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Pot sales tax revenue grows again

State reports $40.2 million through Sept. 30


Statewide marijuana sales tax receipts grew at a faster pace in August and September than the previous two months, and the state has collected $40.2 million this year, the Oregon Department of Revenue reported Monday.

With a 25 percent sales tax rate on recreational pot in effect through Sept. 30, the tax collections represent an estimated $160.8 million in sales. Oregon does not charge sales tax on medical marijuana.

The latest tax collections are up $14.7 million, or 58 percent, since July 31.

The pace of sales increased in that time frame, as edibles and extracts became legal in June,

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Statewide marijuana sales tax receipts grew at a faster pace in August and September than the previous two months, and the state has collected $40.2 million this year, the Oregon Department of Revenue reported Monday.

With a 25 percent sales tax rate on recreational pot in effect through Sept. 30, the tax collections represent an estimated $160.8 million in sales. Oregon does not charge sales tax on medical marijuana.

The latest tax collections are up $14.7 million, or 58 percent, since July 31.

The pace of sales increased in that time frame, as edibles and extracts became legal in June, the state’s figures show. Collections in the two-month period represent a monthly average of $7.35 million, which is 39 percent higher than the previous monthly average, $5.3 million.

The growth in sales and tax collections seems to have come from concentrates and extracts, which are used in e-cigarette or vaping pens and for cooking, Joy Krawczyk, a Department of Revenue spokeswoman, said Monday.

Consumers will notice a lower tax rate on their receipts if they buy marijuana from a retail outlet. Licensed retailers, which started selling Oct. 1, charge 17 percent. Dispensaries, which had a head start on recreational pot, must continue to charge 25 percent until the end of the year.

While the state’s sales-tax rate will drop to 17 percent Jan. 1, local governments may impose their own sales tax. Bend voters will see a Nov. 8 ballot measure proposing a 3 percent sales tax.

— Reporter: 541-617-7860, kmclaughlin@bendbulletin.com