden (R) Y

Blumenauer (D) Y

Bonamici (D) Y

DeFazio (D) Y

Schrader (D) N

The continuing resolution passed in the Senate on a 73-26 vote. Sen. John Tester, D-Mont., was the only Democrat to vote against the bill along with 25 Republicans. Twenty Republicans joined the Democratic majority in approving the measure.

U.S. Senate vote

• Continuing resolution on budget

Merkley (D) Y

Wyden (D) Y

U.S. Senate vote

• Early Saturday morning, the Senate adopted its first budget in four years in a 50-49 vote. Read more on Page A3.

Merkley (D) Y

Wyden (D) Y

— Andrew Clevenger, The Bulletin