Around the State

Oregon wolf shot in Idaho — An Oregon wolf known to biologists as OR-16 has been killed by a hunter in Idaho. It’s the second gray wolf equipped with a tracking collar to be shot after leaving Oregon, where they cannot be hunted, or shot for attacking livestock. Oregon wildlife officials say OR-16 was a member of the Walla Walla pack in Northeast Oregon and crossed the Snake River into Idaho last month. He was shot near Lowman, Idaho, on Saturday. The East Oregonian reported that as of Wednesday, 958 wolves have been killed in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming as part of hunts aimed at reducing wolf numbers.

Felon arrested in attempt to sell guns — A 28-year-old felon was arrested in Portland for trying to sell firearms on Facebook. Police say an undercover officer arranged to buy the guns. Four guns were seized in a raid Wednesday, and Kyle Quinn Cully was arrested as a felon in possession of a gun. He has previous convictions for kidnapping and coercion. KGW reports Cully said he was trying to sell the guns for a roommate.

2 skiers hit same tree — Two Mount Hood skiers crashed into the same tree Friday afternoon and were taken by ambulance to a hospital. The Oregonian reports the injuries were not considered life-threatening. Timberline Lodge spokesman Jon Tullis says the skiers were trying to avoid each other but ended up crashing into the same tree. The two had been skiing toward each other on a trail near the lodge. Both were wearing helmets. Their names were not released.

Man accused of trying to steal puppy — A 36-year-old man has been accused of breaking a cage lock and trying to make off with a puppy from the Oregon Humane Society shelter in Portland. Portland police say an employee confronted Brent Klausner, who had the terrier mix puppy under his coat on Jan. 14. Police say Klausner gave up the dog and left. Police said they did an investigation and arrested him on Thursday. The puppy, named Burkhead, has been adopted.

3 in animal neglect case have charges reduced — Prosecutors have reduced the number of counts against three women accused of animal neglect in the housing of 140 dogs found malnourished, filthy or sick at a warehouse in Brooks. The three had faced 149 counts of animal neglect. That’s been reduced for each to 10 counts of first-degree animal neglect, 10 counts of second-degree animal neglect and one count of attempted tampering with physical evidence. Deputy District Attorney Jean Kunkle says it isn’t always necessary to file hundreds of charges to get an appropriate sentence.

— From wire reports